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Old 05-16-2017, 08:06 PM   #1
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Thinking of buying a 1965 Grand Banks

I would like some opinions on 1965 Grand Banks. It is 36 Ft 12 Ft beam twin ford diesels. What to look for etc.. 2600 hours on engines. Any information is helpful and requested. Does any one know a price range for such a Trawler?
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:10 PM   #2
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If its timber with rot it should be free if it hasn't got rot its not timber
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:19 PM   #3
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Greetings,
Welcome aboard. 2600 hrs on well maintained Lehmans is no problem. There are several GB owners who know a whole heck of a lot more than I do and I'm sure they will be able to best advise you. The bottom line is get a good survey by someone who is very familiar with wooden boats. If you can find a surveyor who is also familiar with GB's, that will be a bonus.
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:19 PM   #4
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If its timber with rot it should be free if it hasn't got rot its not timber
Are you saying it probably has dry rot?????
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:21 PM   #5
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Are you saying it probably has dry rot?????


50 year old wood boat... I would expect there would be some rot somewhere.
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:22 PM   #6
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50 year old wood boat... I would expect there would be some rot somewhere.
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:23 PM   #7
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I would like some opinions on 1965 Grand Banks. It is 36 Ft 12 Ft beam twin ford diesels. What to look for etc.. 2600 hours on engines. Any information is helpful and requested. Does any one know a price range for such a Trawler?
Head over to the GB owners site and ask there.
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:33 PM   #8
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Are you saying it probably has dry rot?????

Dry rot, wet rot, worms, delamination, smell ,twisted timbers ,hogged
Get it surveyed and do your research for a surveyor that specializes in timber boats then get a second surveyor opinion .
A 1965 timber boat will need constant attention unless its have a total rebuild in the last few years

I know and never again .


PS the only way to get smell out of a timber boat is with a match
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Old 05-16-2017, 08:55 PM   #9
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Gaston sounds like you do not like timber boats
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:05 PM   #10
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Gaston sounds like you do not like timber boats

On the contrary I love timber boats my dream boat is a timber one . I love everything about timber boats they bring you closer to god and your surroundings they feel different in the water .

A 1965 timber boat will cost you 2 to 3 time the money to bring it back to life than a fiberglass boat of the same.
And when you have spent 10s of 1000s $$$$ and decide to sell it you will find no one wants it will be just like you found it worthless

And dont start me on steel boats hehhehhe
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:41 PM   #11
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Yep I know they are a different bread. I have never owned one lots of glass ones up to a 40 foot aft cabin Sea Ray but never wood. Maybe I should just pass on this one. I even hate to pay up to a 1000.00 bucks for a survey knowing that they will probably find issues with it. More than 1000.00 if you include pull out.
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:44 PM   #12
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Yep I know they are a different bread. I have never owned one lots of glass ones up to a 40 foot aft cabin Sea Ray but never wood. Maybe I should just pass on this one. I even hate to pay up to a 1000.00 bucks for a survey knowing that they will probably find issues with it. More than 1000.00 if you include pull out.



O don't let me put you off
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Old 05-16-2017, 09:47 PM   #13
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There are people here with treasured classic Halvorsen timber boats they maintain like vintage cars, I don`t blame you for being interested. I love seeing the old Halvorsens, but have enough trouble maintaining timber windows on a f/g Island Gypsy.
Good luck with it, whichever way you go.
Are the engines Lehman marinized, or do they predate Lehman?
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:11 PM   #14
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I agree with Gaston, wooden boats are a thing of beauty. I think they are nearly alive compared to fiberglass. A joy to be aboard. But.... you better have deep pockets. Or be willing to break your back working on her. Or both.

My story:
In 1978 I bought a 1929 wooden cruiser (that's what they were called before we started calling them trawlers). She was 49 yrs old, aren't you looking at a boat that's 50 yrs old? The price was $9000. A classy old girl that clearly needed some TLC. I hired a surveyor who claimed to be an expert in wooden boats. As I got to know her on a personal level we developed quite a relationship. I gave, she took.
- Half of the frames were sistered.
- 30% of the hull replanked.
- The entire hull recaulked and refastened.
- The entire transom replaced.
- The foredeck replaced.
- The aft cabin torn apart to get at the failing fuel tanks.
- The ceiling (the old wood boat term for the stuff on the sides of the boat insidethe frames) in the forward cabin replaced.
- The toe rail replaced.
- The forward windows rebuilt.
- The cabin tops canvas renewed.

Everytime I touched anything I found rot, broken frames, failed fasteners, on and on and on. I don't know how much I put into her. At first I hired shipwrights to do the work. It wasn't long before I realized I couldn't afford their services so I became a respectable shipwright myself. Some of the old guys took an interest in teaching me their craft. I ended up working in the trade for about 5 yrs. In the end I sold her in 1983 for $7000. Finding a buyer was nearly impossible. I had to sell her on a private contract because I could not find a buyer with either cash or the ability to get a loan. They never finsished paying for her. I gave up trying to collect and signed the title over just to be done. I got less than half of what they agreed to pay.

Adjsting for inflation that's a purchase price of $35,685 and a sales price of $17,428 (if I'd collected all of it).

I know some of the last craftsmen in this area capable of working on wooden boats. It's not uncommon for a beautiful old woodie to come in for "a little work" and leave months later with a bill approaching $100K. In the end they're worth the same $$ as the day they came in the yard.

If you love wooden boats and can handle the strain you will be rewarded in ways fiberglass never will. But, if you're looking to get a deal. Look elsewhere.

Me? I haven't learned a thing. I missed the one in the pics by one day. Someone got an offer in before me. She is 78 ft of 1930s heavy timber. I love work boats, she was to my eye gorgeous. I was in love as soon as I stepped aboard but she would have killed me financially. Oh but I would have loved the ride.
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:16 PM   #15
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I agree with Gaston, wooden boats are a thing of beauty. I think they are nearly alive compared to fiberglass. A joy to be aboard. But.... you better have deep pockets. Or be willing to break your back working on her. Or both.

My story:
In 1978 I bought a 1929 wooden cruiser (that's what they were called before we started calling them trawlers). She was 49 yrs old, aren't you looking at a boat that's 50 yrs old? The price was $9000. A classy old girl that clearly needed some TLC. I hired a surveyor who claimed to be an expert in wooden boats. As I got to know her on a personal level we developed quite a relationship. I gave, she took. Half of the frames were sistered. 30% of the hull replanked. The entire hull recaulked and refastened. The entire transom replaced. The foredeck replaced. The aft cabin torn apart to get at the failing fuel tanks. The ceiling (the old wood boat term for the stuff on the sides of the boat insidethe frames) in the forward cabin replaced. The toe rail replaced. The forward windows rebuilt. The cabin tops canvas renewed. Everytime I touched anything I found rot, broken frames, failed fasteners, on and on and on. I don't know how much I put into her. At first I hired shipwrights to do the work. It wasn't long before I realized I couldn't afford their services so I became a respectable shipwright myself. Some of the old guys took an interest in teaching me their craft. I ended up working in the trade for about 5 yrs. In the end I sold her in 1983 for $7000. Finding a buyer was nearly impossible. I had to sell her on a private contract because I could not find a buyer with either cash or the ability to get a loan. They never finsished paying for her. I gave up trying to collect and signed the title over just to be done. I got less than half of what they agreed to pay.

Adjsting for inflation that's a purchase price of $35,685 and a sales price of $17,428 (if I'd collected all of it). I hang out with some of the last craftsmen in this area capable of working on wooden boats. It's not uncommon for a beautiful old woodie to come in for "a little work" and leave months later with a bill approaching $100K. In the end they're worth the same $$ as the day they came in the yard.

If you love wooden boats and can handle the strain you will be rewarded in ways fiberglass never will. But, if you're looking to get a deal. Look elsewhere.

Me? I haven't learned a thing. I missed the one in the pics by one day. Someone got an offer in before me. She is 78 ft of 1930s heavy timber. I love work boats, she was to my eye gorgous. I was in love as soon as I stepped abarod but she would have killed me financially. Oh but I would have loved the ride.

So it was you that purchased my boat "sorry" you seem a nice guy was wishing a mass murderer had purchased it
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:25 PM   #16
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Gaston,

If you're thinking I purchased Pelican. No, I missed her by one day. Not even a day. The offer was presented the evening before I could. I wanted that boat so much that in hind sight I should have started a bidding war.

But she'd gone pending and back on the market many times before I screwd up the courage to go see her. I could guess what happened. Potential buyers had no idea what they were getting into. Heavy timbers, 78 feet, 90 tons. And to top it off direct reversing. I thought the latest suitor would also fail so I decided to wait him out. She's gone now. I hope to a good home.
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Old 05-16-2017, 10:40 PM   #17
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Gaston,

If you're thinking I purchased Pelican. No, I missed her by one day. Not even a day. The offer was presented the evening before I could. I wanted that boat so much that in hind sight I should have started a bidding war.

But she'd gone pending and back on the market many times before I screwd up the courage to go see her. I could guess what happened. Potential buyers had no idea what they were getting into. Heavy timbers, 78 feet, 90 tons. And to top it off direct reversing. I thought the latest suitor would also fail so I decided to wait him out. She's gone now. I hope to a good home.



No I'm in Australia but your story was the mirror story of my wooden boat I gave her away in the end to save my sanity and our marriage.
I did have my eye on a 60 timber Ferry 100 years old thank god I didn't it sold for $20000 and cost the new owner his house 12 months later in fines , salvage and disposal . He purposely scuttled it and got caught
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Old 05-16-2017, 11:11 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Portage_Bay View Post
I agree with Gaston, wooden boats are a thing of beauty. I think they are nearly alive compared to fiberglass. A joy to be aboard. But.... you better have deep pockets. Or be willing to break your back working on her. Or both.

My story:
In 1978 I bought a 1929 wooden cruiser (that's what they were called before we started calling them trawlers). She was 49 yrs old, aren't you looking at a boat that's 50 yrs old? The price was $9000. A classy old girl that clearly needed some TLC. I hired a surveyor who claimed to be an expert in wooden boats. As I got to know her on a personal level we developed quite a relationship. I gave, she took.
- Half of the frames were sistered.
- 30% of the hull replanked.
- The entire hull recaulked and refastened.
- The entire transom replaced.
- The foredeck replaced.
- The aft cabin torn apart to get at the failing fuel tanks.
- The ceiling (the old wood boat term for the stuff on the sides of the boat insidethe frames) in the forward cabin replaced.
- The toe rail replaced.
- The forward windows rebuilt.
- The cabin tops canvas renewed.

Everytime I touched anything I found rot, broken frames, failed fasteners, on and on and on. I don't know how much I put into her. At first I hired shipwrights to do the work. It wasn't long before I realized I couldn't afford their services so I became a respectable shipwright myself. Some of the old guys took an interest in teaching me their craft. I ended up working in the trade for about 5 yrs. In the end I sold her in 1983 for $7000. Finding a buyer was nearly impossible. I had to sell her on a private contract because I could not find a buyer with either cash or the ability to get a loan. They never finsished paying for her. I gave up trying to collect and signed the title over just to be done. I got less than half of what they agreed to pay.

Adjsting for inflation that's a purchase price of $35,685 and a sales price of $17,428 (if I'd collected all of it).

I know some of the last craftsmen in this area capable of working on wooden boats. It's not uncommon for a beautiful old woodie to come in for "a little work" and leave months later with a bill approaching $100K. In the end they're worth the same $$ as the day they came in the yard.

If you love wooden boats and can handle the strain you will be rewarded in ways fiberglass never will. But, if you're looking to get a deal. Look elsewhere.

Me? I haven't learned a thing. I missed the one in the pics by one day. Someone got an offer in before me. She is 78 ft of 1930s heavy timber. I love work boats, she was to my eye gorgeous. I was in love as soon as I stepped aboard but she would have killed me financially. Oh but I would have loved the ride.


I wanted Pelican in the worst way! If we could have found reasonable moorage I would have bought her. Got to spend many hours crawling around her in Bellingham.
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Old 05-16-2017, 11:22 PM   #19
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It sounds to me that you are a less than experienced woodworker and boater. I would pass on this boat. 2600 hours on these engines are just broken in. The issue is some of the questions you posed to the group kind of reveal that your a newbie.
Walk away from this project.
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Old 05-16-2017, 11:57 PM   #20
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Bob,

I understand the attraction. I was first aboard Pelican shortly after she was moved from Bellingham to Port Angeles. I found the owner aboard and asked if I could look around. He gave me free reign to look anywhere I pleased. I wanted Pelican then and there but she wasn't for sale yet. I've heard from good sources the initial asking price when she went up for sale a few years later was $300K. By the time I spotted her on Yachtworld last fall she was down to $49K. I stayed away because I knew I'd write a check for her on the spot! I was pretty sure I had moorage arranged when we went to look at her. Insurance would be another matter for lots of potential buyers. But I have documented experience with that size, tonnage and direct reversing.
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