Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-21-2017, 07:40 PM   #21
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,658
Wiping down a relatively new, rust free engine does the same without the harmful effects of washing it.
__________________
Advertisement

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 07:54 PM   #22
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Wiping down a relatively new, rust free engine does the same without the harmful effects of washing it.
you are so predictable Paul...
Sigh,
Bruce
__________________

Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 07:54 PM   #23
TF Site Team
 
Insequent's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Insequent
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 50 Mk I
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,291
I've only washed down my starboard engine once, after I managed to make a hash of a fuel filter change. So, lots of those fuel spill sponge sheets, some degreaser, wiping and finally a hose down.

Afterwards the 'water in fuel' alarm (sensor at filter) drove me nuts. From now on a wipe down will be the limit!
__________________
Brian
Insequent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:00 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
SeaMoose's Avatar
 
City: Anchor Pointe, Ohio
Vessel Name: Sea Moose
Vessel Model: 1976 34' D/C Taiwanese Trawler
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 288
A little dishwasher soap mixed in water makes an excellent degreaser, especially for diesel. Discovered this when I cut my 35 year old tanks out, making a ferocious mess...
SeaMoose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:07 PM   #25
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 13,355
Fortunately, I inherited two great 30 year old Perkins 4.236 engines. When I bought the boat, they already had the Perkins patina. Today, they are great 40 year old engines...with a little more patina.

I also clean up after oil changes and I know just about every drip of my engines. As a responsible Perkins owner/operator, I have drip pans and oil diapers to catch and indicate the current oil "flow" patterns.

Early on, I was told that if my Perkins stopped leaking oil then it means they're low on oil. I once removed a start solenoid bracket bolt from the case and oil emerged from the threaded hole. I knew at that moment that there was really no need to chase leaks. In my case, better to catch, observe and address the changes. It works for me, anyway.

Nice to have a modern, new boat, though! I love the everything about it except the price. Until I hit the lottery (which I don't play), I'll enjoy my "comfortably imperfect" trawler, but KUDOS to you for an impeccable ER! I love seeing boats like this and Codger's and so many others here on TF. It helps me keep the dream alive and be thankful for what I have!

Cheers!
__________________
My boat is my ark. It's my mobile treehouse and my floating fishing cabin. It's my retreat and my respite. Everyday I thank God I have a boat! -Al

@DeltaBridges - 25 Delta Bridges in 25 Days
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:20 PM   #26
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,563
Greetings,
Well, I'm a bit anal with machinery. A clean (and properly lubricated) piece of equipment is a joy to behold IMO. I admit to having degreased and hosed down the non electrical bits in our ER at least once in the past, primarily to remove built up grime but use of water to flush has been VERY limited since. Subsequent clean-ups have been accomplished with, as mentioned, WD-40 which I agree is a great general maintenance/cleaning item as opposed to a lubricant. I have the advantage of a small air compressor on board which is great for blowing oil seeps or excess WD to an area where it is more easily and readily wiped off. The ER gets a regular vacuuming as well.

__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:20 PM   #27
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
All of my engines are always clean and rust free in our boats and autos. I never paint engines either.

Bruce

So Bruce, since you have an engine that is painted Cummins White, will you touch up the paint as needed? I never really thought about it, but my boat came with a can of Cummins White spray paint that I have used on spots as needed.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:27 PM   #28
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
Fortunately, I inherited two great 30 year old Perkins 4.236 engines. When I bought the boat, they already had the Perkins patina. Today, they are great 40 year old engines...with a little more patina.

I also clean up after oil changes and I know just about every drip of my engines. As a responsible Perkins owner/operator, I have drip pans and oil diapers to catch and indicate the current oil "flow" patterns.

Early on, I was told that if my Perkins stopped leaking oil then it means they're low on oil. I once removed a start solenoid bracket bolt into the case and oil emerged from the threaded hole. I knew at that moment that there was really no need to chase leaks. In my case, better to catch, observe and address the changes. It works for me, anyway.

Nice to have a modern, new boat, though! I love the everything about it except the price. Until I hit the lottery (which I don't play), I'll enjoy my "comfortably imperfect" trawler, but KUDOS to you for an impeccable ER! I love seeing boats like this and Codger's and so many others here on TF. It helps me keep the dream alive and be thankful for what I have!

Cheers!
Some engines just leak! I've tangled with a few in my life...
Somewhere early in my career I learned to pick my battles but I like the challenge. I remember my first Corvair engine rebuild, done for a customer with some guidance from a friend who was the master of Corvair repair. This was an unusual vehicle for my shop as we specialized in European makes. It was an interesting enough job that I took it.
Those engines just poured oil from a number of places as delivered from the factory and this customer didn't believe we could stop the leaking. I serviced that car for years afterward and it didn't leak a drop after the rebuild. It can be done sometimes!
Thankfully, my boat diesel have all previously been of Japanese manufacture and these were pretty tight in terms of leakage. I expect the Cummins in our Tug to be every bit the modern design it is and not leak. If it does, I will see it immediately and fix it.
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 08:34 PM   #29
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,658
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
you are so predictable Paul...
Sigh,
Bruce
and why might tbat be?
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 09:05 PM   #30
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
So Bruce, since you have an engine that is painted Cummins White, will you touch up the paint as needed? I never really thought about it, but my boat came with a can of Cummins White spray paint that I have used on spots as needed.
Dave,
I am referring to the engines you see where people just let rip with a spray can and cover up the underlying mess of rust and neglect.
If I had need of repainting a part, of course I'd paint it.

I have learned that it is typically far easier to maintain something than it is to restore it. I wash and use my WD-40 not only to clean and then preserve but to rid the engine of any salt that has entered the engine room.
That salt is the reason you get rust and rust makes life more difficult later. I find that the time I spend cleaning my engine and engine room is easy time that I enjoy. I get my hands on every inch of everything that I can reach. I inspect, I see and if necessary I repair.
When I am done, I have an engine that looks better than new and that makes me happy.

In spite of some of the dire warnings of doom, my experience is exactly the opposite. When our saildrive input shaft seal began leaking at year 9 of the last boat, it was easy to see where the problem was and everything came apart like the engine was new. The repair was finished in no time. I am sure that most of the engines I have seen in similar year boats that have been treated to more typical oil and filter services would have been more difficult to deal with. Just because of the rust.

I am not suggesting that everyone go out and wash their engine right away either. Before hitting the Cummins with my soap and hose I first called Cummins and then communicated with Tony Athens just to be sure there were no "issues" with harnesses I needed to be aware of on the common rail QSB. Both gave a thumbs up.

The Northern Lights generator in Esmeralde has a new injection pump and injectors under warranty. The new parts are not painted and the original Awlgrip paint used chipped and left hundreds of tiny pieces behind when the parts were changed. When I spoke to the people at a Northern Lights about washing things to clean up the mess, they were concerned about certain parts getting wet. I was very careful to avoid those areas and still got everything cleaned up.
I may paint the new parts in or I may just leave them. As long as they are clean and free of rust (and working properly) I am happy...
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 10:24 PM   #31
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
I like having a clean engine and engine room, but can't bring myself to turn a hose on it. When I clean, it's more of a sponge bath.

I agree. There are way too many electrical connections and related equipment in my ER to turn a hose loose. Scary in fact.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-2017, 11:23 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Padeen's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: Mary A
Vessel Model: Chris-Craft Speedster
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 109
Quote:
If you want a clean engine, just wipe it down. These things are not furniture. More important that the machine is in good condition and less that it is spotless.
Padeen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 05:56 AM   #33
Guru
 
ranger42c's Avatar
 
City: Annapolis
Vessel Model: 58' Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5,509
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
Part of my long standing engine maintenance routine is to wash the engine and entire engine room after an oil change. I always clean up any spilled oil first.

Oil spill during oil change?

-Chris
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, USA
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 08:56 AM   #34
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
Oil spill during oil change?

-Chris
Inevitably!
Usually it is a side mounted oil filter that gets me. I use a baggie but it isn't a perfect solution...
Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 09:10 AM   #35
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
Inevitably!

Usually it is a side mounted oil filter that gets me. I use a baggie but it isn't a perfect solution...

Bruce


That is one thing that you will love, not having to change a horizontally mounted oil filter that is in a hard to reach, awkward position.

My sailboat has a 56hp diesel with relatively easy access for a sailboat. It is so much easier and faster to change the oil and filters on my 380hp Cummins!
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 10:07 AM   #36
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 18,114
Wash your dog or car but not your boat engine.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 10:59 AM   #37
Senior Member
 
Wataworld's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Name: Wataworld
Vessel Model: Defever 44+5
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 145
Engine cleanup

Bruce I commend your efforts and success in cleaning the exterior of your engine and room! But what about the interior do you fresh water wash the exhaust system? Do you use some kind of injector cleaner? ETC
Gregg
Wataworld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 11:31 AM   #38
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 11,250
Bruce - So SHINEY...

Had to put sunglasses on!!

Boats and girlfriends have similarities... i.e., we like to spend time shining both when new!

After that we just help em stay fairly clean... making sure both they and we can function well together - lol.
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2017, 11:50 AM   #39
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wataworld View Post
Bruce I commend your efforts and success in cleaning the exterior of your engine and room! But what about the interior do you fresh water wash the exhaust system? Do you use some kind of injector cleaner? ETC
Gregg
I am not an additive kind of guy typically. I did use a biocide on the sailboat. Not sure if I will on this boat or not.
I will perform the service suggested by Seaboard Marine on my aftercooler next as it makes perfect sense but while we are using the boat, no fresh water flush.
I certainly will flush if the boat is going to sit though.
Bruce
__________________

Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×