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Old 10-20-2019, 04:44 PM   #141
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If it is still under warranty then it is the time to give it a WOT run for at least 5+ minutes, it it craps the bed under warranty is the time to find out. Good luck.
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Old 10-20-2019, 05:56 PM   #142
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On the advice of my VERY knowledgeable mechanic, who has been taking care of my misc. diesels for like 20 years, I run my FL 135 (32' GB) up to max throttle (2450 in my case) every few months for maybe 10 minutes. First, this should never damage the engine unless there is already something really wrong with it--in which case it's better to find out about it now. Secondly, I do this to slightly stress the engine systems under somewhat controlled conditions, rather than having a surprise problem many miles from home. Usually, the coolant temp rises a little bit, but not enough to set off the alarm. Once the temp did go up enough to set off the alarm, then came back down soon after I came back to cruiising rpm of 1800. Turned out the heat exchanger needed cleaning, no big deal. So yes, running the engine up to WOT once in a while is a just good maintenance procedure.
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:39 PM   #143
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On the advice of my VERY knowledgeable mechanic, who has been taking care of my misc. diesels for like 20 years, I run my FL 135 (32' GB) up to max throttle (2450 in my case) every few months for maybe 10 minutes. First, this should never damage the engine unless there is already something really wrong with it--in which case it's better to find out about it now. Secondly, I do this to slightly stress the engine systems under somewhat controlled conditions, rather than having a surprise problem many miles from home. Usually, the coolant temp rises a little bit, but not enough to set off the alarm. Once the temp did go up enough to set off the alarm, then came back down soon after I came back to cruiising rpm of 1800. Turned out the heat exchanger needed cleaning, no big deal. So yes, running the engine up to WOT once in a while is a just good maintenance procedure.
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I agree!
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:44 PM   #144
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Just ran our mains WOT for 4 minutes over the weekend, temps were good. 69GPH not so much.

The rooster tail and wake would have made for jet ski heaven!
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:33 PM   #145
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Oldersalt wrote;
“On the advice of my VERY knowledgeable mechanic, who has been taking care of my misc. diesels for like 20 years”

Mechanics are for replacing parts, troubleshooting, estimating repair costs and other mechanical doings.
When you want engineering information including performance limitations you need an engineer or a manufacturers representative that has close (preferably) working experience w engineers.
Mechanics are for bending wrenches but many are very experienced in their trade. Some have a great “gift of gab” that makes them appear to be much more knowledgeable than they are.
Be especially cautious if you hear a mechanic promote things that are spelled out clearly in the manual with different numbers or practices not spelled out in the manual.
If you can’t get the information you need from the manual contact the manufacturer. 9999% of the time you will get the correct and best information.
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:39 PM   #146
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My boat's maximum speed is achieved at 2200 RPM (normal cruise at 1800) while the engine (John Deere 4-cylinder, naturally aspirated, 80-horsepower) is capable of a wasteful fuel-consumption 2400.
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:51 PM   #147
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Oldersalt wrote;
“On the advice of my VERY knowledgeable mechanic, who has been taking care of my misc. diesels for like 20 years”

Mechanics are for replacing parts, troubleshooting, estimating repair costs and other mechanical doings.
When you want engineering information including performance limitations you need an engineer or a manufacturers representative that has close (preferably) working experience w engineers.
Mechanics are for bending wrenches but many are very experienced in their trade. Some have a great “gift of gab” that makes them appear to be much more knowledgeable than they are.
Be especially cautious if you hear a mechanic promote things that are spelled out clearly in the manual with different numbers or practices not spelled out in the manual.
If you can’t get the information you need from the manual contact the manufacturer. 9999% of the time you will get the correct and best information.
So are you advocating not listening to his mechanics advice? He has trusted him for 20 plus years... Do you listen to Hattons advice or are you thinking they are trying to sell you parts on the engine you purchased? Hatton mechanics trying to rip you off?
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:54 PM   #148
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I agree with doing a brief (a minute or 2 is plenty) WOT check every few months. Confirming that it comes up to the expected RPM and temperature doesn't climb excessively is a good check. If you see an issue on the WOT test, it's an indicator that something isn't right, even if it's not bad enough to show up otherwise yet.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:01 PM   #149
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Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
My boat's maximum speed is achieved at 2200 RPM (normal cruise at 1800) while the engine (John Deere 4-cylinder, naturally aspirated, 80-horsepower) is capable of a wasteful fuel-consumption 2400.
Why are you overpropped Mark?
Trying to save a bit of fuel?

Years ago I usta downshift when slowing down or coming to a stop.
I suggested that my mother do the same.
She thought about it and said; “what’s more expensive engines or brakes”?
As you can see .. mom was smart and I was a young kid.

In the overpropping issue I’d rather do what is best for my engine. The tiny bit of fuel one saves from overpropping is fly stuff compared to engines.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:08 PM   #150
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Actually the best way to slow down a car is to take your foot off the gas pedal a bit sooner and save both the engine and the brakes... And in our motorhome I use the exhaust brake absolutely as much as possible since I really don’t want to buy a brake job in it.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:11 PM   #151
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S of S wrote;
“ So are you advocating not listening to his mechanics advice? He has trusted him for 20 plus years... Do you listen to Hattons advice or are you thinking they are trying to sell you parts on the engine you purchased? Hatton mechanics trying to rip you off?”

Not so.
All input is good. And if not at least it may be interesting. Listening to one’s mechanic is a very good thing and we listen to them more often that anyone.
But we can’t know too much re our engines and any imput adds to our knowledge or potential knowledge.
Add it all up, shuffle twice and consider all information. It’ll all add up to someth’in and knowing what info or source is best is very important. If you’re going to wash dishes listen to your mom .. not your bud down the street.

Hey Jack,
I just picked up on something. Initially I thought you were referring to Hatterass boats and their engine techs.
But from somewhere you remember my engine came from Hatton’s engines in Ballard (Seattle Wash). I’m sure impressed w your memory. Actually my engine came from Yukon engines .. under the same roof. And Yukon usta be Klassen. Hatton bought out Klassen and all their inventory. Soon after they changed their name to Yukon. Have no idea why.
Klassen is alive and well in southern BC Canada as far as I know. But in the USA Klassen products are available through Hatton Marine Engines.
Hatton offers some engines too big for trawlers.
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:55 PM   #152
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Why are you overpropped Mark?
Trying to save a bit of fuel?.
The boat was designed/built that way. I've no complaints.
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Old 10-23-2019, 05:33 AM   #153
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Setting a boat up to increase the engine efficiency, lower the cruise RPM ., lower the noise and vibration on board and have the engine last longer is simply proper engineering.

Sure in theory it could be overproprd , asking the engine to handle a larger load than it was built for at a low rpm, tho it seldom is.

A 20% better fuel burn hardly matters to a boat burning 2-3 GPH , but operating the engine with good efficiency can extend the engine life as it operates with the load it was created to carry.

The hassle is props absorb way less power , even with slightly lower RPM , so an "overload" can be checked by simply advancing the throttle to see that 200-300 RPM more is available.

No question the surface skimming boats , like sport, fish that are usually run near wide open need to be sure the overload sign , black smoke , only is produced when accelerating , but for us displacement cruisers the HP required to cruise ia available at way lower RPM.

Its a totally different operating range for displacement cruisers, so the rules for pulling water skiers do not apply.

IF a cruiser had an engine closer to the HP required a WOT check would make sense , but with 30-40HP required and 120+ HP engines installed NOT seeing WOT RPM means some engineering and experience was used in the prop and tranny selection. A good thing.
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:16 AM   #154
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IF a cruiser had an engine closer to the HP required a WOT check would make sense , but with 30-40HP required and 120+ HP engines installed NOT seeing WOT RPM means some engineering and experience was used in the prop and tranny selection. A good thing.
Or this could indicate problems such as barnacles on your prop, dirty fuel, fouled bottom, etc. I run my boat briefly to WOT everytime I take her out as a diagnostic to ensure all is well. My prop and transmission are set so I can achieve 3600 RPM in gear per Volvo. I recently was down about 200 RPM from just a few barnacles on my prop. It doesn't take much!
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:22 AM   #155
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Most people never get their car or motorcycle to WOT
Not sure why you need to on your boat
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:14 AM   #156
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Why are you overpropped Mark?
Trying to save a bit of fuel?
If he can reach the rated 2400 RPM (even without a measurable increase in boat speed), I'd say he's not overpropped, he's just a little overpowered.
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:27 AM   #157
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Most people never get their car or motorcycle to WOT
Not sure why you need to on your boat
Was thinking along that basis the other day; boat - vs - road vehicle WOT tests.

I realized... you can't [most likely won't] run road vehicles at WOT for any period of time, unless you gear down and hold engine at WOT RPM.

Would be pretty silly spending 3 minutes or more rolling down the HWY at 60 mph in 2nd or 3rd gear with engine at WOT; just for the sake of being at WOT to test if engine could do it. Of course you could do WOT in top gear... usually at well over 100 mph.

Now; some road vehicles do reach pretty high rpm [basically WOT range] during upshifts... but... that high rpm is reached only for split second.

Where as boats are a different animal. Boat engines are geared differently, with different load factors and vastly differently top end speeds [well, most boats are anyway]. So... in a boat it's [usually] not to difficult to go WOT for a multi minute period of time; if desired. And, I do believe in using WOT for a limited time-span on boats for occasional mechanical/heat check ups as well as to be used when there is need to immediately alter a position regarding the water's surroundings. What I don't understand is doing WOT very often; just for the heck of it. Not saying that often using the limited time-span WOT technique is incorrect to do... just don't understand why to bother doing that???
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:19 AM   #158
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Professional Boatbuilder has a good write-up on the subject:
https://www.proboat.com/2010/09/wide-open-throttle/

Most boaters underwork their diesels as it is and are afraid of pushing their diesel to WOT, but it is a good diagnostic tool. If a diesel self-destructs while briefly at WOT than there was a major preexisting problem.
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:43 AM   #159
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And.... big deal?


If your engine works happily along at your normal operating rpm for thousands of hours and you do due diligence maintenance.... finding out there is a problem at WOT gives you what? It doesn't like WOT?


I have had an annoying head gasket compression leak into the coolant system for at least 2500 hrs and nearly 15000 miles. Why should I push a Lehman that some say hate WOT versus lower RPMs and chance a bigger problem than cruising along at 1600 RPM and living happily for anther 2000 hours?


I love technical versus reality discussions....


A lot of people make a lot of money discussing "a perfect situation"....some of us just go thru life operating in a less than perfect world and prove theory or "perfect world" is just that.
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:58 AM   #160
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The idea isn't to go WOT often or for very long. So you're not beating on it. The idea is to see if WOT now behaves differently than WOT a year ago. If it's the same, all is good. if it's 200 RPM less, smoky and has some extra vibration, well, something is wrong. Might be an engine issue or might be crud on the prop or prop damage, but either way, it's likely affecting things at cruise speed, just not as obviously. And depending on what it is, it may get worse.

Catching a problem while it's minor and can be fixed on your terms is always better than waiting until the problem says "ok, I'm here, fix me now!"
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