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Old 12-28-2019, 06:33 PM   #61
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I agree 100%

I have declined delivering boats when the boat is not seaworthy.
When I used to do deliveries I charged an extra day or two just to go over the boat before any other preparations. Only a fool goes to sea in a vessel they're unfamiliar with.
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Old 12-28-2019, 07:15 PM   #62
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When I used to do deliveries I charged an extra day or two just to go over the boat before any other preparations. Only a fool goes to sea in a vessel they're unfamiliar with.
Me too.

My contract with clients stipulated that I inspected the boat for seaworthyness prior to the delivery and if not, the contract was void. Lost many potential clients when they balked on that part of the contract.

If the delivery was shortly after purchase, I read the survey to determine if the boat is seaworthy. But still did my own inspection before accepting the job.

If there was no survey, then I did my own assessement of the boats seaworthyness prior to accepting the assignment.

For short inland deliveries such as taking a twin engine boat through the Ballard Locks to a repair yard, I still inspected the boat but was more lax with issues.

I did not do too many offshore deliveries since most owners were looking for the least expensive delivery captain, least number of days for delivery or I found that the boat was not safe. And there are too many skippers willing to do deliveries for less money than what I was charging.

Don't have to make those decisions any more. I retired and let my CG License expire. Yeah!
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Old 12-28-2019, 08:18 PM   #63
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That's just the point, a good captain doesn't sail on an unseaworthy vessel. Being seaworthy starts at the dock.
Touchet! Kind of...

So much as: If an at dock seaworthy boat becomes unseaworthy after going to sea, due to unexpected onboard mishap... even the best captain may not be able to handle that "then" suddenly unseaworthy boat.

Just saying!
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Old 12-28-2019, 08:35 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by syjos View Post
Me too.

My contract with clients stipulated that I inspected the boat for seaworthyness prior to the delivery and if not, the contract was void. Lost many potential clients when they balked on that part of the contract.

If the delivery was shortly after purchase, I read the survey to determine if the boat is seaworthy. But still did my own inspection before accepting the job.

If there was no survey, then I did my own assessement of the boats seaworthyness prior to accepting the assignment.

For short inland deliveries such as taking a twin engine boat through the Ballard Locks to a repair yard, I still inspected the boat but was more lax with issues.

I did not do too many offshore deliveries since most owners were looking for the least expensive delivery captain, least number of days for delivery or I found that the boat was not safe. And there are too many skippers willing to do deliveries for less money than what I was charging.

Don't have to make those decisions any more. I retired and let my CG License expire. Yeah!
Honestly I only took and take surveys as general information. First of which of course is it's a rare bird indeed that's a surveyor that can assess machinery well, second is your cousin Vinny can be a surveyor.
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Old 12-28-2019, 09:59 PM   #65
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Touchet! Kind of...

So much as: If an at dock seaworthy boat becomes unseaworthy after going to sea, due to unexpected onboard mishap... even the best captain may not be able to handle that "then" suddenly unseaworthy boat.

Just saying!
Then the "best captain" is in fact not actually the best captain are they? At sea there is no second place. After thousands of miles and thousands of hours of work at sea, much of it under difficult conditions the accomplishment I am most proud of is I never lost a man and I never lost a vessel or failed to return to port safely. That may sound like brag but I only cite it as an illustration of being prepared and trained for every imaginable circumstance both by practice and experience. We don't all have the availability of the breadth of experience but we can make use of learning and practice. I carried paid crews expected to experience some danger, discomfort and difficult conditions while most pleasure boater carry loved ones. Are they any less deserving of competent operation? Before you inspect a vessel for it's seaworthiness it may be wise to review your own for in the end that's ultimately where seaworthiness lies.
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Old 12-29-2019, 01:47 AM   #66
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Then the "best captain" is in fact not actually the best captain are they? At sea there is no second place. After thousands of miles and thousands of hours of work at sea, much of it under difficult conditions the accomplishment I am most proud of is I never lost a man and I never lost a vessel or failed to return to port safely. That may sound like brag but I only cite it as an illustration of being prepared and trained for every imaginable circumstance both by practice and experience. We don't all have the availability of the breadth of experience but we can make use of learning and practice. I carried paid crews expected to experience some danger, discomfort and difficult conditions while most pleasure boater carry loved ones. Are they any less deserving of competent operation? Before you inspect a vessel for it's seaworthiness it may be wise to review your own for in the end that's ultimately where seaworthiness lies.

Correct... Correct!
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Old 12-29-2019, 02:07 AM   #67
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Seaworthy

Seaworthy: Condition is Fit for duty at sea..
Airworthy: Condition is Fit for duty in the air..

Sometimes these terms are interchanged with conversation of design capabilities, i.e.,
at sea: multiple water tight compartments with pump out options to maintain floatation; multiple engine and drive systems for redundancy.

In air: Turbine reliability and/or twin engine redundancy...

Summary:
Seaworthy/Airworthy = Condition of design.
Vs.
Capability = Design
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Old 02-13-2020, 01:53 PM   #68
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Without ever even having been aboard a Bluewater 40 I can tell you that you could safely take your boat along any coastline as long as fuel stops are witnin your safe fuel range.

Enjoy your boat and when its really snotty stay in port and enjoy life.

Id rather be sitting happy in port enjoying life than braving huge seas in any recreational boat.

Learn your and your boats comfortable limitations through practice and enjoy your boat.
Could not agree more
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Old 02-13-2020, 02:19 PM   #69
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Then the "best captain" is in fact not actually the best captain are they? At sea there is no second place. After thousands of miles and thousands of hours of work at sea, much of it under difficult conditions the accomplishment I am most proud of is I never lost a man and I never lost a vessel or failed to return to port safely. That may sound like brag but I only cite it as an illustration of being prepared and trained for every imaginable circumstance both by practice and experience. We don't all have the availability of the breadth of experience but we can make use of learning and practice. I carried paid crews expected to experience some danger, discomfort and difficult conditions while most pleasure boater carry loved ones. Are they any less deserving of competent operation? Before you inspect a vessel for it's seaworthiness it may be wise to review your own for in the end that's ultimately where seaworthiness lies.


Breath of fresh air. Thanks.
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