Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-05-2019, 08:24 PM   #1021
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Florida
Country: usa
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,059
Doesn't seem like you folks leave the slip much...
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Jack ...Chicken of the sea! 1600 ton Master of towing/Oceans. 1600 ton Master/Oceans.
Sailor of Fortune is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2019, 10:39 PM   #1022
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Leaving the dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
Doesn't seem like you folks leave the slip much...
Actually just the opposite, the past eight weeks or so we have taken the boat out about eight times, just have not been posting much lately. Sometimes we take her out after work, anchor for dinner then back as the sun sets. It's been a good spring for us despite the May / June gray overcast that doesn't clear up until around 3:00pm. Glade that's begin us for another year.
__________________

N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2019, 05:43 PM   #1023
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Boat Design

My wife never gets involved in boat design or why things work the way they do but yesterday she did become interested. We we're heading out of the long channel to open ocean and it was a little breezy (15 -20 knots). The swells we're small but we had a short two foot chop. As we cleared the protection of Point Loma we could feel the breeze at full force on our starboard side. At the same time Mary was watching a fifty something motoryacht that was alongside us start to rock and roll then turn around as we continued. She asked why was the boat moving so much and we weren't?

I explained there are likely two primary reasons, 1) the boat doesn't have stabilizers to which she responded "we don't either" and 2) boat design. I told her to look at how tall and boxy the yacht was and how that much surface area acts as a sail and catches all the wind. I reminded her the time we went for a sailboat ride and how all the wind went over us and the boat didn't move. Same situation with our boat which is a well thought out "low profile PH" design. We catch some wind but compared to the tall Nordhavns we owned with round hulls we just don't roll as much with this hull. I went on to explain how we use the little extra speed we have to help keep the ride more comfortable.
We continued out for awhile with Mary driving as I adjusted speed for changes in angle of attack of the waves and swells. She quickly realized how just a little more speed and change in direction can make a big difference with larger swells coming from passing boats It was a great couple of hours out on the water and a small learning lesson for Mary. Docking in this breeze with a strong current was "let's say fun".

John
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2019, 10:16 PM   #1024
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
A shift from the norm

Many people know that we designed a custom salon interior on the boat for one important reason - to build a boat that supports how we planned to use her 90% of the time. I call this the 90% rule and something we have lived by with all our boats the past 30 years. So when we decided to build our H38E we knew it would be Mary and I (and Sailor Blue) aboard 90% of the time and we would be spending alot of time aboard as we experienced the ICW. While we have been limited to southern California since taking delivery of the boat, we have achieved our plan of only us aboard 90% of the time and our interior layout has proven a winner.

Then the 10% time arrived and Mary got nervous. We had family planning to spend the day aboard and we offered to let them spend the night with us. Mary decided we should remove the ottomans and put a high /low table in the salon against my recommendation. Next thing I know I'm receiving a table at the boat the morning of our weekend aboard and I found myself moving the ottomans to storage. After our visitors arrived and got settled in we took off for a cruise and found everyone in the PH where the views were best. A few hours later we were back at the dock and settled in for the evening. Dinner was served in the PH were we normally eat and watch TV. When it was time to call it a night I ended up moving the salon table (we never used) onto the aft deck and bringing back the two ottomans which partially fills in the salon sofa to create a large playpen for two people (and one small dog). Our guests spent a very comfortable night aboard in the salon with their own private bathroom while enjoyed the night in the OSR. The next morning we all had coffee in the salon using the ottoman covers turned upside down with their varnished spruce wood finish as tables. We turned a one stateroom boat into a two stateroom boat with no effort. Wow, it worked as planned.

While I would like to take credit for our custom layout I have to admit I borrowed this layout from a few larger Nordhavns which use a similar design on boats planning to cross oceans and require maximum open floor space and optional use of areas. I remember seeing our layout on a new N55 a few years back and discussing its concept with the owner who explained that extended time aboard requires maximum mixed us over area of the boat and as much "open floor space" as possible.

Following our 90% rule and listening to those who are much more experienced has resulted in what we believe and proved to be the best salon layout for anyone looking to spend serious time aboard.

When we build our next boat you can bet we will repeat this design.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2019, 12:02 AM   #1025
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by N4061 View Post

Following our 90% rule and listening to those who are much more experienced has resulted in what we believe and proved to be the best salon layout for anyone looking to spend serious time aboard.

When we build our next boat you can bet we will repeat this design.
Wifey B: Whatever your 90% is, the rule still is advisable. We plan for more people but we don't worry about the maximum we might have. Twice we've had many fly in and ended up with more than we could sleep so gotten hotel rooms in Montreal and in Key West. As far as cruising with extra and having nights along the way we've found some of us are quite amenable to air mattresses. Highly recommend them. It's like olden days when people threw quilts on the floor and called them pallets or something like that I think but these are actually comfy and easy to store in deflated mode.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2019, 12:28 PM   #1026
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Salon Layout

BB, agree the hotel option can work well for visitors while at the dock.

Another great design feature of the two bathroom H38E is engine room access. The H38 offers two separate ER access entry points, through the day head and engine hatch in the PH. I use the day head access to perform ER checks and it works great!

While we had visitors aboard the other day the day head sliding door became jammed shut (first time this occurred). I tried everything to unlock it and even started to unscrew the latch then thought why not try the other side of the door. I rolled back the carpet from the ER hatch in PH and simply walked down the built in ladder to the front of the engine and entered the day head through the ER access door. With access to the door locking latch I was able to unlock the door and life was good. Just another great design aspect of this boat.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2019, 08:42 PM   #1027
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
A Change In The Weather?

After a few weeks of summer heat and humidity (granted this is San Diego styled weather and less significant than other states) it was nice to enjoy the boat (Friday night dinner aboard) with a cool breeze and reminiscent of winter weather.

Am I just getting older or spoiled with SD weather? As a kid growing up on Long Island, NY we longed for summer and hot weather. Boating was always better in the heat of summer. I felt the same after moving to southern California and enjoying warmer weather year round the past 30 years. Why then did I find this years summer unenjoyably compared to others and looking for cooler weather? Last weekend we found ourselves inside the boat running the AC all afternoon. Today we have the doors and windows open enjoying the cool breeze and looking forward to more of this cooler weather. Even checked how many sweatshirts we have aboard.

Are we still the same couple who want to enjoy Mexico and the ICW during the hot summer days or have we turned into PNW weather boaters?

Strange and interesting to say the least. At least we have the right boat for either climate!
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2019, 09:46 PM   #1028
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Like old times

It's been awhile since we spent a night aboard but with a change in the weather to cooler days and evenings we decided to break up the week and spend the night aboard. Driving to the boat after work reminded me of the old days when lived aboard our N40's part time Monday - Thursdays for a few years. While we are not ready to return to the old days it's nice having a comfortable boat which offers the option.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2019, 10:33 AM   #1029
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
An uncomfortable trip

So we decided to head outside and north into the seas that weren’t forecasted to be too bad (2’ - 3’) on the bow. Once we rounded Point Loma we found ourselves in short 3’ - 4’ with occasional 5’ waves. It reminded me of a 12 hour trip heading north from Ensenada Mexico a few years back (not fun).

A few comparisons on the different boats. The biggest difference I felt was the slightly less amount of pitching motion or at least the feeling it was less on the H38. I contribute this to lower profile design of the PH. Less pounding into the waves due to the hull entry design being sharper. The fact we were going directly into the waves confirmed that not having stabilizers didn’t matter. On the N40 with Trac stabilization they didn’t help. On this run Mary wasn’t feeling all that great and retreated to the aft salon to rest. Unlike the N40 where she had to stretch out on the floor with our boat she and Sailor Blue had the large sofa with both ottomans to stretch out and get comfortable. After about an hour she shouted out “you better make sure the next boat has this same layout like the big Nordies”. Sailor Blue barked as if she was agreeing. After a few hours we turned into the harbor getting pushed around with beam seas (missed the Tracs) and tied up. The boat did great.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2019, 12:51 PM   #1030
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Baja HaHa Time

The past few weeks around San Diego have been busy with many boats (sail and power) joining together and preparing for two separate trips south. The first is annual Baja HaHa sailboat run from SD to La Paz, Mexico. While the exact number of entries this year is not known they usually include around 30 plus boats. About 15 years ago the trawler folks decided why should the sail boaters have all the fun the first ever FUBAR run was coordinated and approximately 24 power boats headed south a week later. The FUBAR was slightly more coordinated with support staff and events but both events accomplish the same goal of cruising 1,000 miles in the safety of others. The FUBAR recently changed its name to CUBAR and occurs every other year. It was our goal to have the new boat ready for this years run but missed the window. We will see what happens in the future and if we can make the 2021 run south.

We met with a few trawler owners getting ready for their trip and was impressed with their level of preparation. They all took this trip seriously and weren’t taking anything to chance. Their boats ranged in size from 40’ and up and those I spoke with had capable boats. We had few stop by our boat to see their first Helmsman and their comments were all positive. For most captains our separate ER access door through the day head and space around the Engine was at the top of their list. Everyone was impressed with the openness and salon layout with many commenting they couldn’t believe the boat was only 38’. In fact one N43 owners wife told her husband “this salon is lager then ours”. The next most talked about feature of the boat was the PH seating area. We had the owner of another brand 64’ comment the H38 may become his next boat after the CUBAR as he wants something smaller he can single handle. Overall it was a great week to see and talk boats with new friends and feel the excitement in the air. We wish all those heading south calm seas and fair winds!
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 10:30 AM   #1031
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Annual Maintenance

Maintenance on any boat is as critical to safety and enjoyment as is the quality of the boat itself. We have been fortunate to own boats known for their high quality workmanship and designs which makes maintenance a little easier. This past week we had the engine zincs replaced and the had the mechanic perform a general inspection of the the entire engine.
It was reassuring to confirm the inspection didn’t uncover anything requiring attention and we were good for another year.

It was also interesting to hear the mechanics positive comments regarding the room in ER and access to everything. He was surprised to see a ER access door in a 38’ and used it instead of the ladder in PH just because it was there.

While these types of positive comments are the norm on this boat they are always welcome.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 11:26 AM   #1032
Guru
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 810
Another Year

It’s hard to believe we are closing in on yet another year boating. Within the last two weeks the CUBAR and Baha Haha fleets have left for warmer waters and the San Diego Boat Christmas Parade is less than a month away. Not sure where 2019 went but one thing for sure is we didn’t do the amount of boating we had planned for. While the times we did spend aboard were all great and we keep adding to our boating memories we do feel like we are missing out on the true adventures we still want to experience while we have the health and means.

This got us to talking about the next boat, budget and retirement plans again. We are not wealthy but have been fortunate to own some great boats over the years which we made possible because I’m still working. Once I retire the boating budget will become significantly smaller thus the need to “do it now” concept raises up to the top of our decision process list. With all this being said we decided to lower the price of our boat beyond the point I would ever consider (someone will get a great deal) so that we can move forward with building the next boat in hopes we can make the Cabo run next November. Yes we are chasing the calendar and 12 months is not a long time to complete the design, build and commission our next boat but we are all in. This decision also results in me working a couple of extra years (I just turned 59) but life is too short not be out boating. Our plans (soft as they are) include the trip south before turning around and visiting Alaska the following summer then back south to SD for one year before taking the boat through the Panama Canal to the east coast. If we are successful with this plan I will be content with boating then retire. OK, I’ll still buy another boat but a lot smaller.
N4061 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 02:35 PM   #1033
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,275
Interesting as you weigh priorities. That's something all have to do but they change and the factors influencing them change each year we live.

We plan for the future but we're all pretty bad at predicting it.

I use to laugh at those who would ask in interviews "Where do you see yourself in five (or ten) years?" Two days ago, I didn't see myself where I am today but the sea conditions changed. That's the way of life. None of the best moments of my life have ever been anticipated or predicted or even planned, as they actually turned out.

Having the wisdom to think ahead is important and probably plan A, B, C, D and the rest of the alphabet. Having the wisdom to change those plans is even more so.

Good luck selling your boat and moving on to the next.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2019, 08:06 PM   #1034
Guru
 
City: Pembroke
Country: Canada
Vessel Model: Helmsman Camano among several
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 537
The old saying goes:

“Want to make God laugh? Tell him your plans”

Such is life...
__________________

Durant F is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×