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Old 06-23-2020, 05:27 PM   #21
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As you can tell by the picture, this is a tippy canoe! Imagine what it’s like with another adult plus a motor! I’m in favor of a full F-N-R too Ski, but a couple of pounds is serious business with this rig. Unless you want me to tell Liz she needs to loose a few so I can have the reverse feature! Your call.Click image for larger version

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Old 06-23-2020, 06:32 PM   #22
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But it's a good thing some of you say the Honda isn't unbearably loud because it seems everyone locally is out of stock on both the Suzuki & Honda.
I ordered mine through onlineoutboards.com. Free shipping! Should be here tomorrow.
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:11 PM   #23
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For those concerned re the lack of a reverse gear, I would just say...first ask yourself, seriously, how often you would really need to use a reverse gear in a light weight dink. I my experience, hardly ever. Even leaving a beach we just used to spin the dink bow out, get other(s) going to hop in, then I'd give a shove, jump in, Honda running in idle, leg up, because being air-cooled, you can, then quickly lower the leg, twist the throttle and we're away.

Point worth noting, the one time I did find I really wanted reverse - big-time! - was when a large trailer yacht nearby was drifting free, because the motor died after they up-anchored, (large 2-stroke outboard), and wouldn't re-start. I could see they were getting into shallow water near shore, so I hopped in the dink, motored over, handed the worried wife the painter, which was of course attached to the bow, and as there was no time to move it to the stern for a tow, just spun the trusty Honda 2 around, and because all outboards are more effective when pointing in the normal forward direction, (they cavitate horribly under power in reverse) she pulled that heavy yacht out to safer deep water with the dink going backwards, but the motor in effect facing forwards, (flipped around), no trouble at all.
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Old 06-24-2020, 06:19 AM   #24
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I just bought a motor for a 9' dink, and went with a Yamaha 4hp. I've had excellent experience with Yamahas, so was inclined that way to begin with. But Suzukis are widely used around here, and my friend who owns the marina is a dealer for both, so I was open to Suzuki as well.


Having full F-N-R was mandatory, and that eliminated the 2.5hp models in both brands. The 4hp is the smallest with a full gear box.


From there, I wanted the lightest I could get. I leave the engine on the boat for the season, but pull the whole dink up on the dock when not in use. It's a tender to get back and forth between a dock and a boat on a mooring. Lighter makes it easier to haul and launch the tender since it's all done by hand. The Suzuki had a slight advantage over the Yamaha.


Then I went to the marina to see what they had, expecting to order something. The owner said that in the 4hp he prefers the Yamaha. Then checked stock and he had one and said come back in 2 hours. That afternoon I had a new motor.


His other recommendation was to use the canned non-ethanol fuel. In my application I will use very little, so that's what I'll try, though I've had very good luck using station pump fuel and immediately dosing it with Stabil.
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Old 06-24-2020, 07:54 AM   #25
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Try asking if the dealer can have what you want shipped from another dealership.


Small engines might be like parts and they get shuffled around when need be...so might not incur additional shipping.


As far as Ethanol....I have been dealing with it for well over a decade now....as an assistance tower...I came across many broken down boats with and without it's major issue...phase separation. Mainly in the beginning of it's introduction and very few the last few years.


Boats with large tanks and the possibility of water (not moiture) ingress....were very likely to have phase separation.


Boats with small portable tanks and small carbs and not fuel injected...were MUCH more likely to have varnish buildup and jet clogging if they didn't run their outboards out of fuel when not using them nearly every day (maybe week).


My personal experience has taught me that ethanol fuel is not as bad as the internet stories often told about it...but in some ways it is unforgiving...but easily managed in small engines.
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Old 06-24-2020, 08:35 AM   #26
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Chop the throttle, you'r in neutral. Give it a tiny bit of gas and you're moving. You'll learn to 'blip' the throttle for fine control. In fact, once you get the hang of it, I find there is MORE control than fumbling to bump a gear shift in and out.

The only trick is learning how to quickly spin the engine around in order to use reverse. I rarely did so. Instead, because the motor could be rotated 360 degrees, you can get the motor beyond completely sideways. Rather than hitting reverse, we would (at slow speeds) turn the motor so hard we could whip the dinghy around 180 degrees like yanking the E-brake and stop ourselves on a dime. It takes some practice, both for timing and to learn how slow to avoid getting someone's butt wet. Once you get it down, you'll never use reverse again.
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Old 06-24-2020, 09:04 AM   #27
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My little Honda has been flawless. Can run all day on a tank of fuel (1l) at just above idle. Can one hand it with ease. I carry a small MSR camping fuel bottle in case I need more fuel. Pretty much zero maintenance, change the engine oil (0.25l) and crankcase oil (50ml) in it once in awhile. Hang it on the wall of the shed in the winter. Pull it back out and start in the summer. Just like all small Honda motors.

The clutch is simple to use. If the clutch is engaging at a higher speed it is probably because it has a zillion hours on it and is worn. It is a maintenance item. I haven't changed my clutch with moderate use for 10 years.

If run at high speed, it is annoyingly loud.
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Old 06-24-2020, 09:42 AM   #28
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Yeah, I have the air cooled 2.3 Honda for a year now but few hours. It’s loud and vibrates quite a bit but serves our 8’10” Walker Bay just fine. Skinny on fuel and I like the easy lift-off. Bought it so the Admiral could pull it, but it does kick back some with choke and yanks the pull cord out of your hand. With just my 250 lbs in the dinghy. Half throttle and full throttle feel about the same.

If you didn’t mind the clatter of your old Briggs & Straton 2 1/2 HP lawn mower, you won’t mind the Honda, and remember that it’s as easy to steal as it is to use.
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Old 06-24-2020, 09:59 AM   #29
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I'm curious what thrust rating your engine has, how fast it goes, and what you're using for a bsttery?

Ted
The electric I am using is the ePropulsion Spirit. It has an integrated LFP battery, the whole thing weighs 42 lbs. The battery is easily removed (takes about 5 seconds), weighs 18 lbs, so the rest of it is 24 lbs. I usually leave the battery in place, removing it only to charge. I do remove the battery when I mount or unmount as it makes the two pieces very light and manageable.

They claim "3 hp equivalent" as has become custom in the electric field (but we know that a 1000W motor is no where near 3 hp - on the other hand I very much doubt the Honda gets that to the prop either). I have it on a Bullfrog 10', empty weight is claimed to be 220 lbs but that is optimistic I think. With another 400 lbs of passengers, it will run along at something like 4.4 knots at full throttle (which is "hull speed") for an hour. We usually knock back to half throttle (500 watts) and run at 3.7 knots or so, will do over two hours. It is not quite silent, making a low whirring sound. The throttle is twist grip, twist one way it goes forward, the other it goes in reverse - instantly - which takes a little getting used to. It will run absolutely dead slow, nice for maneuvering.

We recharge it from the inverter underway, or shore power at the dock. It can be done from the inverter on batteries as well, but it is a significant amount of power, 1200W so figure 100AH out of your house bank if going from flat to full, which takes about 6 hours. I will say that in our use - putting around the anchorage or running into the dock and back a couple of times a day - charging has been an absolute non issue. We do it every week or two when on board full time (it'll be down to 1/2 or a bit less by then) and is far less hassle than dealing with gasoline. No way it could replace a 15 hp on a planing dinghy, if that is what you need - but compared to a 2 or 3 hp gas, I'd go electric again in a heartbeat. Jump in the dinghy, twist the throttle and you're going without pulling, stink, noise, or mess and zero maintenance.
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Old 06-24-2020, 10:55 AM   #30
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We've had ours for five years now and agree with all the negative comments...our two stroke Mariner was a far more superior motor, but replacement parts were no longer available, so we bought the heavier and noisier Honda.
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Old 06-24-2020, 05:20 PM   #31
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Try asking if the dealer can have what you want shipped from another dealership.


Small engines might be like parts and they get shuffled around when need be...so might not incur additional shipping.
I've called all most of the dealerships within a 100 mile radius and nobody seems to have one (Suzuki). They all seem to think they can have one shipped in about a week. I screwed up by waiting until the last minute even though I knew better. I suppose it's going to be the Honda. They seem to be in stock.

It seems that ,with the Honda owners on here, the general consensus it that mostly they're decent motors, just a little loud at higher RPM's. That shouldn't be an issue with us. I suppose I'll head out tomorrow and pick one up. I'm sure we'll be happy with it.

One interesting thing a Honda dealer told me was that they were reliable motors and the centrifugal clutch was reliable as well, as long as they didn't get wet. Apparently they are sensitive to water but he didn't elaborate. He just said the powerhead had to come off to service the clutch. I'm not going to rule out me dropping the thing over the side at some point but knowing what he told be , I'll be extra cautious. In the old days, when a 2 stroke fell overboard in salt water, you would give it a good dousing with fresh water ,dry it off and you were on your way again!
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Old 06-29-2020, 12:38 PM   #32
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Honda centrifugal clutch

I owned a Honda 2.5 for a couple years, but got rid of it because I often fish from the dinghy, and the centrifugal clutch would go into neutral when trolling slow. It was also noisy.

I bought instead a Suzuki 2.5, with Forward/Neutral shift. Same weight as Honda and much quieter.

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Old 06-29-2020, 01:16 PM   #33
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Suzuki 2.5

I did extensive research last year and narrowed it down to the Honda and Suzuki most because of weight. I bought the Suzuki 2.5 over the Honda because it was quieter and has a N-F instead of just a centrifugal clutch.
Couldn't be happier. Started on the first pull this spring, even with last year's gas still in it. Wanted to buy local, but no one stocked it and the list price was much higher anyway. I would recommend this online outfit:

https://www.porta-bote.com/suzuki/

I was impressed - they had a real contact with a name, an email and a direct line instead of a boilerplate reply form. I paid $769.00, no tax and free shipping. Pretty sure I ordered on Monday and had it for the weekend.
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:23 PM   #34
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Surprised no one mentioned Torqeedo. After years of gasoline (and oil) outboards for the dink (yes, even starting with the devil itself, the Seagull!), we realized we were limited in most harbors and anchorages to "no wake," or about 3-5 mph. The Torqeedo easily pushed a 10' HBI Caribe for as long as we needed for as far as we ever were going, needed no re-build or winterizing every haul-out season, was very light and dismantleable, no storage issues for gasoline aboard (and spilling while filling) and had its own GPS installed in the control handle. It does not need a generator or shore power to charge, only an inverter which handles it easily while under (main) power and you have a fully charged battery when you get to where you're going. They also offer a very simple solar charger for the "greenies" in the group! What more could you ask for?
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Old 06-29-2020, 01:33 PM   #35
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Old 06-29-2020, 07:23 PM   #36
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Old 06-29-2020, 07:28 PM   #37
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I have a 5 h p on an 9 foot Hypalon, hard bottom dinghy. The motor runs great, just not enough power.
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Old 06-30-2020, 06:59 AM   #38
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I have the 3.5HP Merc, 1 year old. These small 4 stroke outboards are heavier than the 2 strokes they replaced and are notorious for having carb problems. If I had to do it again, I'd spend the money for an electric like the Torqueedo. Lighter, quieter, more reliable.
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Old 06-30-2020, 08:41 AM   #39
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For a typical smaller dink, you either need something about 2-3hp or about 8hp. 2-3hp will get you around at hull speed. If you want to plane out it's going to take at least 8, and that won't be enough if crew is heavy. A 4-5-6hp is pretty pointless. Won't plane unless light as heck. But you do get F-N-R!!!
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Old 06-30-2020, 08:57 AM   #40
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For a typical smaller dink, you either need something about 2-3hp or about 8hp. 2-3hp will get you around at hull speed. If you want to plane out it's going to take at least 8, and that won't be enough if crew is heavy. A 4-5-6hp is pretty pointless. Won't plane unless light as heck. But you do get F-N-R!!!

Big difference in motor weight when you go from 2-3 HP to 4-5 HP. That was the decision maker for me in how much I wanted to be lifting. Whether you need 8 HP or more to plane is totally dependent on the dink and the crew weight. With a small inflatable and only myself (180lb), I can plane with 3.5 HP. I still think that if all you need is a means of getting to shore and don't need to go fast, electric is the was to go. No starting problems, very light weight, quiet, and you get reverse.
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