Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-30-2017, 02:51 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
LeoKa's Avatar
 
City: Bainbridge Island WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ironside
Vessel Model: 54' Bruce Roberts design, custom built, steel, sailboat hull, single CAT 3306 Turbo.
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 458
CA to WA delivery options

If there is a trawler, under 100K, between 45-55', is it worth it to bring her up to WA on water by hiring a captain, or truck it over to PNW?
Or, I should not bother and find something around Puget Sound?
Thanks.
__________________
Advertisement

LeoKa is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 03:04 PM   #2
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 11,757
The PNW is trawler country. You should be able to find a suitable one there.
__________________

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 03:51 PM   #3
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 7,591
In 2002, I did just the opposite and bought a trawler in Everett and moved it to LA. It is easier going downhill than uphill. Going from CA to WA the waves will be against you. It was an exciting trip at times with up to 18' seas and other times beautifully flat. Several complete days of fog. I would do it again, but only if I didn't have the time deadlines I did before.
Comodave is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 04:12 PM   #4
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,429
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoKa View Post
If there is a trawler, under 100K, between 45-55', is it worth it to bring her up to WA on water by hiring a captain, or truck it over to PNW?
Or, I should not bother and find something around Puget Sound?
Thanks.
I bought a sailboat in SoCal in 2010 and had it trucked North. I couldn't find the boat I wanted in the PNW and I was looking for something very specific. Back then, the cost was about $10k if I recall. If you have a fly bridge to take off and then put back on, add that cost to the cost of moving the boat. So maybe the cost to truck it could be 10% or better of the purchase price.

It would be much easier to buy a boat that is already in the Salish Sea. As Mark said, there are a LOT of great boats for sail in this area.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 04:28 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: La Paz, BCS
Country: Mexico
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 311
Comodave,

Did you stop at night, or power straight through? I will be moving my new boat this weekend from SF to Channel Islands. I'd like to anchor or dack at night. Do you have any suggestions?

Thanks, Bill
__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 07:26 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
alfamike's Avatar
 
City: Camarillo
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 348
Smile San fran - to - Channel islands

Montenido,

TRIP: San Francisco Bay CA to Channel Islands Harbor near Oxnard, CA.

I have done that trip both ways many times.

if you want, you can contact me off line & we can talk.

I live in general Oxnard / Camarillo general area of So-Cal.

Last trip took me 2 days, 2 hours, 22 minutes - and we went straight through with no stops.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Channel Islands Hbr to Santa Barbara - 27
Santa Barbara to Cojo Anchorage - 35
Cojo Anchorage. to Port San Luis - 51
Port San Luis to Morro Bay - 21
Morro Bay to Monterey - 102
Monterey to Half Moon Bay - 62
Half Moon Bay to San Francisco Bay - 24


total - harbor entrance sea buoy to sea buoy - 322
*In harbor mileage extra
All distances in Nautical Miles
--------------------------------------------------------------------


Happy to discuss where we stopped on previous trips.

Good luck.

Alfa Mike
alfamike is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 07:32 PM   #7
Guru
 
City: Port Townsend
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,563
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
The PNW is trawler country. You should be able to find a suitable one there.


I did find the boat I wanted in SF in 2012 and drove it to Seattle on her own bottom. Just make sure it's a well found boat and watch the weather. Don't have a schedule.

But yes it's much easier to buy one here.
dhmeissner is offline  
Old 05-30-2017, 11:19 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
alfamike's Avatar
 
City: Camarillo
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 348
KK - 42 for one & a half - Not mine & not related to it

LEOKA -- I Saw this ad - not mine & not relatred to this in any way

FYI - With it's raised pilothouse, interior room is good as any 45 to 46 footer.. It is in the PNW.
So easy to go look at it.
these are good well-founded boats.

Good luck.

1983 Kadey Krogen Pilothouse
US$ 149,000
La Conner, WA

<a href="http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1983/Kadey-Krogen-Pilothouse-3079812/La-Conner/WA/United-States#" target="_blank">Share14




































New arrival

Year:1983Length:42'Engine/Fuel Type:Single / diesel
Located In:La Conner, WAHull Material:FiberglassYW#:75538-3079812
Current Price:US$ 149,000


Toad Hall has been repowered with a John Deere diesel. Her longtime owners are reluctantly selling her. This boat has cruised between Seattle and Alaska multiple times and is ready to take her new owners on many more adventures. Bow thruster!

Contact: Eric Blendheim 206.948.9037
fairhavenyachtsales@gmail.com

Please contact Eric Blendheim at 206.948.9037

Additional Specs, Equipment and Information:


Boat Name
Toad Hall

Specs
Builder: krogen
Flag of Registry: United States
Hull Shape: Displacement

Dimensions
LOA: 42 ft 0 in
Beam: 15 ft 0 in
Maximum Draft: 4 ft 0 in

Engines
Engine 1:
Engine Brand: John Deere
Engine Type: Inboard
Engine/Fuel Type: Diesel
Propeller: 3 blade propeller
Drive Type: Direct Drive

Cruising Speed: 7 knots @ 1800 RPM

Tanks
Fresh Water Tanks: 2 Plastic (150 Gallons)
Fuel Tanks: 2 Fiberglass (350 Gallons)
Holding Tanks: 1 Plastic (45 Gallons)

Accommodations
Number of twin berths: 2
Number of double berths: 1
Number of cabins: 2
Number of heads: 1

Electronics
Log-speedometer
Depthsounder
DVD player
Radar
Compass
Autopilot
VHF
GPS

Inside Equipment
Electric bilge pump
Hot water
Electric head
Refrigerator
Oven
Heating
Battery charger
Manual bilge pump
Washing machine
Sea water pump
Microwave oven
Bow thruster

Electrical Equipment
Generator
Inverter
Shore power inlet
Electrical Circuit: 12V

Outside Equipment/Extras
Tender
Radar reflector
Teak cockpit
Davits
Electric windlass

Specs
Builder/Designer

Builder: Kadey Krogen Yachts Designer: Jim Krogen
Dimensions

LOA: 42.33 feet LWL: 39.17 feet Beam: 15 feet
Displacement: 40000 pound Bridge Clearance: 24 feet Ballast: 2500 pound
Engines

Engine John Deere
Cruising Speed: 7 knots Max Speed: 9.5 knots
Tankage

Tankage: Fuel 2 of fiberglass with 350 gallons each capacity.
Water 2 plastic under sole amidship with 350 gallon capacity
Holding tank installed new about 2006, y valve for discharge to sea or
tank and deck pump out.
Propane for stove in vented lazarette on flying bridge, 2
aluminum tanks.
Small camping style propane cylinders for BBQ stored in same vented
lazarette as above

Mechanical
The engine room is clean and orderly. A very experienced skipper has kept the vessel in suburb condition. Organized spares storage, clean bilges, Generator in sound shield, everything is carefully maintained.
dual racors filters
large secondary alterator
high water alarm and emergency bilge pump
John Deere model 6068, 6 cylinders, serial # CD6068TF31415, Yr 2003, Installed 2004 new, cruising rpm 1,700, fuel consumption 1.9 GPH

The John Deere is the ultimate cruising engine. These long- lived work horses are supported with technicians and parts availability around the world.
Hydraulic Bow Thruster!

Accommodations, Furnishings & Layout
Accommodations: Forward owners stateroom with queen island bed
Guest/study cabin with desk and one lower and one fold up single bunk
Head with dedicated shower
U shaped galley on main level
Salon with built in leather settee on stb. and storage and 2 person seating
on port
Pilot house with full length bunk across back which can be converted to a
double

Canvas
Canvas: Dingy cover, Flying bridge cover which will roll up aft to allow viewing
under it, Bimini, Aft enclosure with big windows, winter storage sacrificial
aft enclosure white with small windows, windlass and bow sprit cover,
fender covers plaid for tube shapes and black for round shapes, sloping
cover over the large locker on the foredeck.

Galley & Laundry
Galley: Force 10 propane 3 burner stove with oven
Summit 110 volt freezer new 2013
Summit 110 volt refrigerator new 2013
GE Spacesaver microwave new about 2013

Deck and Flybridge Equipment
Anchors: 66 lb. Bruce with 180’ of 3/8” galvanized chain
55 lb. Delta with 50’ of chain and 200’ of 3 strand nylon line
Windlass: Electric windlass with remote deck switch (handle under foredeck locker cover and remote in pilot house drawer)
Dingy: Aquapro 10’ RIB probably yr. 2000

Outboard motor: Yamaha 15 HP probably yr. 2000
Paravane poles: Stabilizers mounted on side decks
EPIRB: 406 ACR Global Fix Pro (registered to present owners. Needs to be
changed after sale)
Broker Comments
A warm and comfortable liveaboard and capable long range cruiser lovingly cared for by extremely knowledgable owners.

Electronics
Radar: Furuno model 1932 Mark 2, serial #3379-0732, card added to show contact’s direction and speed and time of meeting on the radar screen.
GPS: Garman 128 serial # 94734115 mounted overhead in the pilot house
Computers: Compac running Windows XP for compatibility with nav. software.
Depth sounders: Garman 240
Interphase Probe
Datamarine model 3000
Radios: Icom VHF with AIS receiver built in. can see targets on radio’s screen or on computer screen
Icom VHF
Ham/Single sideband Icom model IC710 with ant. tuner
Two person to person head set radios for communicating when landing
Autopilot: Comnav1001 with remote
alfamike is offline  
Old 06-01-2017, 02:07 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
LeoKa's Avatar
 
City: Bainbridge Island WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Ironside
Vessel Model: 54' Bruce Roberts design, custom built, steel, sailboat hull, single CAT 3306 Turbo.
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhmeissner View Post


I did find the boat I wanted in SF in 2012 and drove it to Seattle on her own bottom. Just make sure it's a well found boat and watch the weather. Don't have a schedule.

Let's say there is no schedule. Let's say, the sea is not crazy.
How many days would you calculate for the trip from CA to WA? How many stops? What was your estimate for fuel and provisions, including 10% reserve?
Thanks.
LeoKa is offline  
Old 06-01-2017, 08:25 PM   #10
Guru
 
City: Port Townsend
Country: North America
Vessel Name: The Promise
Vessel Model: Roughwater 35
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,563
We stopped in Crescent City and Westport. The trip took a little under 7 days driving around the clock at mostly 7 knots. We had 5 crew, including the delivery captain. We always had a 2 man watch. I'd have to look at the log to remember the fuel consumption, but I recall an average of 2.2 gal/hr all said and done. The only somewhat rough patch was around Cape Medicino and heavy fog off the Oregon coast. We stayed inside 10nm up the coast.
dhmeissner is offline  
Old 06-01-2017, 08:33 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
alfamike's Avatar
 
City: Camarillo
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 348
Smile San Francisco South to Channel Islands Harbor trip

To answer your questions for the trip south from San Francisco to Channel Islands Harbor at Oxnard, CA.


Going north is a much rougher trip. Lots more miles & lots of harbors with a Bar that can not be entered if weather is bad. I will discuss that trip north another day.

So to go south from San Francisco, Plan for 4 to 5 days food, water & fuel to do this passage since your stopping each night.- may not need it - but better to have extra than not enough.

If you go straight through running 24 hours a day non-stop, figure about 2 day & 3 hours or about 51 hours will do it fine.

3 - danger areas - :

1. - Departing SF Bay & adjacent shipping lanes
2. - lea short of section from Monterey to San Simeon or Morro Bay, &
3. - going south of Port San Luis when headed in to area off Point Arguello & around Point Conception.

1. - You will not be able to go as fast as you think you will. You are not on flat water of SF Bay or the protected waters of the Santa Barbara Channel. Your in the real Pacific Ocean, so hope for the best but plan for the worst. We all want to go 8 knots - but the seas usually don't allow that. You need comfort for the long trip & you will have different shifts of people at the helm. Most of the time your running on Auto Pilot. So try to run at 7.0 to 7.5 knots & go from there. Usual average is 6.5 knots - of course weather dependent.

2. - Don't arrive at a strange port after sundown ! -- Always plan ahead with a buffer. So Look at the number of day light hours available to plan your departure time - this time of year maybe 15 hours of reliable daylight - so I looked up the sun tables for you - this coming weekend dawn is at 4:39 am & sun rise is at 5:43 am. Sunset is 8:00 pm & full dark is at 9:00pm.

So leave early at first dawn light & try hard to arrive before sunset. This is a safety thing.

Longest run is the Approximately 110 miles from Monterey to San Simeon Bay. That is a lea shore with NO WHERE to hide - so always confirm the weather before departure & monitor it enroute. Do not make the mistake of you running to close to the shore, Because if you clog a filter or such you need time & the farther your off shore the more time you have. I run 5 miles off minimum.

Figure average speed of 6.5 knots. Estimate Fuel burn of 2 to 3 an hour for small engine up to 4 to 5 gal per hour per engine - all speed dependent. Depends on how you run your engine, gearing, prop, engine size, How many engines, etc. You will be safe with those numbers. Every wave is a mountain you have to climb, so figure accordingly. They can be pretty big in this area.

Depends where your departing from inside San Francisco can make a big difference in 1st days progress as well as the tidal flow in the bay can effect your speed over the bottom a lot, -- as it can be a good part of the whole 1st day just getting to the Golden Gate depending where your departing from, timing, tides, weather, etc....

Next consideration is that some times weather & swells mean you can't take the south channel after mile rock & that means it would then require you to go all the way out to the sea buoy before you can turn south. Always, Stay in the channels as lots of sneaker waves in this area.

Also when you are in the process of leaving the SF Bay the tide timing is crucial as currents can be coming in as strong as 6 knots if the tide is against you & that can make for very slow going.

Also wind & currents that are adverse can make square waves that can beat you up till you get to deep water if the wind is strong & the tide is going out, so plan well for that. I prefer just before slack time by about 1 hour for under the GG When headed west. I prefer to go out to at least 5 miles off coast unless very, very calm & then you can maybe take south channel.

If there is any question - DO NOT TAKE SOUTH CHANNEL unless in very calm conditions - they get sneaker waves there that can roll your boat if taken on the beam.

If time & tides are not in your favor, to give your crew a rest make first day an easy one & head for Pillar Point Harbor at Half Moon Bay as back up to first stopping point for a comfortable over night sleep & rest for all. There are good restaurants there. My favorite is the "Ketch Joanne" . However, as you approach, Don't hug the coast as that is where "Mavericks'" is located with the world famous 30 foot swells.

SF to Half Moon Bay - as 1st possibility of first day progress - or if tides, wind, weather & sea condition allow then head for Monterey or Moss landing - 1st day. Skip Santa Cruz if you can as it is often shoaled in at entrance & can be tricky.

Second day is the jump from Monterey to San Simeon Bay or Morro Bay. or Port San Luis as back up to the back up.
I prefer San Simeon Bay as a planning point when winds are north west as some time they close the entrance to Morro Bay as there is a dangerous bar there & it can be impossible to get in. They are close to each other so if weather & seas allow you can do either one., but you have San Simeon in your hip pocket just in case - unless there is a south wind & swell - in which case stay away.

Third Day is San Simeon Bay or Morro Bay or Port San Luis headed out & then south -- around past Point Arguello & Point Conception -- which is the cape horn of the central California coast -- & then on down & into the Santa Barbara Channel. Stay well off shore in this Point Arguello & Conception area, -- do not hug the coast. Cape effect winds & seas in this area. There are several off shore oil rig's in the area, so use your radar.

After you round the cape & it's 2 points & get into the channel you can go into near by Cojo Anchorage or even go to Santa Barbara harbor - 35 miles. Great food in Santa Barbara. No facilities of any kind at Cojo, but good anchorage.

However, by then you may be smelling the barn & may want to head straight for Channel Islands Harbor. it is about 64 miles or so which at 8 knots is 8 hours. So You can now travel at 8 knots in the Santa Barbara Channel & make better time.

From there it is a easy run to Channel Islands Harbor at 64 miles.

best case 3 days with 2 over nights.

Average case 4 day with 3 over nights.

Worst case 5 days with 4 over nights

Approximately 325 Nautical Miles plus miles for going out & back to your off shore cruising route which adds about 10 additional miles a day.

Of course possible additional days lay over here or there if weather changes on you enroute.

NOTE: When you enter Channel Islands use the south of the break water entrance as the north end shoals in quickly after dredging.

Good luck & smooth seas.

Alfa Mike
alfamike is offline  
Old 06-01-2017, 09:12 PM   #12
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 7,591
We ran through several nights and stopped in harbors other nights. Depended on weather and what harbors worked out. Went into Grays Harbor in 16' seas, the Coast Guard escorted us in. Were going to go into Coos Bay and then decided that it was so nice we went back out and ran through the night to Humbolt. We did get weathered in at Humbolt so we left the boat and came back a month later and ran from Humbolt to Monterrey over night. Stayed in Monterrey for a couple of days waiting on weather around Point Conception. We left Monterrey and timed PC for 3 AM when it was supposed to lay down. We got hammered in the dark around PC. Ran from Monterrey to San Pedro nonstop. It was about 130 hours run time if I recall.
Comodave is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 12:12 AM   #13
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Speedy Charlotte
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 44
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 677
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoKa View Post
If there is a trawler, under 100K, between 45-55', is it worth it to bring her up to WA on water by hiring a captain, or truck it over to PNW?
Or, I should not bother and find something around Puget Sound?
Thanks.
For reference, we trucked a 44' trawler from Seattle, WA to Alameda, CA (so similar route in reverse) back in December and it ran just shy of $7,000. The price was based on the fact that the clearance was below 16' which meant they avoided various fees associated with shipping something higher than 16'.

Trucking company was Associated Boat Transport. Boat arrived on time, and in perfect condition.
MichaelB1969 is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 10:16 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
alfamike's Avatar
 
City: Camarillo
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 348
Smile Puget Sound is trawler heaven

Looking at the ad's it seems to me that the general Seattle & Puget Sound area is trawler heaven. Lots of good trawlers for sale up there. Seems only Florida has more.
Transporting the boat from San Francisco or So-Cal up to there will cost from $ 7 K to $ 10 K -- and that money is not going to increase the amount of boat you get.
Better to add in your transportations cost to your total budget you have to spend & get a Washington Boat in a slightly higher price range so you get more boat.
I would move your budget up to $ 150 K range if you can possibly swing it & you will get what your looking for as far a boat capabilities & size.
You don't need to look out of state to get a good deal on a great trawler. Plenty of those up there in your area.
That is My opinion. Worth all 2 cents.

M.
alfamike is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 10:22 AM   #15
Veteran Member
 
City: Southern California
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeoKa View Post
If there is a trawler, under 100K, between 45-55', is it worth it to bring her up to WA on water by hiring a captain, or truck it over to PNW?
Or, I should not bother and find something around Puget Sound?
Thanks.
A captain is the easiest way - especially on west coast waters going north. San Diego Captains Those guys are great. I've been on board with Nikolay - he's funny and talented. He also wrote a story of a Beneteau delivery you can read here: Captain’s Review – Beneteau Swift Trawler 44 - South Coast Yachts
markajh is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 10:27 AM   #16
TG
Senior Member
 
TG's Avatar
 
City: Oceanside, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Tera Grace
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 178
I saw a yacht hauler on I-5 when I was in Kalama, WA last week. The side of the trailer advertised Joule Yacht Transport | Yacht and Boat Transportation (Joule Yacht Transport).
TG is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 12:46 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
nmuir's Avatar
 
City: West Vancouver
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Redoubt
Vessel Model: 50' Gulf Commander
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 145
We did San Fran to Vancouver (Canada) a few years ago. The boat was a bit too big to truck although that would have been my preference (and my recommendation unless you really want to make the trip). We ran 24/7 with two rotating shifts of 4-6 hours each. Had a single fuel stop in Crescent City to provide lots of fuel contingency - we could have just made Port Angeles without it. We ran 10-20 miles offshore to avoid all the crab pots. We took 5 days to Port Angeles including the overnight fuel stop in Crescent City. PM me if want some more info. We needed to invest some major time and $ into the preparations for the trip, so ensure you factor that into your decision process. Cheers, Neil
nmuir is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 03:01 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
alfamike's Avatar
 
City: Camarillo
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 348
Smile Boat better be in perfect condition sea wortheness wise !

First thing - you better head NMUIR's advise & the boat better be well founded & set up properly. This is a lea shore the whole way north & no place for some weekend bay boat. You better be able to change fuel filters with out turning the engine off. Boat & engine & trans, shaft & prop better be in top condition.
That said here we go.


I can not stress enough what an arduous trip it can sometimes turn out to be going north bound from SF Bay to Straits of Juan de Fuca once your turn north out of San Francisco Bay & head out past Drakes Bay, going around Pt Reyes into the full force of the north Pacific Ocean seas. I have been there & done this myself & have gotten hammered pretty good a time or two & enroute some too once or twice good as well when going up there. Pick your weather window right & it can be a beautiful & fun trip if you don't have a schedule your trying to stick to.

Here is the approximate mileage break down for reference.

SF bay entrance to Pt Reyes -- 28 miles

Pt Reyes to Bodega Bay entrance -- 23 miles

Bodega Bay entrance to Shelter Cove -- 117 miles

Shelter Cove to entrance to Eureka entrance -- 54 miles

Eureka entrance to Crescent City entrance -- 60 miles

Crescent City entrance to Port Orford entrance-- 65 miles

Port Orford entrance to Coos Bay entrance -- 51 miles

Coos Bay entrance to Newport entrance -- 77 miles

Newport entrance to Tillamook entrance - 55 miles

Tillamook entrance to Columbia River light ship @ outer entrance - 40 miles

Columbia River light ship at outer entrance to Grays harbor entrance -- 44 miles

Grays Harbor entrance to Cape Flattery entrance -- 96 miles

Cape Flattery to Port Townsend entrance -- 86 miles

Port Townsend entrance to Seattle entrance -- 40 miles

so there is your trip to Seattle in a nut shell. -- or Approximately 836 miles

Going north - That will take you about 140 hours of running at 6 knots.

Coming south it takes about 120 hours & your can go about 7 knots.

Going north I would figure 3 to 4 gal hour hour to be safe. -- 480 gal plus 10% reserve. So estimate it to be about $ 1,500.oo in fuel costs.

VERY important - Pick your weather window.

Often you need to stop in a harbor & lay over - some times for a day or a couple days, some times a week, maybe even more, so don't have a schedule.

Can be a pretty & fun trip if you don't have a schedule.

I was going north one trip past Mendocino & we had "get there itas" - so we got the snot knocked out of us up there. So be careful as it was not very comfortable.

Sure you don't want to buy a Puget Sound boat that is already up there ?

Keep it safe.

Alfa Mike
alfamike is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 04:17 PM   #19
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,819
I commercial fished the North Pacific. When you're going north, you're going against the California Current. Maybe 1 knot. Most major headlands will have a noticeable ground swell. With the right kind of SW storm winds, really big waves can build up quick. I usually run 25 miles out and try to stay in waters of 1000+ fathoms to avoid the ground swell. I used about 10-15% more fuel going north than going south.
Prevailing swells are from the NW. Weather cycle in the spring/summer seemed to be 3-4 days of 10-20kt NW wind followed by gradual reduction of wind and swell for another 3-4 days. Then a small low with SW winds for a day or two. Then the strong NW winds again. Cycle of about 10 days unless a big storm comes thru.
If you're not in a hurry, you can just do the good days in about 3 weeks. Fishing, I ran in everything but the really bad weather. It's uncomfortable, but you can do it.
Lepke is offline  
Old 06-02-2017, 05:56 PM   #20
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfamike View Post

Here is the approximate mileage break down for reference.

SF bay entrance to Pt Reyes -- 28 miles

Pt Reyes to Bodega Bay entrance -- 23 miles

Bodega Bay entrance to Shelter Cove -- 117 miles

Shelter Cove to entrance to Eureka entrance -- 54 miles

Eureka entrance to Crescent City entrance -- 60 miles

Crescent City entrance to Port Orford entrance-- 65 miles

Port Orford entrance to Coos Bay entrance -- 51 miles

Coos Bay entrance to Newport entrance -- 77 miles

Newport entrance to Tillamook entrance - 55 miles

Tillamook entrance to Columbia River light ship @ outer entrance - 40 miles

Columbia River light ship at outer entrance to Grays harbor entrance -- 44 miles

Grays Harbor entrance to Cape Flattery entrance -- 96 miles

Cape Flattery to Port Townsend entrance -- 86 miles

Port Townsend entrance to Seattle entrance -- 40 miles

so there is your trip to Seattle in a nut shell. -- or Approximately 836 miles

Going north - That will take you about 140 hours of running at 6 knots.

Coming south it takes about 120 hours & your can go about 7 knots.

Going north I would figure 3 to 4 gal hour hour to be safe. -- 480 gal plus 10% reserve. So estimate it to be about $ 1,500.oo in fuel costs.

VERY important - Pick your weather window.

Often you need to stop in a harbor & lay over - some times for a day or a couple days, some times a week, maybe even more, so don't have a schedule.

Can be a pretty & fun trip if you don't have a schedule.

I was going north one trip past Mendocino & we had "get there itas" - so we got the snot knocked out of us up there. So be careful as it was not very comfortable.

Sure you don't want to buy a Puget Sound boat that is already up there ?

Keep it safe.

Alfa Mike
Double for all you've said. Why not make it a true pleasure trip. I'd add another potential stop, between Eureka and Shelter Cove, you have Noyo/Ft. Bragg. It's only 75 nm from Bodega.

Even between Grays Harbor and Cape Flattery there is a possible stop but not one we'd recommend. The only place I'd see you having to run overnight is that leg.

That makes it a fairly easy 14 day trip. Plan on double that and you can really enjoy it. There are some really nice stops along the way.
__________________

BandB is online now  
 

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×