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Old 02-07-2018, 12:39 AM   #1
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What is your "self-sufficient" emergency procedure for a dead engine at sea?

Curious to hear everyone's procedure, if you have one, in the unfortunate instance where you have a dead engine, at sea, and you are unable to diagnose the problem and get it running again. Of course the options are to get assistance/tow from nearby vessel, drop anchor if drifting ashore, and call the CG. But I'm curious to hear if any of you have tried more self-sufficient means to get you to safety such as:

1. Side-tie dinghy while steering from the main helm.
2. Swim platform outfitted with an OB motor bracket
3. Dinghy attached to swim platform on davits but floating in the water, OB motor hard to one side so as to push boat forward... using rudder and/or bow thruster to correct as needed?
4. Sea anchor to slow drift while awaiting assistance

I know some of these are "out there," but in a pinch, I wonder if anyone one of these might work to get you off the rocks or to a nearby dock/buoy/anchorage.

Anyone tried these or have other procedures if you were in this situation?
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Old 02-07-2018, 01:14 AM   #2
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Hi,


In this raw statistics, what usually happens if the engines drives down. More of these can be avoided if you simply want to check before the trip.


10 top causes of engine breakdown - and how to avoid them - Practical Boat Owner


My strategy 1. Anchor, here are only a few areas where so deep that not combining all the ropes from the boat and the anchor would suffice.


2. I have a driving anchor(sea anchor) that slows down the speed and flips the bow towards the waves.


3. VHF requests assistance.


Of course, spare parts and tools will try to figure out the problems yourself if something happens. Therefore, it is better to use the time to check the things in the engine room in advance and try to maintain the best maintenance and cleanliness of the engine room and fuel lines.


Here are also a few points that you can think of and avoid even at sea even if the article concerns the truk.

http://www.trucktrend.com/features/1...g-your-diesel/

NBs
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Old 02-07-2018, 05:06 AM   #3
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I have sails as backup power, although the only time I ever had a mechanical problem that I couldn't fix (starter motor) there wasn't a breath of wind.

It was in a lock so I pushed myself out to open water, thinking I could sort out the problem. After an hour of bobbing around and slowly drifting to the rocky breakwater, I realized I needed a plan C. I swept the rudder back and forth and made slow headway away from the rocks toward a jetty several hundred metres away. It was slow going, maybe 0.1 knots, but I did eventually get there.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:22 AM   #4
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Twins with separate fuel tanks and batteries.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:15 AM   #5
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Paid up tow service membership.
Good ground tackle.
Big VHF antenna.
Comfortable seating.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:17 AM   #6
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None of the dinghy motor options would work for me. I have a Torqueedo 1003 and doubt I could push the Camano at all!

100% of my cruising is within waters that are covered under my BoatUS policy. I will never be going offshore unless I have a buddy boat. If I was "dead in the water" then more than likely I'd be able to anchor and wait it out until BoatUS comes (I'm actually thinking of buying a SeaTow membership too!). I will be buying a sea anchor too (drogue).

Jhance: Did you have any issues last year that made you ask this question? I'm very confident with the Tamd41 and my fuel system after running her for almost 100 hours after purchasing the boat in mid August. I never had any hiccups and actually did 3 round trips last September/October from Boston to Cape Cod (each trip was over 100nm round trip). I've got faith in my old girl! She better not cheat on me this season....Lol
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:51 AM   #7
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- twins spate fuel tanks and batts
- long ground tackle with chain and rode
- sea anchor
- Dinghy can provide a tow

We have pulled numerous folks out of poor situations with the dinghy.
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:09 AM   #8
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Twin engines with separate fuel tanks and electrical systems.
Fuel and electrical systems can be combined or isolated as needed.
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:43 AM   #9
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Start the wing engine.
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:51 AM   #10
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Your question is probably more appropriate for blue water passagemakers without easy help from TowBoat or others. In time critical coastal situations where say you are drifting towards a rock jetty, maybe the dinghy motor would keep you off, but only in flat water and in that situation, dropping the anchor would be quicker and more likely to stop you.

But 99% of the time just call TowBoat or Seatow and wait for help.

David
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Old 02-07-2018, 09:55 AM   #11
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We have a 9.9hp outboard permanently mounted to the swim step on a bracket which allows the outboard to swing sideways for storage on the swim step.

There are no tow services where I live, some inlets are so twisty and mountainous that they have no radio reception, we can go days without seeing another boat, and anchoring while drifting is pretty much impossible when the majority of shoreline in this area dives steeply to around 1000 feet.

Have never had to use it for an emergency, so far...
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Old 02-07-2018, 10:30 AM   #12
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anchor and road for 200'+ depths
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I follow a meticulous maintenance schedule, have extensive spares, have the required tools, and the know how to facilitate most of the repairs.

Cruising a single engine boat is like flying my single engine aircraft. Do the preventative maintenance; watch the weather; avoid most situations where engine failure will be life threatening.

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Old 02-07-2018, 12:12 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South of Heaven View Post
None of the dinghy motor options would work for me. I have a Torqueedo 1003 and doubt I could push the Camano at all!

100% of my cruising is within waters that are covered under my BoatUS policy. I will never be going offshore unless I have a buddy boat. If I was "dead in the water" then more than likely I'd be able to anchor and wait it out until BoatUS comes (I'm actually thinking of buying a SeaTow membership too!). I will be buying a sea anchor too (drogue).

Jhance: Did you have any issues last year that made you ask this question? I'm very confident with the Tamd41 and my fuel system after running her for almost 100 hours after purchasing the boat in mid August. I never had any hiccups and actually did 3 round trips last September/October from Boston to Cape Cod (each trip was over 100nm round trip). I've got faith in my old girl! She better not cheat on me this season....Lol
No issues, but I want to be ready with a backup plan for such situations.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:15 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smitty477 View Post
- twins spate fuel tanks and batts
- long ground tackle with chain and rode
- sea anchor
- Dinghy can provide a tow

We have pulled numerous folks out of poor situations with the dinghy.
I have a RIB with a 9.9 Honda. I tried pulling a small section of heavy dock with it and it was impossible. I have not tried pulling the Camano with it though... maybe I'll give that a practice try.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:20 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Your question is probably more appropriate for blue water passagemakers without easy help from TowBoat or others. In time critical coastal situations where say you are drifting towards a rock jetty, maybe the dinghy motor would keep you off, but only in flat water and in that situation, dropping the anchor would be quicker and more likely to stop you.

But 99% of the time just call TowBoat or Seatow and wait for help.

David
In my opinion, breaking down in blue water (assuming conditions are calm) is not nearly as dangerous as breaking down when you are near shore cruising like in the San Juans, Gulf Islands, etc. If you break down here, you may very well be on the rocks in a matter of minutes. Blue water breakdown you'll have time to make a new pot of coffee!
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:22 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by jhance View Post
I have a RIB with a 9.9 Honda. I tried pulling a small section of heavy dock with it and it was impossible. I have not tried pulling the Camano with it though... maybe I'll give that a practice try.
I am not sure what 9.9 will do - we have had a lot more Hp on our past 3 RIBS.
With a good angle of attack we have found that pulling folks off of rocks and deep mud was not too hard - need a long tow rope so you stay clear of the problem. Towing in open water much easier.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:23 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
We have a 9.9hp outboard permanently mounted to the swim step on a bracket which allows the outboard to swing sideways for storage on the swim step.

There are no tow services where I live, some inlets are so twisty and mountainous that they have no radio reception, we can go days without seeing another boat, and anchoring while drifting is pretty much impossible when the majority of shoreline in this area dives steeply to around 1000 feet.

Have never had to use it for an emergency, so far...
Interesting. That's a great backup plan and very functional. Do you have a dinghy with a separate motor then? Any issues with swamping the 9.9 with waves astern?
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:33 PM   #18
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The one time my engine failed (due to a corroded through exhaust riser fitting), I jury rigged using aluminum foil and stainless wire to give me 4-5 minutes for the final approach to the marina. Other than that I launched the dinghy and hip towed the boat. I was able to maintain about 4 knots and had enough gas for maybe 15-20 miles. The only problem I had was when I was passed very closely by a 65' black boat throwing a huge wake that very nearly swamped my dinghy. Very distinctive paint job on that boat - black hull with orange stripe.
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Old 02-07-2018, 01:56 PM   #19
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1. maintain everything and carry spares
2. come home on one engine
3. hip tow with my 20hp tender
4. triangle hitch my 1 hp ice eater off the bow and fire up the genny (3.5 Knots) yes, it really works.
5. anchor and call for a tow.
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Old 02-07-2018, 03:08 PM   #20
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4. triangle hitch my 1 hp ice eater off the bow and fire up the genny (3.5 Knots) yes, it really works w.
Now thatís out-of-the-box thinking!
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