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Old 01-16-2021, 03:55 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
Notice how long your engine takes to heat up at an idle at the dock? The thermostats are closed and there is no cooling from raw water taking place. If the impeller is removed or lubed, likewise the cutlass bearing, you don't need a cooling flow to do tests, unless the test will take longer than the coolant to heat.

If you block the wheel so it can't turn, you don't even need water, just pull the impeller. This protects the ground crew; just don't put it in gear.
Last time that I winterized myself,the impeller was toasted so was not pumping the antifreeze. One thing I noticed is that without water the exhaust is warming up pretty fast and I am not sure how long it would take to melt down the waterlock. My guess is that running without water for more than 2 minutes would be a treat to it.

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Old 01-16-2021, 05:27 PM   #22
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Of course you are right, Lou! My boat is dry-stacked so I totally forgot the exhaust. Too late to delete.
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Old 01-16-2021, 06:44 PM   #23
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Of course you are right, Lou! My boat is dry-stacked so I totally forgot the exhaust. Too late to delete.
I wish I had a dry exhaust and keel cooler, oh yes I wish!!!!

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Old 01-16-2021, 07:02 PM   #24
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Right. I didn't think through my original comment. Thanks for calling that out Lou. No load EGTs don't get that high, so I doubt there would be a melt down. But a valid concern.
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Old 01-16-2021, 08:20 PM   #25
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Thanks for the great tips and info. Still saving money and drooling.
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Old 01-16-2021, 09:00 PM   #26
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A number of years ago I watched a guy set a old aluminum boat filled with water under his boat in the boat yard. It captured 95% of the water that ran out the exhaust and he added water as the water level dropped in the aluminum boat. He ran a hose through a removed thru hull into the aluminum boat. The aluminum transferred most of the heat away. Said he learned the trick from a guy in Florida that did the same for his AC units in the yard.
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Old 01-22-2021, 02:35 PM   #27
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This is not a good idea. City water pressure is usually much higher than what your raw water pump puts out. You are lucky that excess water volume under higher pressure didn't back up into your exhaust manifold and through your valves into the cylinders.

If you do this you should only turn on the water faucet so a small stream of water comes out the exhaust, not the full blast. Any small amount will provide adequate cooling.
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Old 01-22-2021, 03:36 PM   #28
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A simple solution is a Sea Flush adapter. I use it to winterize the engines. Take the top off the strainer and remove the basket. Stick the Sea Flush in and have a 5 gallon bucket to draw the water in from. No modifications needed of no need to remove the impeller. It takes just a minute or two to do it.
Something like this? Would suggest NOT turning water on until engine is started to prevent flooding the exhaust. Preferred would be taking inlet off thru hull and put into an open bucket, but understand that can be difficult.

https://trac-online.com/product/trac-flushcaps/

Question for the OP. Why are you asking? General information or perhaps you're in a cold climate and seeking to do an out-of-water purchase survey? If the latter, would be difficult to do a proper engine inspection without putting it under load.

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Old 01-22-2021, 03:44 PM   #29
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The Sea Flush adapter has a pickup hose that is designed to go into a 5 gallon bucket. You fill the bucket and let the engine suck the water in on it’s own. The water isn’t under pressure. It takes the place of the strainers top. The Trac adapters have a garden hose adapter built into them. I use them to winterize the A/Cs and genset. But I use a 5 gallon bucket and let the antifreeze gravity feed into the strainer. I don’t hook a pressure hose to them either.
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Old 01-22-2021, 03:49 PM   #30
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The Sea Flush adapter has a pickup hose that is designed to go into a 5 gallon bucket. You fill the bucket and let the engine suck the water in on it’s own. The water isn’t under pressure. It takes the place of the strainers top. The Trac adapters have a garden hose adapter built into them. I use them to winterize the A/Cs and genset. But I use a 5 gallon bucket and let the antifreeze gravity feed into the strainer. I don’t hook a pressure hose to them either.
Ahh.... That makes much more sense. Thanks for the clarification. I learned something here today, as usual.
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:01 PM   #31
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Disconnect the sea water intake from its thru hull and stick it in a pail of water.
Keep the pail overflowing , any extra water will collect in the bilge , where it can be pumped overboard or run out thru the garboard drain.
This was my technique until I bought a Groco Filter adapter that accepts a garden hose. I don't have to disconnect anything, simply change the top. To winterize I fill the pail with anti-freeze.
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Old 01-22-2021, 07:26 PM   #32
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This is not a good idea. City water pressure is usually much higher than what your raw water pump puts out. You are lucky that excess water volume under higher pressure didn't back up into your exhaust manifold and through your valves into the cylinders.

If you do this you should only turn on the water faucet so a small stream of water comes out the exhaust, not the full blast. Any small amount will provide adequate cooling.
I would agree with this post where the user is closing off the seacock. However, leaving it open allows the city water pressure a relief valve as it flows both ways from the rinse input site between the seacock and the pump. Been doing so for five years after every run, full blast "city" water pressure.
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Old 01-25-2021, 02:25 PM   #33
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My boat is in my yard for the winter. I start the engine a couple times a month and warm it up to operating temp. With keel cooling there is no problem, just watch the temp gauge.
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Old 01-30-2021, 08:02 AM   #34
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Great info and replies. I was asking because I have only had outboard motors and I am able to work on them in the driveway. Planning for a future with a project boat. Not too much of a project I hope.
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Old 01-30-2021, 08:22 AM   #35
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This was my technique until I bought a Groco Filter adapter that accepts a garden hose. I don't have to disconnect anything, simply change the top. To winterize I fill the pail with anti-freeze.
Please, two things.

Is the garden hose big enough, flow rate wise for a 350hp motor?

Also, the muffler must hold at lest 6 gals of water. Yes? So be the time it flows out and over board you must be using 10 to 12 gals of AF. Yes?
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Old 01-30-2021, 10:53 AM   #36
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The yard I'm in uses a system I've never seen before. Might be common, but I've never seen it. They have an open top wood box with a garden hose connection and a rubber seal around the top. They jack this up to the hull around the water intake and hook up the hose to an AF tank. Tank has a pump inside and they place it under the exhaust outlet so it catches and recycles the AF. They then just start the engine and run till straight AF comes out the exhaust. Way quicker and easier than hooking anything up inside the boat and it uses much less AF due to the recycling. Doesn't over pressurize the system with AF as it's just a bilge pump and doesn't make much pressure. Pretty slick, it only took a few minutes to pickle each engine. The AF they use comes in concentrate form and they just add a little as it gets diluted from the sea water in the exhausts. This is in fresh water so no problem with salt. It would work in salt too, but maybe you wouldn't want to capture and reuse the AF.
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