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Old 03-28-2017, 08:25 AM   #141
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Mr. See. As has been mentioned, lockages are usually pretty straightforward. As to calling an "on demand" lock beforehand, it seems the lock tenders really don't care, for the most part, if you'll be there in 15 minutes or whenever only if you're there now. I expect for locks that operate on a timed schedule, it may be of benefit to call ahead. The norm is that commercial traffic gets precedence so you might have to wait. Some lock stations allow you to tie up to "something" if the wait will be prolonged. Others require that you basically drift around (hold station) until your turn comes up.

Different canal systems DO have different protocols but once at or through the first lock you'll know what the drill is for the rest of the system. Lock tenders are quite informative and they're probably asked the same questions dozens of times a week so don't be afraid to ask.

A while back I tried to figure out how many times the Admiral and I have negotiated locks in the last 30+ years. Best I could figure was 1000+.
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Old 03-28-2017, 09:23 AM   #142
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BandB,

I'd agree, it would make sense to time the locks, I thought in "entering" the canal we were talking about something else.

Now, question for you.... When you "enter" the canal, do you call the first lock and give them an ETA. How far out would you do that. Also, is there a best time of the year to do the canal or a bad time? I assume from what I hear there are a lot of locks along the canal.
Depending on your route there are as few as 29 locks and as many as 57. As to time of year, there's a challenge. From a navigation stand point the best time is later than it is from a looping standpoint This year the locks aren't opening until mid May. Since the season is short, I'd try to be there within a day or two of opening. Last year, they opened on May 1 and we started up the Hudson on May 2. Early though you may encounter more debris. I would say as early as possible but no later than May 31 so you'll not be rushed through the loop.

Here is the NY Canal site.

New York State Canals

Because you're going slow and not dealing with shipping traffic, you don't have to speak to the lockmaster as early as you might do on the TN River. Just a courtesy as you get close. Also, some sets of locks are flights, like E2-E6 where you lock five time in the course of 2 miles, so obviously they see that once you approach E2, you're going on through them all. The Erie Canal locks are all on demand, so any delays are minimal. By contrast, if you were on the TN River, with a lot of commercial vessels, you could wait 15 minutes or could wait 3 hours, so you contact well ahead to at least get in the queue.
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Old 04-01-2017, 06:02 AM   #143
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knuckle busting repairs
Depends on the boat. I just changed the impellers on my Defever 44. Took less than 10 minutes for the engine with the pump on the outboard side.
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Old 04-01-2017, 06:11 AM   #144
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As a pilot, I learned to live by and love redundancy after many years operating single engine airplanes. Both have their place, but given the chance, a twin is my choice.

In fact, I enjoy redundancy in significant capabilities on my boat that make a difference to me besides propulsion. Lighting, heat, ventilation, coffee-making, refrigeration, entertainment, Wifi, and navigation to name a few that immediately come to mind. For others, I try to carry a spare part that may make a difference someday.

Knowing this crowd, I'm betting there are many boats here that can say the same. Gotta love redundancy...
When we first owned our present boat, a Defever 44, at the end of a run late in the day with winds over 20 MPH, an injector line cracked. The second engine saved the day. Without it we would have likely ended up on the rocks. Before that incident I was ambivalent on twins vs singles. Not after that experience. Yes, double the maintenance. I care not.
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Old 04-01-2017, 06:54 AM   #145
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When we first owned our present boat, a Defever 44, at the end of a run late in the day with winds over 20 MPH, an injector line cracked. The second engine saved the day. Without it we would have likely ended up on the rocks. Before that incident I was ambivalent on twins vs singles. Not after that experience. Yes, double the maintenance. I care not.
Reality - for certain! Well put...

Even a single boat with the best stern and bow thrusters could not handle that situation which the "spare" twin engine easily accomplished. Congrats for avoiding disaster. I feel that for safety sake of product and lives redundancy of primary units is name of the game on boats.
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Old 04-01-2017, 08:50 AM   #146
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Catjack,
Your anchor should have kept you off the rocks.
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Old 04-01-2017, 09:06 AM   #147
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Catjack,
Your anchor should have kept you off the rocks.
Eric

What if you're too close to the rocks to deploy enough scope? Or, anchor simply does not set immediately? Or, you're in a rock lined jetty inlet with strong current as well as high wind, not to mention other boats doing their best to pass through? Or... or, or??

There is no doubt... the remaining "already up and running" engine of a pair of twins can/will enable safety maneuvers that a single screw simply can't; thrusters, spare get home power... or not. Also, twins make docking a breeze!

This means nothing against single engine boats... just that the redundancy of running twins in hairy, engine breakdown circumstances can easily save the day.
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Old 04-01-2017, 09:28 AM   #148
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Greetings,
Mr. nw. "...Your anchor should have kept you off the rocks. " You, of all people, should know Mr. cj. has the wrong anchor!

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Old 04-01-2017, 09:29 AM   #149
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I have had 2 injector line develop leaks, one pin hole, one a bend Crack. First leak proceeded 2 hrs to port, second, one hr to port.

I have a single Lehman.

Both repaired in an hr with on board spares.

First was on ICW, pouring rain, tornado watch.

Sure I have had a single quit in not so bad spots 3 times in nearly 15,000 trawler miles and probably a couple in 5000 hrs in an assistance tow boat....let alone countless other singles.

Part of driving one is to avoid critical situations or keep it going till clear.
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Old 04-01-2017, 10:02 AM   #150
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I have twins in my KK42, one of them is in parts though

Seems to be the difference, with a single maintenance and observation for proactive repairs is paramount. Seems with twins, not so much. Being in the mechanical field for over 20 years, failures always give warnings if you know what to look for.

Of course at this point in my trip, staring at over 700nm of open water between Cartagena and Puerto Rico with only a single (plus parts) I have to get on Richard Bost's (dauntless) wagon and hope for the best.
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Old 04-01-2017, 10:16 AM   #151
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Art and RT,
Obviously I meant most of the time one's anchor will keep the boat from drifting into danger.
Of course it's not bullet proof. In Alaska it's especially true. But on the east coast a long rode stands a good chance of saving the day. Very good chance.
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Old 04-02-2017, 05:11 AM   #152
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failures always give warnings if you know what to look for.
Always? Really? How would one be warned by a steel injector line cracking in a location that cannot be seen? "Always" is always a dangerous word of assumption.
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Old 04-02-2017, 05:17 AM   #153
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Art and RT,
Obviously I meant most of the time one's anchor will keep the boat from drifting into danger.
Of course it's not bullet proof. In Alaska it's especially true. But on the east coast a long rode stands a good chance of saving the day. Very good chance.
My first reaction was indeed to try to anchor. It would not set. Just scraped along a very hard bottom. Was getting dangerously close to shore. In the waning light I spied an unlighted face dock about a mile off. We made for that dock and finished tying off in the dark. So, yes, I was quite happy to have had twins that night. On days that nothing goes wrong, singles do just fine.
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Old 04-02-2017, 06:21 AM   #154
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All my fuel leaks gave notice by smell and collection of fuel in the drip pans.

The misting pin hole leak started and not detected for several days. So that engine happily ran 20 or more hours till I even found the leak, then because the misting was dangerout, I wrapped it so it was merely a drip and drove another couple hours to a marina.

On a gas boat it would have been nerve-wracking to run with a fuel leak, but I would run it long enough to get away from a dangerous lee shore or through a bridge with a following current.

More than fuel leaks, sudden shutdowns are more of a concern to me.

Fortunately out of millions of single engine boats through the years, very few totally lose an engine at a critical time....and most that do, still never wind up on the rocks.

I towed plenty of twin engine boats for all kinds of reasons...

If I cruised in more remote parts of the county, I would probably select a twin boat too. But I think it would be more for convenience than fear.
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Old 04-02-2017, 06:24 AM   #155
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The AICW no wake zones are easy compared to the Erie Canal. 4.3 knots is impossible with two engines in gear. However, as soon as we escaped the canals, speed was nice to have.


We did the Erie Canal last year. Never heard of a 4.3 speed limit.
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Old 04-02-2017, 06:31 AM   #156
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As I shop for a boat, some of the Grand Banks models have single, and some have dual engines.

I've never owned or operated a twin engine boat - my initial impression it is just twice the maintenance, upkeep and cost. But, mebbe redundancy is good.

What are the pros and cons of twin engines? Would you recommend twins, and why?

Thanks.


With twins upon entering a marina you center your rudders and control the boat entirely by working the shifters.
Very easy with practice.
When you come to an up wind dock you just get your bow near the dock, throw a bow line and "Twin Screw" the boat sideways to get the stern up to the dock.
You would love it.
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Old 04-02-2017, 07:41 AM   #157
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To me twins are great for the speedboat that has enough fuel to get where he wants to go , at speed.

The hassle I see , esp for the inshore displacement cruiser is prop damage.

Trash abounds in the waterway , and an accidental grounding does happen, and the Maineiacs do string their lobster pots from channel buoy to buoy..

A centerline single screw reduces the dangers.

In many boats the room to maintain the engine is far superior for the single.
Thank you! We are looking at trawlers, and our home waters are shallow with shoals that creep around. My neighbor mentioned that singles have more protected running gear which in our case is a big plus.
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Old 04-02-2017, 07:44 AM   #158
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We did the Erie Canal last year. Never heard of a 4.3 speed limit.
My understanding is that there are several short stretches where the speed limit is posted at 5 m.p.h. (4.3 knots).

The eastern part of the great loop is on my bucket list!

Jim
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Old 04-02-2017, 08:04 AM   #159
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For any newbie [or oldbie for that matter] regarding gasoline powered boats. Here are my important recommendations.

1. Fully Understand the heat/flash ignition [i.e. extremely explosive] volatility conditions of gasoline vapors... confined "vapors" in ample volume create a sudden, big, powerful, explosive bomb if flash temperature is reached. This can kill/maim and will total your boat as well as other boats if the fire reaches them.

2. Make sure that redundant capabilities for ongoing air change is in action for any confined areas where gasoline is stored and where gas engines exist. E.g. bilge blower[s], hull/deck vents, open hatches...

3. Do not start-up anything in an enclosed gasoline area without first actually smelling with your nose [i.e. lift hatch and bend down to take a long whiff]. Then turn on bilge blower for ten minutes before starting engine. Those two moves are life savers and the best minutes you can spend to make sure things are starting off correctly. If you smell gasoline fumes - immediately use safe methods of moving the air through and out of the compartment while you begin to assess what/why/where are the fumes coming from. Then take actions as necessary to correct the situation creating gasoline fumes.

4. Often [like a minimum of at least once every time aboard] follow a good regime/schedule for consistently getting [close and personal with all items] into the engine compartment and checking all areas, tanks, fittings, hoses, carbs/injectors, bilge floor, fuel filters etc. If you see or smell anything out of the ordinary then repair immediately or get someone who will soon repair. Do not start engines until all gasoline related items are in good condition.

5. Never, Never Run any gasoline engine aboard boat and go to sleep. You may not wake up if the exhaust comes enough into where you are sleeping. Carbon monoxide is order less and can easily kill a sleeping person.

Those five basic agenda for being safe with gasoline powered boats are simple to accomplish once you get them locked into your brain mechanics of what to do aboard boat.

Overall gas engines are ezy-pezy, inexpensive power sources. Good condition gasoline engines in a boat are simple animals that offer low maintenance costs, are easy to work on, and run quite/smooth with little to no odor.

Happy Boat-Power Daze! - Art
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Old 04-02-2017, 08:13 AM   #160
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Thank you! We are looking at trawlers, and our home waters are shallow with shoals that creep around. My neighbor mentioned that singles have more protected running gear which in our case is a big plus.
There is no doubt - full keel, single screw boat with full skeg to rudder and even a custom grating fashioned/installed to protect around prop is darn safe for not getting prop damage.
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