Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-14-2019, 04:23 PM   #21
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,623
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDW View Post
SoCal has no lobster pots - in comparison to Maine. The lobstermen of Maine have no restraint at all: pots all over the middle of marked channels, all around fuel docks, throughout anchorages, middle of harbor fairways. Several times I've had them dropped well within my anchor circle while I watched. They just don't care. Yeah, that's a broad brush and I'm sure some are more responsible than others. Add toggles, some current, a few white caps and avoiding them in some places is impossible.
There are Dungeness crab traps permitted north of Pt Arfuello, just north of Santa Barbara. Dungeness are fished in very deep water well offshore. Transits along the coast routinely involve overnight passages so a bit of luck is in order. It's a problem.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 06:38 PM   #22
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques Raoul View Post
Thanks to all, if it can save me once from rope entanglement on the shaft propeller, it is a GO to install one. Just need to figure out the space between the propeller and the bearing which is occupy by the zinc anode.
Jacques
Jacques, ou gardes tu ton bateau?

(Excuse the French )

L
__________________

Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 07:40 PM   #23
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,550
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
There are Dungeness crab traps permitted north of Pt Arfuello, just north of Santa Barbara. Dungeness are fished in very deep water well offshore. Transits along the coast routinely involve overnight passages so a bit of luck is in order. It's a problem.
Headed up that way in March/April.
  • Are all of the Dungeness crab pots north of Arguello?
  • How deep of water are they setting them?

Looks like they have delayed the season opening several times, and its now set to open Dec 31, 2019.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 08:26 PM   #24
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher500 View Post
Headed up that way in March/April.
  • Are all of the Dungeness crab pots north of Arguello?
  • How deep of water are they setting them?

Looks like they have delayed the season opening several times, and its now set to open Dec 31, 2019.
Most are north of Monterey. Arguello is the southern limit of Dungeness fishing. I can't help on depth as I constantly see traps in much deeper water than expected, but I don't know squat about crabbing. They seem to set in really deep water. 400-feet is not unusual. They are more concentrated outside larger ports - Monterey, San Francisco, Noyo/Ft Bragg. Crescent City, etc. There used to be a lane 5-miles offshore that was supposed to be for tow barges and the crabbers knew not to set there or risk losing their gear, but it didn't seem to work out that way. Traps aren't nearly as dense as Maine I suppose, but they are out there. You'll see some still in March. Can be pretty breezy headed north in April.
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 08:40 PM   #25
Veteran Member
 
City: Grand Manan,N.B.
Vessel Name: Puffin II
Vessel Model: Mascot 28 PH Motorsailer
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 65





http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ts-223111.html
__________________
:) My personal experience &/or my personal opinion-feel free to ignore.
deblen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 08:48 PM   #26
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,550
Thanks MVW. I am sure you experienced your share of weather when driving Nordhavns up the coast.

In my younger days I did a run on an old oil tanker: LA - SF, SF - LA; repeat, for 4 months. IE, numerous runs and up and down the coast. It was during the Winter and I still remember how quickly the wind and swell kicked up when North of Conception.

I am a free man come March 13th and throwing my alarm clock away, so off I go. I have no desire to fight Mother Nature and will be monitoring the weather closely and likely only get to the Central Coast. The following year, hopefully further north.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 09:00 PM   #27
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,623
Round Pt Conception around midnight. Anchor at Coho if needed. It's a decent anchorage as the kelp keeps the swell down. Pt San Luis is a good anchorage. For some reason, I had more issues getting through the central coast than other spots on the coast (San Martin). Once you're past that central area, not too bad and the ports are closer. I've never stopped at San Simeon so don't know.

Its a beautiful ride. You'll likely see a few whales. You won't find whole days of goof weather, but mostly slop in the afternoons so workable. Chuck Hawley, of West marine fame, once said April is the most consistently windy month along the coast. Not the highest sends, but more consistent. That said, junk usually only lasts for a few hours.

How far are you going? All the way to puget sound? Hopefully, I'm headed north in May or so.
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2019, 09:08 PM   #28
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 2,623
A little tip that seemed to hold true along the California coast. Small white caps first form at around 17-kts. If you see them before 11am, will be a long day. After 1pm, will be a good day. During the afternoon when winds pickup, stay 1 to 1-1/2 miles off the surf line and you'll knock down about half the junk. At night, you have to move further offshore regardless, but usually winds die down.

I miss the sunsets. And the first cup of hot coffee in the morning.
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
Current Location: Ensenada MX
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 10:11 AM   #29
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,550
OP, keep us posted if you install one. I think it’s a smart thing to do. The two people I noted were both in Mission Bay, CA. The person who wheeled it up and damaged his prop was a dock neighbor and definitely not a novice boater. And, sorry about the thread drift...

MVW, thanks for the Intel. All of my previous boating has been south of Conception. I have also been reading Fagans book recently. We spend a lot of time in the Southern Channel Islands in the Summer, so I want to be down here for that window. I am starting to rethink the March/April departure to head up to Central CA and the Northern Channel Islands and wait until early Sep. when the winds are at their calmest. The Sep to Nov timeframe have always been my favorite months on the water. Keep me posted regarding your May departure though. When I retire, I want to have general plans, but also not, if you know what I mean.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 11:34 AM   #30
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 1,666
That's my video, shot from my sailboat. This is no where near the thickest that you will find there, when they are really thick there is no time at all to be holding a video camera. Believe me, the pots in California a very few and far between in comparison. I've cruised the length of both coasts - nothing compares to Maine. In Maine there are more than 3 million lobster pots, more pots than people.
DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 12:20 PM   #31
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, FL near Panama City
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,285
If you just want to have extra insurance against rope entanglement for one trip, investigate SALCA at Sacrificial Anode Line Cutter Assembly Zinc | Sea Shield Marine
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 02:57 PM   #32
Guru
 
kchace's Avatar
 
City: Brookline, NH
Vessel Name: Blue Heaven
Vessel Model: Albin 43 classic double cabin, twin 135 Lehmans
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,054
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDW View Post
... I've cruised the length of both coasts - nothing compares to Maine. In Maine there are more than 3 million lobster pots, more pots than people.
I totally agree. And with about 3000 miles of coastline, it equates to about 1000 pots per mile. Its fun to say the least, but my wife and I HAVE gotten used to it. I used to worry if there were more than even a few in sight at any one time. Now if we miss it by at least 10 feet I'm happy. But with twin props and no kind of protective pocket - no night cruising in Maine for me....

Ken
kchace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 09:37 AM   #33
Member
 
Jacques Raoul's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Vessel Name: DELFI
Vessel Model: MAINSHIP 34T 1979
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 17
Lou, for winter I keep my boat at YCPAA and for this year I am your neighbor. Jacques
Attached Thumbnails
20191004_102518.jpg  
Jacques Raoul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 10:40 AM   #34
Guru
 
TDunn's Avatar
 
City: Maine Coast
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nunes Brothers Raised Deck Cruiser
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 890
Submerged floats mostly happen in high current areas. You can usually avoid them by staying out of those areas when the tide is running hard. I say usually because I have snagged two trap lines in 25 years. Both were submerged by current. It also helps if you understand how the lobster fishers set traps. If you look around you will notice clusters of traps with completely open areas 100 yards away. It pays to look ahead and adjust course accordingly.
TDunn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 12:34 PM   #35
Member
 
Jacques Raoul's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Vessel Name: DELFI
Vessel Model: MAINSHIP 34T 1979
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 17
I was planning to go see a cousin living in the Cap Cod area, Falmouth. I think I won't go, too many lobster trap.
Jacques Raoul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 03:19 PM   #36
TF Site Team
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 4,211
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDW View Post
That's my video, shot from my sailboat. This is no where near the thickest that you will find there, when they are really thick there is no time at all to be holding a video camera. Believe me, the pots in California a very few and far between in comparison. I've cruised the length of both coasts - nothing compares to Maine. In Maine there are more than 3 million lobster pots, more pots than people.
WOW!

And we have the nerve to complain about the proliferation of crab trap floats around here!

Our Crabtrap floats are an insignificant problem, with the exception of those ignorant crabbers who use a floating line. Most use a sinking line and all you see is the float, which, unless hit dead on, will bounce away, at trawler speeds. At greater speed, you need to be maintaining a proper lookout to a much greater degree.
__________________
Keith
koliver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 07:12 PM   #37
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,550
MVW, sent you a PM.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 07:29 PM   #38
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 1,666
Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
WOW!

And we have the nerve to complain about the proliferation of crab trap floats around here!

Our Crabtrap floats are an insignificant problem, with the exception of those ignorant crabbers who use a floating line. Most use a sinking line and all you see is the float, which, unless hit dead on, will bounce away, at trawler speeds. At greater speed, you need to be maintaining a proper lookout to a much greater degree.
In Atlantic Canada there are some around NB, PEI, and NS. But there they tend to be in a limited depths, and there is a legal season outside of which you don't see them. Not a real problem. In Maine, year around and in depths from 10' to 400'. I've tangled with one 15 miles offshore, 300' didn't really expect to see them but they were pretty thick (and it was 4 am making landfall from Cape Sable, couldn't really see them).

The the PNW the only real problem is the idiot amateurs who drop their crab and prawn pots all around an anchorage making it unusable for anchoring.
DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 08:19 PM   #39
Guru
 
City: Here
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,946
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDW View Post
You'll have no more trouble in the ICW and Bahamas than you do in the Thousand Islands with crab and lobster pots. Unless you plan to go through Maine - that is a whole different universe.
Chesapeake, Delaware, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Gulf side of Florida
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 08:29 PM   #40
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 7,509
If you do install them make sure to shorten any tow line before you back down on your anchor (even if you do think the line floats). Ask me how I know!
__________________

menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×