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Old 01-29-2020, 11:29 AM   #21
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Hi Weeb,

Dual function single lever are my preference as well. I have two Kobelt 2046 (have to check to be sure on the number) single lever dual action controls. Bought them used for a project two boats ago but sold it before doing the conversion. At the time Vetus offered a "transmission" the cables went into to make shifting and throttle easier. Don't know if they still do. Also have the cable connectors.

I wil post pictures later if you are interested. Seem to work well. The chrome is a little worn on the arc shaped covers. Thinking of $275.00 plus shipping for the two if you or anyone else is interested.

Rob
Hi Rob. I might be interested. PM me at mvweebles at Gmail dot Com.
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Old 01-29-2020, 11:34 AM   #22
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Will do. It will be later this afternoon.

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Old 01-29-2020, 12:18 PM   #23
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I much prefer single lever controls for simplicity of operation. I don't agree with the "risk" of overshooting neutral. Or the "risk" of not spending enough time in neutral while shifting. Learn your boat and its controls. My preference comes from experience with with both styles in singles, twins and triples. My current boat is dual lever on twins and I do just fine. Not gonna go with the expense of changing out to single lever. But, if I were setting up a new boat to fit my preference? It would be single lever.

I've also got experience with old skool telegraph, where you waggle the lever and the person in the engine room controls things. I guess that too is a kind of single lever.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:26 PM   #24
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I had dual levers and now single electronic. I think they are both fine. Single seems a bit simpler, but as evidenced by posting either is just fine. I have not had issues, the detents are solid and when in neutral the red lights are illuminated.
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Old 01-29-2020, 02:23 PM   #25
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With single lever control, it's too easy to shift past neutral or not stay in neutral long enough for the transmission to slow down. Some marine transmission require shifting at lower RPM.

With a double, there is a delay long enough for the tranny to slow when moving hand from throttle to gear lever.
The reality is much different than the perceived risk.Is it possible? sure. I have seen peeps grab the wrong handle on dual setup, way more than go too far on a single lever, dual function control...
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Old 01-29-2020, 03:50 PM   #26
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We went from separate gear/throttle controls to a combined Glendinning system (we have 3 stations).

I'll never go back to cables- I prefer the electronic controls. There is a delay when shifting from neutral to forward/reverse, but the delay is programmable and one quickly gets used to it.

Best of all, Glendinning completely supports their product line- when I needed a cable for my older system, they "dusted off the old machine in the back" and made my cable to order.
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Old 01-29-2020, 03:51 PM   #27
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IMO inexperienced boaters have a greater tendency to over rev when docking if they have single lever controls.
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Old 01-29-2020, 04:37 PM   #28
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Another vote dual levers and cables. I like the simplicity.
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Old 01-29-2020, 06:53 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
This is a really good point - on a double-engine boat, it makes more sense to have dual controls so the gears are isolated from the throttles. On a single-engine such as my Willard, that goes away. A full-keel displacement single engine boat often requires swinging the rudder with throttle-blasts at judicious moments, which is where the lever-mixup can easily occur.
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Old 01-29-2020, 07:10 PM   #30
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I had Morse single lever controls on my last boat. I hated them. They would stick at the most inopportune times. You would think you were in neutral and you weren't. It was not a maintenance situation as I bought the boat new. There were 3 of the same boat at our marina and they all did this. These were mechanical shifters so I cannot give an opinion on electronic.
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Old 01-29-2020, 07:52 PM   #31
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Here are the photos of the Kobelt controls.
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:19 PM   #32
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Here are the photos of the Kobelt controls.
Thanks - sent a PM. Will need to validate these are viable for multi-station config.

Peter (MV Weebles)
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:31 PM   #33
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I changed my single lever control 2 years ago and Morse were on my lit but price was too high. These are high end controls and well used among fishermen boats. I installed seastar controls, while obviously of lesser quality (meaning some plastic parts) they are far enough for my usage and revealed to be comfortable to use.
Levers are one things but cables make also a difference, if nicely moving and lubricated there is no sticking issue, remember a lever is just... a lever.

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Old 01-29-2020, 09:12 PM   #34
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We've gone back and forth between single and dual controls any number of times on different boats, and I'd have to say that I'd be happy with either. As RTF mentioned, during docking maneuvers the throttle rarely needs to be touched, so a dual lever system kind of ensures no lever overreach.
We had to replace the old single lever electronic control on Blue Sky, and went with a mechanical Kobelt double lever system. Comparing the internals between the Kobelt and Morse controls was interesting. I can't remember the cables we used (single station) but the controls are very light to the touch, easily as light as the old electronic control.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:31 PM   #35
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I’ve operated boats with both single lever and two lever controls. I much prefer single lever. Possum had Kobelt single lever controls. Never had a problem giving too much throttle. There was quite a bit of travel when you shifted into forward or reverse before the throttle advanced.
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Old 01-29-2020, 09:51 PM   #36
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My boat is a twin and had dual function controls on the flybridge when I bought it. It also had them at the lower helm -- but they were disconnected. According to a prior owner, they had never been connected, but I figure the first owner must have disconnected them for some reason.

I (re)connected the lower station using the seastar system with station selector. At the expense of needing to rotate a lever to switch between upper and lower, this choice eliminated any possibility of a miscalibration between upper and lower w.r.t. gear selection.

The installation took two afternoons and works beautifully. It went particularly easily because I didnt need to change the cables coming down from the flybridge. I just moved them to the seastar units and ran new cables from the lower controls and selector to those units, and then from those units to the engines and transmissions.

I basically use the lower helm to bump the engines while docking. While in Califonia in my old boat, I used to use it for night, fog, and bad weather operation in open, deep, and quiet waters -- but havent had that use case in Florida.

I can take some pictures and post next time I'm at the boat and answer any questions about the system installation.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:04 PM   #37
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Don’t know about this

Quote:
Originally Posted by syjos View Post
With single lever control, it's too easy to shift past neutral or not stay in neutral long enough for the transmission to slow down. Some marine transmission require shifting at lower RPM.

With a double, there is a delay long enough for the tranny to slow when moving hand from throttle to gear lever.
I have Micro commander single lever electronic throttles. Forward, neutral and reverse detents are pronounced. Could I over shoot? yes, but it would be obvious.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:20 PM   #38
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I have Micro commander single lever electronic throttles. Forward, neutral and reverse detents are pronounced. Could I over shoot? yes, but it would be obvious.
Microcommander and most electronic controls have an adjustable delay in the action to allow the transmission to spool down.
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Old 01-29-2020, 10:29 PM   #39
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Also, it is pretty hard, I find, to shift past neutral. It is a very wide gear on the controls. In other words, the control has to be moved quite a distance forward or backward from the center of neutral to the point where it shifts into forward or reverse and the throttle starts advancing.

It is easier, I think, if rushed and unpracticed, to apply more throttle than intended when shifting out of neutral just by rushing and pushing past the detent into gear and further into the throttle range than intended.
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Old 01-29-2020, 11:35 PM   #40
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Microcommander and most electronic controls have an adjustable delay in the action to allow the transmission to spool down.
Just a quick side note about electronic controls.

1. Yes, delay is there and adjustable. However, years of muscle memory is not instantly adaptable. I had to re-learn control behavior to account for the “move-the-lever-then-wait-a-beat” phenomenon. Like when you read a book and the author notes “and a beat”. Don’t try to impact the throttle until after “the beat”.

2. Electronic controls seem to move more smoothly and with less effort than cable controls. At least in my experience. At first it was easy for me to overshoot the throttle (after waiting a beat) and it got me in trouble a time or two. But that’s just me. Perhaps my controls lacked a friction adjustment.

Also re Kobelt - i thought a unique feature was that Kobelt had/used ball-bearing “lined” cables. Maybe not the case?

Sorry - don’t mean to hijack or derail this thread, but I thought these comments and question to be relevant to the larger discussion that’s emerged.
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