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Old 10-18-2019, 06:01 AM   #141
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.I sure wish our boat had a single in it!""


A single that has a dry stack and keel cooling would cut the parts count and maint items even more.
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Old 10-18-2019, 07:57 AM   #142
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Well, yesterday's generators work well also, at least on our boat which came with two. One is a Perkins-powered Kohler 12.5kw with 2,534 hours on the clock. The other is a 7.7kw Westerbeke with 3,700+ hours. Both are used regularly and work. How long they will continue to do so, who knows?
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and with the reliability of today’s heavy duty gennies, perhaps even just one of those also
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Old 10-18-2019, 08:05 AM   #143
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My old school gas Onan runs just fine too, just under 1400 hours on it. It can be a little bit fiddly at times (likes to have the carb adjustments played with periodically), but it's also about as complicated as a sledgehammer, so it would take a pretty significant failure to reach the point where I couldn't get it to run.
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Old 10-18-2019, 08:22 AM   #144
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Gasoline 1977 Kohler 7.5. Hours unknown. Reliability good. Fan belt here, governor spring there, impeller every so often... general maintenance stuff. Keeps great oil pressure and runs strong! Turns out plenty of juice.

Ignition set up can be on load applied auto start, if desired. Being as it is gasoline I do not leave it on that feature setting. I like to be hands on available at all times with this genny. I feel bilge blower needs to run for a while before each start of gen or of the twin engines. Haven't had a problem with unexpected fumes in 12 years... I'm always real friendly with all portions of engine compartment [especially all items that have to do with gasoline]... cause ya just never know!!
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Old 10-18-2019, 08:31 AM   #145
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Gasoline 1977 Kohler 7.5. Hours unknown. Reliability good. Fan belt here, governor spring there, impeller every so often... general maintenance stuff. Keeps great oil pressure and runs strong! Turns out plenty of juice.

Ignition set up can be on load applied auto start, if desired. Being as it is gasoline I do not leave it on that feature setting. I like to be hands on available at all times with this genny. I feel bilge blower needs to run for a while before each start of gen or of the twin engines. Haven't had a problem with unexpected fumes in 12 years... I'm always real friendly with all portions of engine compartment [especially all items that have to do with gasoline]... cause ya just never know!!
Agreed on the no auto-start for gas generators. Bilge always gets an in-person sniff during the engine checks before first start of the day (and that's before the blowers are on so any minor fumes will be noticed). Same thing after fueling. And the fume detector gets turned on before startup and stays on while anything is running. I also keep the detector on any time we're away from the dock, even if anchored with everything shut down, that way if I have to start an engine quickly, I've got some confidence that I can pop the hatch, give a sniff, hit the blowers and crank it without anything going boom.

It's funny you mention impellers. I've never had one fail before the 7 year mark on this generator, although we did start changing them a bit sooner than that to avoid failures.

And that reminds me, I've gotta work on a modification to my bilge blower setup for this winter. I want to have some ventilation running in the engine room whenever the generator is running (for cooling and safety), but I hate running the full compliment of bilge blowers the whole time the generator is running, as the Jabsco flange mount blowers I've got are pretty loud (inside and outside). Currently, I tend to shut the blowers off once it's been running for a few minutes if there are other boats nearby, as the blowers are far louder than the generator itself from outside. But unlike the engines, the generator doesn't move a whole lot of air through on its own, so it's not ideal.
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Old 10-18-2019, 08:52 AM   #146
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Agreed on the no auto-start for gas generators. Bilge always gets an in-person sniff during the engine checks before first start of the day (and that's before the blowers are on so any minor fumes will be noticed). Same thing after fueling. And the fume detector gets turned on before startup and stays on while anything is running. I also keep the detector on any time we're away from the dock, even if anchored with everything shut down, that way if I have to start an engine quickly, I've got some confidence that I can pop the hatch, give a sniff, hit the blowers and crank it without anything going boom.

It's funny you mention impellers. I've never had one fail before the 7 year mark on this generator, although we did start changing them a bit sooner than that to avoid failures.

And that reminds me, I've gotta work on a modification to my bilge blower setup for this winter. I want to have some ventilation running in the engine room whenever the generator is running (for cooling and safety), but I hate running the full compliment of bilge blowers the whole time the generator is running, as the Jabsco flange mount blowers I've got are pretty loud (inside and outside). Currently, I tend to shut the blowers off once it's been running for a few minutes if there are other boats nearby, as the blowers are far louder than the generator itself from outside. But unlike the engines, the generator doesn't move a whole lot of air through on its own, so it's not ideal.
We went 8 years once before impeller change. Didn't really seem needed - but why not! Often have engine hatches open for sniff test and other items. Bilge blower time before any engine start is 10 min minimum and left on for another ten after start. Luckily our tolly has blower exhaust vent close to 1/2 high slider door just aback of galley sink. So... I can slide that open while blower is on and lean out to get first hand sniff test of ER air. I sniff at blower start time and just before shutting blower down.
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Old 10-18-2019, 09:53 AM   #147
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.I sure wish our boat had a single in it!""


A single that has a dry stack and keel cooling would cut the parts count and maint items even more.
That sounds like something a Nordhavn could provide - a dream boat for sure but out of league for our budget.

And 7yrs between impeller swap outs...I don't have the stomach for that.
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Old 10-22-2019, 05:46 PM   #148
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Somebody needs to tell Richard on Dauntless that he is doing it all wrong!.... He needs to back track across the panama canal, Atlantic twice and get a twin screw boat so he will be safe and covered..
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Old 10-22-2019, 08:28 PM   #149
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we have a single with a bow thruster and do mostly coastal cruising. On odd occasions I'll run offshore about 50-75 miles. Never had a problem but i do have unlimited towing. (never had to use it)
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Old 10-22-2019, 10:28 PM   #150
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Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
My old school gas Onan runs just fine too, just under 1400 hours on it. It can be a little bit fiddly at times (likes to have the carb adjustments played with periodically), but it's also about as complicated as a sledgehammer, so it would take a pretty significant failure to reach the point where I couldn't get it to run.
I have a gas Onan in my motor home.
It has priming problems.
Why do you call yours “old school”?
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:30 AM   #151
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I have a gas Onan in my motor home.
It has priming problems.
Why do you call yours “old school”?
Mine is old school because it's an MCCK. It's built in the 80s, but the engine design on it dates to about the 1940s with very little change except a newer carb design and electric fuel pump. It's a flathead with points ignition. It's got its quirks. It usually takes a few cranks to prime the carb and start if it's been sitting for more than a couple of days. And it seems like the fuel mixture adjustments don't hold perfectly on the carb, as they periodically need to be tweaked to keep it from surging and misbehaving.

But when it's running well, it's a great unit. Barely a hiccup when you kick on a 16k BTU A/C unit.
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:45 AM   #152
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Our 1977 Tolly's orig Kohler 7.5 is a beast! Runs well and powers all we want.

Seldom does she need anything. No idea of the hours on her. Never uses a drop of oil. Has capability to be set up with switches as an instant start for when an "on" breaker suddenly experiences a load [fridge, 120V need or AC]. For several reasons I never leave switches setup in that pattern. I always do a hands on start or stop sequence and never leave the boat with genset running
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Old 10-23-2019, 05:45 PM   #153
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Also just how often really end up using the twin in a back up situation ? I’ve been told if one goes down the other is likely because it’s usually fuel issues that cause a diesel to stop .
Not often.

Have separate fuel supply if twin engine.

Twins are nice for maneuverability, except less so without counter rotation - smaller boats with V-drives usually.

But, my particular point: A twin engine boat with one down is out of practical service until fixed and the odds of that are twice as high, as is the cost of maintenance.
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Old 10-23-2019, 05:53 PM   #154
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Not often.

Have separate fuel supply if twin engine.

Twins are nice for maneuverability, except less so without counter rotation - smaller boats with V-drives usually.

But, my particular point: A twin engine boat with one down is out of practical service until fixed and the odds of that are twice as high, as is the cost of maintenance.
I wish you would have told me that before I used my boat on port engine alone for approx 32 hours. I could have stayed home instead.
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:50 PM   #155
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Not often.

Have separate fuel supply if twin engine.

Twins are nice for maneuverability, except less so without counter rotation - smaller boats with V-drives usually.

But, my particular point: A twin engine boat with one down is out of practical service until fixed and the odds of that are twice as high, as is the cost of maintenance.
The odds of engine failure can easily and simply be reduced to zero, just by having no engine(s) at all.
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:51 PM   #156
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Let's keep this going.

With today's most popular and trendy motor vessels being outboard powered, the twins Vs single argument for very old boats seems a bit dated. Kinda like Ford Vs Chevy, yesterday's news.

Nordhavn you say? Humm, all of those have a spare engine too. Point to Dauntless as proof of something. OK, I'll do that. Her journeys are less about the the boat and more about the owner. Few of us are as extraordinary and driven as Richard.

The best cruising passage makers remain, ta da, sailboats. Proof positive, of what I'm not sure. Just like single Vs twins arguments, proof positive of ongoing
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:39 PM   #157
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Originally Posted by EngNate View Post
Not often.

Have separate fuel supply if twin engine.

Twins are nice for maneuverability, except less so without counter rotation - smaller boats with V-drives usually.

But, my particular point: A twin engine boat with one down is out of practical service until fixed and the odds of that are twice as high, as is the cost of maintenance.
EN - This thread, and especially seeing your 31' Uniflite in Avatar, make me want to reveal the following:

Bout a decade ago... My son and I had been cruising in SF Bay for the day. During the last jaunt from Golden Gate Bridge I'd been cruising on plane; 18 knots with bow slightly raised. All went well till we came into the 5 mph canal leading toward marina where I docked the boat. Took a couple minutes puddling along on idle before starboard engine quit. I tried to start it with no luck. Then the port engine quit. Luckily it was calm day with little current. We dropped anchor. Motor sailer with a boating class soon came along and side tied us for the last 3/4 mile. Skilled skipper plopped us straight into the slip and would not take a dime! 1973, 31' Uniflite had one big gas tank that fed both engines. While bow was raised a bit... enough fuel to feed both engines had then been to tank's rear. When I'd throttled back to idle, and bow dropped down - well it's obvious what happened. Yup!!! I felt pretty dumb!!!

Anyway, it may interest you to see a double to your boat! Uni's are really nice boats to play with... if we keep enough fuel aboard!! LOL
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:44 PM   #158
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Wow, how did we get pulled into another "single vs twins" debate???
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Old 10-23-2019, 08:33 PM   #159
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Not often.

Have separate fuel supply if twin engine.

Twins are nice for maneuverability, except less so without counter rotation - smaller boats with V-drives usually.

But, my particular point: A twin engine boat with one down is out of practical service until fixed and the odds of that are twice as high, as is the cost of maintenance.
This is just WRONG.

I have seen twin outboards that were not counter rotation, but they are rare. Inboards, including v drives, are always counter rotating. Besides, who of us are in small twin outboards?

Twin with one down is just as usable as any boat with just a single, as that is exactly what you have.
If you have twins with a total hp the same as the single your identical boat mate has, the cost of maintenance is going to be very close.

Most engine failures are not fuel related any more. That may have been the case in the days before EPA rules forced clean fuel upon us. Nowadays, you can alter your fuel filter change schedule to "when necessary" instead of annually or more frequently than that. I know this. My last filter change, according to my log, was 12 years for secondaries, 4 years for primaries. Even then, only one of the 4 I changed really needed changing.
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Old 10-24-2019, 12:32 AM   #160
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Let's keep this going.

With today's most popular and trendy motor vessels being outboard powered, the twins Vs single argument for very old boats seems a bit dated. Kinda like Ford Vs Chevy, yesterday's news.

Nordhavn you say? Humm, all of those have a spare engine too. Point to Dauntless as proof of something. OK, I'll do that. Her journeys are less about the the boat and more about the owner. Few of us are as extraordinary and driven as Richard.

The best cruising passage makers remain, ta da, sailboats. Proof positive, of what I'm not sure. Just like single Vs twins arguments, proof positive of ongoing
No kidding Chev trampled Ford back in the 70's.
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