Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-05-2022, 11:24 AM   #21
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Black Dog
Vessel Model: Formula 41PC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 16,362
Sounds to me like you arenít really ready to buy at this point. So what I would suggest is to just look at as many boats as you can. Try to decide what type of boat you think you want to buy. I would consider chartering a boat for a week or so just to learn what you like and donít like. Donít worry yet about surveys and closing, etc. First you have to decide what you want. Then when the time gets closer to when you want to actually buy a boat, learn about that process. If you charter a boat when you are in marinas look at other boats and if the owners are friendly ask to see the boat. I always am happy to show people our boat. That way you can learn more about what you like or donít like. You can ask the owners what they like and donít like about their boats.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 01:26 PM   #22
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,685
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
my opinion your first look at a boat is just that a first look.

that is the time when you and your spouse walk through the boat and just look at things. This is not a detailed examination of maintenance logs or anything like that. That kind of stuff comes later if you're serious about buying the boat.

this is a walk-through looking at the general condition and seeing if you like the layout. you're getting an idea how well the boat was maintained just by its condition visually.

The questions to ask at this point are things like the size of the engines what is the cruise speed of the boat. What size are the water tanks and fuel tanks that type of thing. again you're looking at general condition and getting a feel for in general how new things are on the boat hasn't had continuous upgrading for example.

then later if you decide that you're very serious about this boat and are contemplating making an offer then and only then you ask for the detailed maintenance logs and you really look over the boat very carefully and write down things you do not like

then you make an offer based on everything you know about the boat and everything you could see making an assumption that what you cannot see is all functional and that there is no hidden damage or defects.

The amount of money you offer for the boat reflects anything visual that you can see that is a defect in the boat. In my opinion it is unethical to return to the negotiating table for things that you could see as your casual observer of the boat.
Great post and 100% correct.
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 01:42 PM   #23
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,685
We knew ASD was the right boat when I came out of the engine room and the Admiral came out of the back bedroom. We looked at each other and said "WOW."

We had looked at hundreds and hundreds of boats.

Good luck. Best advice I can give you is this:

Buy a boat using your head, not an emotional heart.
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 01:47 PM   #24
Guru
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
City: Bethesda, MD
Vessel Name: Solstice
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47 Eastbay FB
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
Sounds to me like you arenít really ready to buy at this point. So what I would suggest is to just look at as many boats as you can. Try to decide what type of boat you think you want to buy.
Spend the money to fly to a boat show that has a lot of inventory. Spend several days doing walk-throughs on various makes/models. Nothing helps build your understanding of options like seeing them in-person. No amount of videos or online literature ever comes close to that.

In my opinion, what you need to be looking for are NOT the "features that would be nice to have". What you should be looking for are things YOU DO NOT WANT.

For me it was a flybridge that didn't have those gawd-awful tiny steps and/or an easily breakable acrylic hatch. My priority is being able to get up/down/around the boat without undue risk of injury or guests breaking something. That alone narrowed the selection down quite a bit.

So as you look at a lot of boats, start to get some ideas about things that would annoy/bother you if you had to deal with them all the time. Just keep your negativity to yourself while your on the boats, or talking with brokers selling them. Just don't let yourself be talked into accepting it.

Quote:
I would consider chartering a boat for a week or so just to learn what you like and donít like. Donít worry yet about surveys and closing, etc. First you have to decide what you want. Then when the time gets closer to when you want to actually buy a boat, learn about that process. If you charter a boat when you are in marinas look at other boats and if the owners are friendly ask to see the boat. I always am happy to show people our boat. That way you can learn more about what you like or donít like. You can ask the owners what they like and donít like about their boats.
Excellent advice. Never be afraid to ask other owners of the same kind of boat what has been their greatest set of problems/challenges with it. Though you may not be able to do that of the seller of a particular one you're considering... but other owners are out there and will likely be able to chime in.
__________________
-- Bill Kearney
2005 Eastbay 47 FB - Solstice, w/Highfield CL360 tender
wkearney99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 05:39 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Delta Riverat's Avatar
 
City: Stockton
Vessel Name: Dream Catcher
Vessel Model: 1979 Island Gypsy 44 Flush Aft Deck
Join Date: Feb 2022
Posts: 138
I agree, ease of access is a biggie. Getting around any boat is harder than a house with tight passages and limited head room.
Delta Riverat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 06:01 PM   #26
Guru
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
City: Bethesda, MD
Vessel Name: Solstice
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47 Eastbay FB
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta Riverat View Post
I agree, ease of access is a biggie. Getting around any boat is harder than a house with tight passages and limited head room.
Ease of access for things you and passengers aboard will use.

I'm sure some would love to detour the conversation into long, drawn-out diatribes about engine room access. Depends a lot on your physical state and comfort level for doing engine room tasks. If you're not already inclined to be crawling around an engine room you probably won't want/need to have it on your list.

I generally think of access as how readily can you get from the controls to the gunwales for docking or other handling issues.

Likewise, some modern boats with all kinds of squared corners and fancy surfaces look great.... until the boat is heaving in rough seas and you get a bruised kidney whacking against those edges as you (or passengers) try to move around. Cabinets that actually latch shut are likewise good to have.
__________________
-- Bill Kearney
2005 Eastbay 47 FB - Solstice, w/Highfield CL360 tender
wkearney99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 06:12 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Delta Riverat's Avatar
 
City: Stockton
Vessel Name: Dream Catcher
Vessel Model: 1979 Island Gypsy 44 Flush Aft Deck
Join Date: Feb 2022
Posts: 138
That's what I mean. I have a maximum of 4 steps anywhere. 2 up from the entries to the aft deck, 4 up to the fly bridge, 4 down to the saloon, 4 down saloon to for and aft cabins and heads.

The flybridge steps are so easy you can go down them facing aft and I do all the time. Makes life on board easier -
Delta Riverat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 07:58 PM   #28
Guru
 
AlanT's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: MoonShadow
Vessel Model: Wendon Skylounge 72'
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 606
Tons of good advice here so I wont add to the pile. I noticed you proposed asking "does everything work". I suggest you change that question a little. If you asked me that question my knee jerk reaction would be "yes".

However if you ask what is currently causing a problem or broken or soon needs replacing on the boat you will hopefully get a thoughtful and more useful response (you would from me!).

In your price range the problems that you will not be able to visually identify by a thorough walkthrough will be engines/drive train and structural integrity. You can smell problems with the heads, mold/damp. You can identify prior or current leaks from stains. You can judge what needs updating from cosmetics to instrumentation to electronics to galley. So do your work on the walk through (which should be a long walkthrough (or a return visit) on a shortlisted boat), then hire an engine and a general survey. Both are needed IMO.
AlanT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 08:31 PM   #29
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
Sage advice as always, lady and gentlemen. I got so used to one line smartass answers/replies on social media, I forgot how much better discussion boards are for this kind of discourse. Man, I missed this format.

So once again, replying to all in one, so here we go!

If we lived within a reasonable distance of where the boats we want are, we'd be out walking docks every weekend and chatting up owners. My aforementioned trip to Maine is not to see these boats, but spend time with my family and meet my two nieces that were born during the pandemic, whom I haven't met yet. It was only a few days ago that it crossed my mind that'll I'll be close to the boats, so why not go put eyes on them to give a slight validation for all the hard work we've put in over the past two years to move towards this goal. Pictures and day dreams are one thing; seeing in person will probably light a fire under us to pick the pace up and work harder. Once we sell the houses here in UT, we will be staying with family in Maine while we go on our active search, but as to minimize travel time and burden on family. We don't want to be living at my parents house any longer than my parents want us living there. It's not that we're not welcome, but I think most of us can understand what I'm getting at. Right now, going to see ANY boat is considerable effort and is beyond what we have time for. It'd still be a stretch from Maine, but at least we're on the right coast and within a few hours flight from anything east of the Mississippi.

Someone mentioned chartering a trawler. We'd rather put that money towards education and training to start because there'll be plenty of cruising afterwards. Competency breeds confidence, which lowers stress, which builds more confidence and increases enjoyment. The sooner we can safely and comfortably enjoy it, the better.

No, I absolutely am not assuming all brokers are sheisters. I expect used car salesmen to be, but not a broker that caters to a clientele that are able to spend six figures on a depreciating asset. My personal approach to all people in all settings is that they start at 100% and their actions and words will determine where they end up on that scale. Many stay at 100%, some go over it (Pau Hana is one of them), and many drop well below what I'd consider the baseline of what I'm willing to put up with.

How we landed on a 53 Hatteras... They've withstood the test of time and earned a reputation for being some of the most battle-tested war wagons in the price range we're in. The layout is, in our opinion, the best use of available living space, or at least what we've been able to extrapolate from the listings online. There's room to work on stuff without twisting yourself into a pretzel and access to other things like electrical and pneudraulic systems. We like the idea of a lower helm and the immediate deck access it provides. Regarding side deck access for line handling and a cockpit for water access, that's why I'm including the MY and YF in the list. We're both in our mid 40's and are in good enough shape to be OK with a ladder to get to the swim platform, but acknowledge that in time we may want stairs with a railing and some gunwals to stand inside of. Re: line handling... I have talked with a few MY and ED owners over on the HOF and the MY owners make it sound like an ED is impossible to bring in without a crew on the dock waiting to catch lines, while the ED owners say it's not as easy as a MY, but it's not hard by any means and can be single handed in an emergency. I saw a listing recently where the owner of the ED has one of those stairways that hang off the side of the boat on a pivot and pulley system and lowers it like a ramp once next to the dock. I figure, one of us rigs the lines and fenders and sets up the stairs during the approach, and when brought in to dock, deploys the stairs, ties off the spring lines followed by the stern line, and then whoever's at the helm goes forward to toss the bow line down. But if there's different or better ways, we are wide open to trying them to see what works best for us. I have digressed. We like how big the windows are, the the full size appliances, a master big enough for a king mattress, and we like the use of space on the bridge. Also important are the three staterooms and heads. We don't want to run a charter with the boat, but we do want to have a comfortable place for the family and friends to stay during the occasional visit. Since we'll be summering near family in Maine more often than not, it'd be nice to have room for them to join us for a dinner cruise and an overnight on the hook somewhere in Casco Bay. Then there's the tankage, the room for cold and dry storage, spares, tools, supplies, ect. A draft of 4' will make poking around the gunk holes a little less stressful, and the deep keel provides what I'd consider a fair amount of protection but twins are more susceptible to damage than a single; it is what it is. My wife is far more sensitive to rolling than pitching so stabilizers are a requirement, no question. What we've seen over the past few years is that it's rare to find an ED without them and a YF or MY with them. We'd rather deal with designing and fabricating a hydraulic swim platform ourselves than paying a yard to install stabs or build a cockpit. It wouldn't be the first time having a go with Fusion360 and a metal glue gun. A smaller boat, from what we've read, gets better mileage especially if it's a single, but the reduced living area, storage and tankage of the smaller boat may not make up for the 50% better mileage. Fuel is the cheap part in the grand scheme, so it's of little concern. That said, we don't plan on running 200 off the pins all day long. We like going slow and mistakes tend to happen due to greater risks taken when in a hurry or on a schedule. One of the biggest killers in the general aviation field is the get-there-itis and I assume it's the same with cruising in a boat. Also, eight knots is about 10 SMPH and is about where these things burn 1 SMPG, so that makes trip planning and fuel burn calcs pretty easy. Yep, statute, not nautical. It's the unit of measure I've used my entire life and I'm able to quickly gauge and relate to, so sue me. lol... Finally, and at the absolute bottom of why we like the Hatts is that they look like proper, dignified motor yachts. I feel that the 53ED in particular is the pinnacle of flush deck evolution, or the 58CPMY if you need a cockpit, and said models are up there in the list of home runs Jack Hargrave has to his credit. But, appearance is subjective, so I'll respect any and all contradictory opinions.

We have looked at other boats. Well, looked at in the same way we've looked at the Hatts. We intend to look at basically anything that piques our interest in person. We may get on the flush decks and dislike how tall they are. We may get on a GB and dislike the trunk cabin. We may get on a sun deck and dislike the split level living arrangement. The point of the looking in person is to get a feel for the stuff beyond what little we've been able to glean from the internet. As I've said prior in this thread- Our search starts with what we have determined to the best of our abilities to be the best fit for our needs, but we are not married to any one boat brand or size.

No, we have zero -ZERO- intention of buying either of these boats we'll be looking at and have walked away from many, many purchases over the years. It is a machine and a tool, not a person, so there are absolutely no emotions involved other than our desire to hit the water. We're not a couple glassy-eyed 20 year olds in a hurry to be the next SV Delos.

I've read often the suggestion of going to a boat show. We're entirely open to it, but question the usefulness because we are not looking for a new boat, or anything even within 30 years of new, so how would looking at brand new boats help us out in looking at the relics from the past that we want? My wife said that the interiors on the new stuff look like prison cells what with the Ikea design language and relatively cold and monochromatic color pallet. Sharp corners have no place on a boat in our opinion for the reason stated by whomever mentioned that. Ouch!

I think it's incredibly disrespectful to view an item for sale and verbalize disgust or negativity. If you don't like it, don't buy it, plain and simple.

Mrs. Trombly- we don't rely on Mead or Powell for power or water. All that goes to AZ, NV, and CA. Maybe NM, too... While we aren't part of the Colorado River basin, we are close to what you could consider the head waters of the basin we're in, and our reservoirs are low. Some are completely dry, others are near full pool, but I believe the UT state average is somewhere around 25-30% capacity. The scientists say this is a 1200 year drought that's been going on for 20ish years with no end in sight. I've only been out here since '05 and there's been little to no mention of it or action to conserve until the last few years, but I've seen the snowpack dwindling every year since I've been here. They put meters on our secondary irrigation water in 2020, established a baseline from data collected during 2021, and just this year finally got around to putting restrictions on secondary irrigation water only. However, the only limitations are time of day and how much water per month is used, and they're putting grossly high caps on our monthly allocations. Our neighbors that I've spoken with have all said that even if they change nothing about their watering schedule, they still come out at the end of the month using roughly 50-60% of their allocation. Our city puts a flat fee of $90 on our taxes every year for the secondary hookup, and if I watered my 3000 square foot lawn for two hours every night of the week, I'd still be 32,000 gallons under my allotment at the end of the month so it's like, where's my motivation to do anything to conserve? They do have a fine schedule for infractions, but you have four overages before they cut you off for the year.�� Culinary is still a free for all and insanely cheap; we use around 10,000 gallons a month and pay $13 for it. There's also a ton of talk about xeriscape, but they expect home owners to foot the bill while all the municipal and state properties have thick, green grass that's sometimes irrigated during the day. Lead by example? Nahhh... our governor said to pray for rain, so that'll do the trick. �� Side note to reduced snowpacks- The Great Salt Lake is shrinking, which will reduce the lake effect snow we rely on to fill our reservoirs. On top of that, the receding waters expose a lake bed that has toxic metals and elements in it such as arsenic. Toss in our usual easterly summer winds, and all that dust is going to get blown over 2.3 million people in the Salt Lake valley. Sen. Romney is involved with actively restoring the lake, but I think it's too little too late. Nearly all the water that feeds the GSL is diverted for agriculture because growing alfalfa in the desert to export most of it overseas is a great use of resources. It also doesn't help that our current governor is an alfalfa farmer, so you know who he's prioritizing. Anyway...
Backing up a bit to what you said about twins and a thruster- all of my boating experience has been with singles with the exception of my friend's Bayliner that I willingly let myself get roped in to "captaining" during his booze cruises, and can't believe how nimble that thing is in comparison. My wife comes along a lot and all I had to do was tell her to center the helm and run the sticks like she would in a skid steer, and she had an easier time docking it than she does with our boat with a single. We couldn't imagine how much easier a thruster or thrusters would make it.

I think that's everything. Thanks again for all the advice; Great points, and we have a lot to think about. And if you managed to read my entire vomit dump of text and think we're making a mistake anywhere, please let me know.
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 08:50 PM   #30
Guru
 
AlanT's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: MoonShadow
Vessel Model: Wendon Skylounge 72'
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 606
"I've read often the suggestion of going to a boat show. We're entirely open to it, but question the usefulness because we are not looking for a new boat, or anything even within 30 years of new, so how would looking at brand new boats help us out in looking at the relics from the past that we want? My wife said that the interiors on the new stuff look like prison cells what with the Ikea design language and relatively cold and monochromatic color pallet."

The 'In the water boat shows' in the PNW and FL and Annapolis and Newport all feature used as well as new boats from my experience, although there are a LOT more used boats at PNW shows than the others mentioned.
~A
AlanT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 09:24 PM   #31
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanT View Post
Tons of good advice here so I wont add to the pile. I noticed you proposed asking "does everything work". I suggest you change that question a little. If you asked me that question my knee jerk reaction would be "yes".

However if you ask what is currently causing a problem or broken or soon needs replacing on the boat you will hopefully get a thoughtful and more useful response (you would from me!).

In your price range the problems that you will not be able to visually identify by a thorough walkthrough will be engines/drive train and structural integrity. You can smell problems with the heads, mold/damp. You can identify prior or current leaks from stains. You can judge what needs updating from cosmetics to instrumentation to electronics to galley. So do your work on the walk through (which should be a long walkthrough (or a return visit) on a shortlisted boat), then hire an engine and a general survey. Both are needed IMO.
You snuck this one in while I was writing another book.

I don't believe I proposed simply asking if everything works but if I did, I misspoke. That's a question I'd put down there with asking what the lowest they'd go on the price before a viewing date is even set. When I'm asked that my response is always, "What's the highest you'll go?" If I'm asking about any problems, it'll be about what I've discovered during my inspection, and that's mainly to gauge the honesty of the seller and the likelihood they've maintained it properly. "With an open checkbook" is trite and complete BS.

The initial walkthrough is what I'd consider a cursory inspection to see if it's worth a closer look. I'm not there to survey it, but I would be looking for anything that's glaringly out of line with ABYC and USCG standards. I have a pretty good understanding of what red flags to look for, but would never buy something this big without a hull and engine survey and sea trial performed by the best I can find. I'm also fairly certain that any insurance co is going to want those completed before they approve coverage, anyway.
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 09:30 PM   #32
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanT View Post
The 'In the water boat shows' in the PNW and FL and Annapolis and Newport all feature used as well as new boats from my experience, although there are a LOT more used boats at PNW shows than the others mentioned.
~A
How used is used, though? Our cap is $250k and we haven't seen anything remotely appealing in that price range newer than 25ish years old. I would think that the used stuff at boat shows wouldn't be that old and if it was within our budget, wouldn't be big enough to do what we want without incurring major compromises. That said, it would be nice to go see what the rich folk cruise around on.
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 09:41 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
Delta Riverat's Avatar
 
City: Stockton
Vessel Name: Dream Catcher
Vessel Model: 1979 Island Gypsy 44 Flush Aft Deck
Join Date: Feb 2022
Posts: 138
Hehe, yeah, mine was a hundred grand. Blew that budget too! Break Out Another Thou!

So we left the "buy dock" at about 110. 93 for the boat and the rest for repairs and slip rent.

Marine stuff -
Delta Riverat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 09:51 PM   #34
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
One more thing about line handling I forgot to mention- we want to avoid marinas as much as possible beyond fuel and pump out, so side deck access isn't as important to us as the livable area of the salon is.
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 10:18 PM   #35
Guru
 
AlanT's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: MoonShadow
Vessel Model: Wendon Skylounge 72'
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by LandlockedInUT View Post
How used is used, though? Our cap is $250k and we haven't seen anything remotely appealing in that price range newer than 25ish years old. I would think that the used stuff at boat shows wouldn't be that old and if it was within our budget, wouldn't be big enough to do what we want without incurring major compromises. That said, it would be nice to go see what the rich folk cruise around on.
I know that you are looking in Maine, and we just got home from MT Desert Island to home in the PNW without looking at any boats. However at the Seattle boat show there are boats from the '80's including even some wooden boats from the 70's there in the 3-400k range that probably have flexibility in pricing. Your ME experience may be different.
AlanT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 10:26 PM   #36
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
Our search will encompass everywhere east of the Panama Canal that is within US waters. While a transit from PNW to the east coast would be an amazing adventure, it's just not within the scope of our reality. We would very much like to at some point charter a trawler for a week or two and cruise those islands and fjords up north of the border.
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 10:42 PM   #37
Guru
 
AlanT's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: MoonShadow
Vessel Model: Wendon Skylounge 72'
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 606
Quote:
Originally Posted by LandlockedInUT View Post
You snuck this one in while I was writing another book.

I don't believe I proposed simply asking if everything works but if I did, I misspoke. That's a question I'd put down there with asking what the lowest they'd go on the price before a viewing date is even set. When I'm asked that my response is always, "What's the highest you'll go?" If I'm asking about any problems, it'll be about what I've discovered during my inspection, and that's mainly to gauge the honesty of the seller and the likelihood they've maintained it properly. "With an open checkbook" is trite and complete BS.

The initial walkthrough is what I'd consider a cursory inspection to see if it's worth a closer look. I'm not there to survey it, but I would be looking for anything that's glaringly out of line with ABYC and USCG standards. I have a pretty good understanding of what red flags to look for, but would never buy something this big without a hull and engine survey and sea trial performed by the best I can find. I'm also fairly certain that any insurance co is going to want those completed before they approve coverage, anyway.
I may have picked up that comment from a response to your messages, my apologies.

Everyone has a different style of negotiation and it is not likely that the owner will be present for a viewing. However if one is present and willing to chat that provides an opportunity, not for negotiation but for knowledge that may assist later in the purchase.

Personally I would not negotiate price with an owner in the presence of a broker AT ALL. That is the brokers job. Or if you do not have a buyers broker then it is your job with the broker not the seller. My point was more subtle. Try to find out what the owner feels are his weak points on the boat. 'if you were keeping the boat would you ......? What are you currently working on....? What yards have you used for repairs...? What repairs are they good at, did they do for you...? 'So IF you have that opportunity to walk through the short list boat, I would spend at least an hour on the entire interior of a 40' including all hatches/voids. If you chose to rely on the survey you would be surprised how many things a surveyor will miss that you will be able to find if you look.

Surveyors in general have to cover their bases. They spend an inordinate amount of time tapping deck and hull because these are very important, but they also spend a lot of time inspecting and reporting on inexpensive easy things to fix that are in ABYC. These are not unimportant, and they do need to be addressed but they are minor $$, and he or she is doing their job. But while that is going on you have the opportunity to dive into the boat.
The surveyor will likely not be at all focused on a number of things that you can likely spot right off with an observant eye and which can amount to big $$. No exhaustive list here but examples: Problems with damp under the mattresses; things that work, but make weird noises and give you no confidence; water where there shouldn't be (damp carpets, rust stains on fibreglass); Smells, especially in void spaces and near plumbing; dry sumps in windlasses, thrusters, autopilot reservoirs or leaks in same; dripping raw water pumps on gensets (surveyor didn't open the box) worn steering arms leaking fluid; Boats in the age that you are looking at will always have a number of failing or near to failing devices. A purchase is the only opportunity you have to share the cost of those future repairs with another. Take your time and you will be well rewarded.

A well regarded poster on this forum has on his byline something like this:
Everything on your boat is broken, you just don't know it yet.

It's worth considering. Once you close everything that fails is 100% your expense.

Good luck and don't undersell your own ability to inspect the boat independently from the surveyor.
~A
AlanT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 11:03 PM   #38
Guru
 
Spinner's Avatar
 
City: Langley, BC
Vessel Name: Spinner
Vessel Model: 2003 Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 520
Re side deck access - don’t dismiss this so quickly! If you are not going to be docked, you will be anchoring. Side deck access is important in going forward to anchor too! In addition, you will be docking at times (getting fuel, provisions, water, going to a pump-out).

And while I have you here, consider putting a cockpit and easy swimstep access on your list! Particularly if you are mostly at anchor, these two will make it easier to get in and out of your dinghy.

And lastly, give some thought to ease of deploying and stowing that dinghy. Yes, you will need one, and a kayak is fun but doesn’t really serve the same functions; it won’t be your SUV!
__________________
Regards

Sue
42 Nordic Tug Spinner
Spinner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2022, 11:40 PM   #39
Member
 
City: South Ogden
Join Date: Jan 2022
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spinner View Post
Re side deck access - donít dismiss this so quickly! If you are not going to be docked, you will be anchoring. Side deck access is important in going forward to anchor too! In addition, you will be docking at times (getting fuel, provisions, water, going to a pump-out).

And while I have you here, consider putting a cockpit and easy swimstep access on your list! Particularly if you are mostly at anchor, these two will make it easier to get in and out of your dinghy.

And lastly, give some thought to ease of deploying and stowing that dinghy. Yes, you will need one, and a kayak is fun but doesnít really serve the same functions; it wonít be your SUV!
Thanks for the advice and tips! I think that you might be picturing the wrong boat, and at the risk of insulting your intelligence, here's a few shots of the 53ED if they help.

Plenty of access to the foredeck from the pilot house for anchor handling and returning the one finger Florida salute.


Along the salon is still accessible if you don't mind an 8" foothold and hanging off a railing, but not something I'd consider functional or safe for docking.


Lastly for what it's worth, there is about 5' between the rear of the deck house and the aft railing.


Question about the cockpit- In lieu of a cockpit, would an enlarged swim platform with stairs going down across the transom be a suitable substitute in terms of accessing the water?
LandlockedInUT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2022, 12:07 AM   #40
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
City: Sydney
Vessel Name: Sojourn
Vessel Model: Integrity 386
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 12,357
Having had both, I prefer "walkaround" to "clingon" decks. A "sundeck" design adds difficulty to line handling/docking. Easy unhindered all round access isn`t always vital but one day it will be. As you apprehend, it intrudes negatively on interior space.
We`ve a spacious flybridge but my favourite spot to sit, dine,etc is the cockpit, adjacent to fridge, galley, radios,etc. It would take a lot of persuasion to not have one.
__________________
BruceK
2005 Integrity 386 "Sojourn"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012