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Old 09-09-2017, 07:28 PM   #1
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Successful 1st Solo Run

With the head projects complete it was time to try singlehandling my Troll. Putted to the fuel dock at the next marina to get in my first fueling and then headed out briefly into the Chesapeake before going back to my creek to practice a slow maneuvers. Couldn't get her to steer to starboard in reverse against the wind but otherwise things felt ok.

I nosed her in instead of backing into the alley like all the sailboats. Used the bow thrust to swing her bow to port as I was sliding slowly past my slip and backed her in. It is a fairly snug slip so I backed her most of way in then went to work on the lines versus using a spring line. Need to work on that later. My dock lines are left on the pilings but I have a pair on each side when underway. Nice and easy first experience.
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Old 09-09-2017, 08:00 PM   #2
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"Couldn't get her to steer to starboard in reverse against the wind but otherwise things felt ok. "

That's why you have a bow thruster. Your boat won't really steer in reverse because steering depends on water flowing over the rudder and that doesn't really happen in reverse.

Search the web for information on handling single screw inboards of look it up in books.
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:39 AM   #3
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Thats great Milton. Congrats. Im thoroughly enjoying my new Camano. Ive already put on 30 hours since mid August! Everyday Im learning more about her handling and docking characteristics. Im still having a problem with my stern in docking but I haven't hit anything or had any major issues. It just takes me longer than it should. A big tip I learned was to be in neutral A LOT and then let the wind and bow thruster help you. If you're in gear for too long you're gonna go way to fast to correct any course issues
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Old 09-10-2017, 02:16 PM   #4
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Yep caught myself dstaying in gear too long a few times. Got that out of my system out in creek though, I think. Just glad to get past the initial fear of running her solo.
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:24 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesK View Post
"Couldn't get her to steer to starboard in reverse against the wind but otherwise things felt ok. "

That's why you have a bow thruster. Your boat won't really steer in reverse because steering depends on water flowing over the rudder and that doesn't really happen in reverse.

Search the web for information on handling single screw inboards of look it up in books.
A bit confused. I am of the school that says prop walk in reverse will dictate the motion of the boat. While wind and tide play can play a part, how you apply the use of 'prop walk' will define how the boat will react.
The following video posted earlier today on another forum thread will demonstrate the power of 'prop walk'. This is a severe application demonstration but makes the point.



Learn how your boat reacts in reverse. If you are right hand rotation going ahead, the stern of the boat will swing to the port in reverse and conversely, if your left hand rotation going ahead, then your stern will swing to the starboard in reverse.

Practice along side a open face dock or float on your left (Port) side. Come in at a slow speed at about 30 degrees and when somewhat close, place you boat in reverse. Example- If your engine is right hand rotation, (Clock wise) then when you go into reverse the prop will now turn anti-clock wise or to the port sucking the stern into the float or dock. Did I say to retain the rudder in the 30 degree angle? Do so as the prop wash will push against the starboard side of the rudder adding thrust to the prop wash and assisting the movement towards the float or dock.In the video huge amounts of rudder movement is made due to the speeds of the action.) With practice you will then be able to move into a slotted moorage knowing to which side of the mooring you will move in reverse.
Now all of these does in deed require the operator to seek the flow of wind and tide. This operator coming into a harbor, will place the boat in neutral and allow the boat to seek direction. Once flow and direction is determined then the above rudder use will be governed. Approach aggressive, or passive (recommended). From up wind (recommended) or down wind. Of course the location of the ultimate mooring has a bearing on all the movements. Take care. Trust that if this suggested application is flawed others will offer constructive criticism. We all can learn from others experiences.

Charge ahead, don't let apprehension over rule your efforts.

EDITING FOR : While the reason for leaving the rudder in the 30 degrees above is noted, in actual mooring application, I actually have the rudder swung a mite to the Port. Then if forward movement is required to relocate the stern a small amount of forward power will kick the stern away from the dock and then when back in reverse the stern is positioned a more favorable direction to the mooring direction. wheu! I didn't know docking in reverse could be so consuming!!

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Old 09-11-2017, 02:01 AM   #6
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When maneuvering in reverse, I rely heavily on the bow thruster. Saves on the transmission and rudder movement.
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Old 09-11-2017, 07:22 AM   #7
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Milton: On a different note, it seems that for now you're not using the boat too much. If thats the case then I'd suggest that you at least start the motor a few times a week and let her run for a while. My mechanic told me that diesels dont like inactivity.
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:18 AM   #8
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Running an engine at dock a few times a week I think is overkill.

While running under load till the engine hits operating temp for an hour or so is a common goal....it can be done at the dock in gear.

You have to be careful about running at the dock and many marinas dont allow it.

When at the dock, 2 schools of thought are common.

First is run it just long enough to get oil pressure up and change positions of many moving parts .

The second is get her up to max oil (not coolant) temp for at least long enough to drive out moisture. No one really can tell you how long that is.

Every 2 weeks is probably more than enough for running at the dock. If you arent going to use the engine for many months at a time, the are long term storage methods available that are better than occasional running.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:50 AM   #9
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A bit confused. I am of the school that says prop walk in reverse will dictate the motion of the boat. ..........
Prop walk can have an effect on a boat's handling, but mostly at higher speeds. The video is interesting and impressive but most of us don't operate like that or enter docking contests. At my home marina and at most of the transient marinas I have visited, there are too many things to hit to be operating like that. And too many concerned boat owners and dock masters.

We all do what works best for us. Obviously, if you don't have a bow thruster, you'll have to do something else. With an available bow thruster, this is the easiest and safest way for most of us.
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:07 AM   #10
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I've noticed my tug is pretty clumsy propeller walking, whether long keel slow down walking sideways?
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:12 AM   #11
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Running an engine at dock a few times a week I think is overkill.

While running under load till the engine hits operating temp for an hour or so is a common goal....it can be done at the dock in gear.

You have to be careful about running at the dock and many marinas dont allow it.

When at the dock, 2 schools of thought are common.

First is run it just long enough to get oil pressure up and change positions of many moving parts .

The second is get her up to max oil (not coolant) temp for at least long enough to drive out moisture. No one really can tell you how long that is.

Every 2 weeks is probably more than enough for running at the dock. If you arent going to use the engine for many months at a time, the are long term storage methods available that are better than occasional running.

I think block heater could keep the engines warm and protect it from moisture
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:18 AM   #12
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Thanks for the Input

Thanks for all the input folks. Will continue to see what I can accomplish with propwalk to avoid dependancy on the thruster.

I have been on the boat most weekends since I bought her but needed to complete a few projects and wait for the boat traffic to die down a little. 13 nights aboard since July 21st. There are a lot of very active sailboats in my marina and I wanted to practice without being a roadblock. Wind was also a factor two of weekends I planned to run her solo.

Now I have fuel and things have quieted down a little so I should get out more frequently. I am not in any rush and look forward to some fall and early winter runs. This 'test' is as much about learning whether I can live aboard as much as enjoying running the boat which is a given.
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
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Prop walk can have an effect on a boat's handling, but mostly at higher speeds. The video is interesting and impressive but most of us don't operate like that or enter docking contests.
We all do what works best for us. Obviously, if you don't have a bow thruster, you'll have to do something else. With an available bow thruster, this is the easiest and safest way for most of us.
Hi Wes- I cropped your comments to respond. Here is what I had stated related to the video:
"The following video posted earlier today on another forum thread will demonstrate the power of 'prop walk'. This is a severe application demonstration but makes the point.

On "Speed for maneuvering" to utilize rudder action.
I respectfully disagree. Single screw boats will react to prop action of the direction of the turning at very low speed. While there are times that agressive approachs are in order, the vast majority of maneuvering is done at RPM of 500-800 range. Short burst to make adjustments or stop moving progress are often in order.

This information offered relates to single screw boats without any form of thruster. The intent is to offer encouragement in practice. It is moments of pride if not just joy, in nailing a perfect landing. Looking professional in doing so will give the fullest pleasure of boating. Not meant to discount t-hose who are benefited with aids that make the job easier. Any good landing made with what ever aids available is the goal.

I just added a Comnav 1240 auto pilot on our boat. I had never had one. It was only minutes into the first operation that I knew boating had taken on a new exciting chapter. I am guessing having the various thruster operations available has the same exciting reaction to a operator. Same with the process of docking.

Enjoying the thread Educational topics are neat!
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:01 PM   #14
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I've noticed my tug is pretty clumsy propeller walking, whether long keel slow down walking sideways?
Yep, a long deep keel may affect the maneuvering. A large rudder which is usually the case with deep keeled/hulled boats, has an effect. Our larger commercial fishing boats, (50-75 foot) often use a 2-3 knot approach to mooring and with timings learned over time, know when to reverse with a burst of power. This action overcomes the charistrics you discribe, allowing the prop walk to take effect sucking the stern into correct position to hand the mooring line to the dock, or step off and secure it.
I am under the impression from your post that this is NOT in your docking process. Understand.
Have to admit watching the described action above never fails to impress as professional docking action is accomplished.

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Old 09-11-2017, 11:31 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Yep, a long deep keel may affect the maneuvering. A large rudder which is usually the case with deep keeled/hulled boats, has an effect. Our larger commercial fishing boats, (50-75 foot) often use a 2-3 knot approach to mooring and with timings learned over time, know when to reverse with a burst of power. This action overcomes the charistrics you discribe, allowing the prop walk to take effect sucking the stern into correct position to hand the mooring line to the dock, or step off and secure it.
I am under the impression from your post that this is NOT in your docking process. Understand.
Have to admit watching the described action above never fails to impress as professional docking action is accomplished.

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I'm still a student single screw, the training continues, thanks to tips
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:43 AM   #16
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Any updates Milton? Have you taken the boat out? My season is quickly to an end! It gets cold in Boston by mid November. I'll be hauling my boat out in 3 weeks.....
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:10 AM   #17
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Got a couple of 35 mile day cruises in

About a month back, I took her up the Severn River including a few scenic side creeks. Had my sister onboard for that trip. A little sloppy backing her in but no harm done and I knew what I did wrong. A few weeks ago I took her out to the Thomas Point Lighthouse and then up the South River and checked out a nice anchorage and a few creeks. That trip was solo and backed her in perfectly that time. Eventually I will screw up with some unexpected winds but at least getting the stupid goofs cleaned up.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:04 PM   #18
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Hey Milton, your boat is still listed on Yachtworld as "sale pending". Tell the broker to delete it! Lol

2003 Camano Troll 31 Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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