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Old 02-10-2020, 03:13 AM   #1
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Weichai chinesium (Badouin, Deutz, Cummins) experiences?

Hi! Next winter I'm going to have to repower, and I'm having a hard time finding engines that can be troubleshooted without a laptop and a guy that takes 500$/hour reading fault codes in white overalls. (yes it's a true story) Even worse, this guy would have to be helicoptered to ridiculous places at ridiculous costs most parts of the year...

I've been looking at Weichai 300+hp (wp10 or wp12) engines and their licence versions of badouin, Deutz and Cummins engines, and by the looks of some of them, they are made like they were 90's engines, without electrically controlled injection. I also find Youtube filled with videos of bolt by bolt assembly of these engines, that I hope I had with the current one.

Does anyone here have one of these chinesium engines installed and run it for a few thousand hours? I would be really interested in first hand experiences with these.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-10-2020, 03:57 AM   #2
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Greetings,
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Old 02-10-2020, 07:59 AM   #3
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The big hassle with old style (non electric injection) engines is most are illegal to fit in a even an older boat.

The world air police doesn't love them.Tier something is required.

Perhaps a good factory rebuild of the existing engine would work?
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Old 02-10-2020, 08:09 AM   #4
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I wouldn't be too scared of electronic engines. Just make sure you can find out what the necessary tools are for diagnostics, what they cost, etc. If you're mechanically handy and at least basic diagnostic tools aren't too expensive, it might make sense to get your own set. Otherwise, find what places can work on them and what their rates are. Some brands are better than others as far as service / diagnostics costs.
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Old 02-10-2020, 08:14 AM   #5
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I wouldn't be too scared of electronic engines. Just make sure you can find out what the necessary tools are for diagnostics, what they cost, etc. If you're mechanically handy and at least basic diagnostic tools aren't too expensive, it might make sense to get your own set. Otherwise, find what places can work on them and what their rates are. Some brands are better than others as far as service / diagnostics costs.
Well they are a lot more sensitive about fuel, and in the places we are, we are pretty exposed to shitty refuel facilities all the time. And the whole point was that the rates are ridiculously high here where the guy has to be flown in on short notice no matter the brand. (and if it's bust we obviously aren't going to move a few hundred miles) A bit more old fashioned engine like the perkins Sabre we can fix on our shipyard with a set of wrenches and that's what we want.
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Old 02-10-2020, 08:26 AM   #6
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The big hassle with old style (non electric injection) engines is most are illegal to fit in a even an older boat.

The world air police doesn't love them.Tier something is required.

Perhaps a good factory rebuild of the existing engine would work?
From what I've seen there's plenty of motors that qualify for Tier II that are just normal diesel engines with a start retard "thingy" in the injector pump to reduce emissions while not in operating temperature (like the perkins sabre range). And I see there's plenty of weichai that are approved for the european market.

This engine has been rebuilt once before and it's a bit underpowered so that doesn't really work out.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:34 AM   #7
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I have no experience with the Chinese engines you listed. You might have a look at Mitsubishi engines. They met clean air standards not too far back without electronics. But I have not kept up with their ability to be compliant with current US standards. I see you are in Norway, I don't know what your clean air standards and requirements are which will of course affect your decision.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:48 AM   #8
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Olliesailor welcome aboard.
Up where you live there's only one engine I would fit and that's a Scania, you can buy a second hand truck engine. Great long life engine, easy worked on and I've had 4 Scania trucks that topped over 900,000 miles with no major overhaul. If you can't get one in Norway look next door in Sweden and get it shipped over to you on a pallet.
I'll ask my old contact up there if he knows of one.
I wouldn't touch Volvo because they're simply not in the same class.
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Old 02-10-2020, 09:57 AM   #9
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Olliesailor welcome aboard.
Up where you live there's only one engine I would fit and that's a Scania, you can buy a second hand truck engine. Great long life engine, easy worked on and I've had 4 Scania trucks that topped over 900,000 miles with no major overhaul. If you can't get one in Norway look next door in Sweden and get it shipped over to you on a pallet.
I'll ask my old contact up there if he knows of one.
I wouldn't touch Volvo because they're simply not in the same class.
We've actually started looking for old Scania engines since they are the ones the old beards recommended... The only question is how the officials will see the replacement. The keel is laid before the resolutions but they might just say that this is a major refit and say we have to put in an engine that is approved by a classing society (or at least has a CE marking) and an emissions certificate etc etc...

Would be very interested in something from around post 2009 that possibly would comply with all this certification mayhem
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Old 02-10-2020, 10:21 AM   #10
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Yup, IR nailed it. Scania D19 would be my first choice too. Followed by Cat 3406. As you note, emissions finagling is the challenge.
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Old 02-10-2020, 01:37 PM   #11
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We installed about a dozen Baudouin engines over the past two years, but they were newer electronic units. Regardless of the fact that they aren’t the mechanical “old school” engine you are looking for, build quality and support here in the US were both pretty pathetic.
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Old 02-10-2020, 02:04 PM   #12
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Olliesailor.
Go for a tier 4 engine and that will do your job perfectly. Depending on your choice you have 6, 11 or 14 litre Scania engines to choose from, I'd go for naturally aspirated or very lightly turbo'd and if you service it correctly it'll be there for the life of the boat. ONLY use Scania turbo filters others don't have the same filtration standards.
Frankly I've seen many newly commissioned boats and if the engines are freshly painted and well installed they only get a cursory glance because despite what they may brag about or say, many inspectors are 'paper jockeys' and barely know an oil filter from a fuel filter.
I've been on so many boat surveys and to quote the old army maxim.
Bullshit baffles brains.
Having said all that, install your fuel take off from the very bottom of the tank sump with a 'T' piece, if you refill, moor it overnight close by ,get a glass and take a sample from your 'T' piece to check for any crud or water before starting the engine.
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