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Old 02-28-2020, 09:45 AM   #21
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Lehmans return little to none. My 900's seem to do a good job.As I understand it the "turbo" or "spin" effect of the raycors is for water removal mostly. But the big canisters, almost 2 qt. seem to act as a big sediment bowl and they do trap water effectively. I sometimes get a little when I empty the canisters.

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Old 03-06-2020, 10:21 PM   #22
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Anyone have any idea how much return to expect from a 40 year old Perkins 4-236? I too have been planing to change to the dual Racor.
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Old 03-07-2020, 06:53 AM   #23
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I have dual Racor 1000s (from the previous engine) on my 135 HP John Deere. Maximum fuel flow is 35 GPH. Normal cruising flow is around 20 GPH. Ski is correct that everything that would settle to the bottom of your fuel tank, falls to the bottom of the bowl in the Racor. Only the lightest particles travel up to the filter element.

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If flow rate is too low to get good rotational speed in the bottom, then flow rate is also slow enough that simple gravity will separate out the water. I have used over sized Racors in many apps and have had no problem with them separating out water.
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Old 03-07-2020, 08:47 AM   #24
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Wouldn't this be the same with an all-metal filter with a bottom drain? Open the drain before each cruise to check for water or crud? Seeing crud or modest amounts of water in a Racor bowl can be difficult anyway, especially with those equipped with a metal shield which obscures the bottom half of the clear bowl where for what one is looking resides.
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I have dual Racor 1000s (from the previous engine) on my 135 HP John Deere. Maximum fuel flow is 35 GPH. Normal cruising flow is around 20 GPH. Ski is correct that everything that would settle to the bottom of your fuel tank, falls to the bottom of the bowl in the Racor. Only the lightest particles travel up to the filter element.



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Old 03-07-2020, 09:19 AM   #25
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Wouldn't this be the same with an all-metal filter with a bottom drain? Open the drain before each cruise to check for water or crud? Seeing crud or modest amounts of water in a Racor bowl can be difficult anyway, especially with those equipped with a metal shield which obscures the bottom half of the clear bowl where for what one is looking resides.
The bottom metal shield obscures less than an ounce of the bottom of the Racor bowl. A small light shining from the opposite side makes it easy to see the contents near the very bottom. If there is significant water in the bowl, it's easily spotted by the color difference, especially with dyed fuel.

If doing an engine room check while underway, doing a visual inspection through a transparent bowl makes far more sense than opening a drain on an operating engine in seas.

While I have no statistical evidence to back it up, I would guess that a higher percentage of people doing an engine room check before getting underway, are much more likely to visually inspect the Racor bowl than those who would have to draw a filter sample, analyze it, and dispose of it.

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Old 03-07-2020, 09:30 AM   #26
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Do any TF members see water in their Racors? If so, where did it come from? Then what was the fix?
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Old 03-07-2020, 10:05 AM   #27
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I had a small amount of water and crud (most probably asphaltene) appear in the Racor bowl of the fuel polishing system when transferring fuel from the storage tank to the day tank in January. I assume it was from one of three fuel docks I purchased from between October and January. I think I know which one, but won't say without proof. Some facilities don't utilize a filter where the supply hose attaches to the pump.

As all my fuel goes through the polishing system before going into the day tank, I'm not worried about an engine related problem. As the fuel fill gets a new oring every year and is protected from weather and seas along with the tank vents, I'm confident it was a fuel retailer problem (crud in their storage tank). The tank is angled to completely drain through the transfer plumbing so no loose contaminants should remain in the tank. I will continue to monitor fuel coming out of the tank, but feel the system has resolved the problem.

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Old 03-07-2020, 11:56 AM   #28
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I mounted a small LED light behind the Racor bowl so I can see what is in the bowl more easily. They come on with the other LED lights in the engine room.
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Old 03-07-2020, 01:40 PM   #29
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I mounted a small LED light behind the Racor bowl so I can see what is in the bowl more easily. They come on with the other LED lights in the engine room.
That's a damn good idea. Thanks!
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Old 03-07-2020, 02:25 PM   #30
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That's a damn good idea. Thanks!
Ditto!
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Old 03-07-2020, 02:43 PM   #31
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I mounted a small LED light behind the Racor bowl so I can see what is in the bowl more easily. They come on with the other LED lights in the engine room.
Another project to add to the list.

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Old 03-07-2020, 03:26 PM   #32
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Ok back to basics. Jeez lights vacuum monitors ! sheesh. Whatever next ?
Irrespective of the engine, it depends on your throttle setting how much you will 'return' as your lift pump capacity must be able to cope with your engine full throttle needs.
Why you guys bother yourself with all that mental masturbation really amazes me ?
Diesels are simple. Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow. Clean lubricant, clean fuel and clean air, job done !
Why oh why the constant 'opinions', facts are fact, end of story, why you feel you need to add expensive Racors is completely beyond me.
EVERY diesel manufacturer specifies the microns of their fuel filters and their engines go on to perform thousands of hours perfect service.
I don't need to massage your ego's but sometimes you guys need some straight talking.Get the facts.
Apologies but I'm an old fashioned hands on guy.
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Old 03-07-2020, 04:29 PM   #33
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Apologies but I'm an old fashioned hands on guy.
Glad simplicity works for you. I prefer PM (Preventative Maintenance) over repair. I prefer gauges over failure alarms. Were you the one who said, " Cruising is boat repair in exotic locations"?

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Old 03-07-2020, 05:14 PM   #34
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Besides, I like working on my boat, so if I can add something as simple and cheap as 3 LED lights so it makes it easier to check the Racors, why not. It also gives me something to do over the winter. I was adding some LED lighting to the engine room so a few more isn’t a big deal.

My problem will be when I can’t find anything else to do on my boat is when I usually sell the boat and start on another one. But my deal here is I cannot go any bigger or heavier due to the travel lift is maxed out with our current boat. And I have already talked to the yard owner and he won’t buy a bigger lift just so I can buy a bigger boat. Hmm...
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Old 03-08-2020, 07:57 AM   #35
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The big 1000 filters hold 2x more than the 900 and cost little more.
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Old 03-08-2020, 12:39 PM   #36
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Just bought 3 Racor 1000 30 micron elements with the newer water block material. Under $12 a piece delivered. Wish everything in boating was this cheap.

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Old 03-09-2020, 10:41 AM   #37
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Old school diesel engines generally had very low return flow rates. I recall in general that the Detroit 2 stroke engines ( like all 53, 71, 92 series) had a lot more flow than a typical 4 stroke in those days. The Cummins PT fuel systems also flowed a lot more back to tank which created a lot more heat in the fuel tanks. That flow was designed in to those unit injectors, which was for cooling the injector, along with the usual function of purging air from the system. With most of those older engines, many naturally aspirated, cooling was not a big deal as they only produced 120 hp from a 400ish cu in engine. I know the OP was talking about a 120 hp FL but there is a huge difference in return flow between those and say a high hp 6-71, and an even bigger difference when talking about newer high pressure common rail engines, intercooled and aftercooled, that are producing 350 - 400 hp from a similar cid engine. The hpcr engine returns a lot of fuel, partly because it can burn 20+ gallons per hour and needs a steady supply, but it also needs to cool the injectors with high rates of return fuel.

The best thing about Racor filters is being able to see if any water or solids get into the clear bowl if you have enough light. Great idea to add a little light behind the bowl! In the truck and heavy equipment world, a lot of these "bowl" style filters are being removed from systems because they are so prone to leaking air into the fuel and since they are designed as a "suction" filter it does happen. Not a problem on a polishing system. I would lean toward a 1 or 2 or both selector using a pair of Fleetguard FS1000 with water drain. So much quicker and easier to change on a rocking boat which is when you will have to do the emergency change. Read Tony Athens articles.
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Old 03-09-2020, 11:12 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Irish Rambler View Post
why you feel you need to add expensive Racors is completely beyond me.
See below.

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Originally Posted by Irish Rambler View Post
Clean lubricant, clean fuel and clean air, job done !
See above.


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EVERY diesel manufacturer specifies the microns of their fuel filters and their engines go on to perform thousands of hours perfect service.
Yes, and that fuel filter is very hard to monitor, and if it starts to clog, one doesn't know until there is a performance problem, e.g. slow start, surging, etc.

Hours aren't necessarily a good gauge when fuel quality as it exists in the tanks is variable.

It also doesn't filter water or indicate the presence of water -- which I think we can all agree is bad.

O-rings can go bad and leak water into tanks. Condensation in humid environments can add water to tanks. It is rare, but blowing wind or breaking waves can force air in through vents, even with loops.

Recreational vessels don't always use fuel at a rate aligned with their fuel tank capacities, so owners often leave relatively little fuel to try to keep it fresh -- leaving air for condensation. Or, they try to keep it full to keep the air minimal -- leading the fuel to get old and things grow in it. Neither is optimal.

A primary fuel filter with water separator and glass bowl with vacuum gauge provides an easy way of monitoring for water, monitoring filter status, improving the service interval, improving confidence, and changing filters more rapidly while underway.
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Old 03-09-2020, 11:35 AM   #39
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I have operated hundreds of boats both as a commercial operator and as a captain for a major boat dealership.


I have come across small amounts of water in Racors through the years in many Racor filters....


How it got there....I have no clue...


But the point is it WAS there and alerted me to be careful .... as lots more may follow. It was many time easier shining a flashlight to the clear bowl from on deck while underway than going into the engineroom and draining a metal bowl...


Hmmmm....maybe that's the whole concept of Racor clear bowls versus others.
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Old 03-09-2020, 03:11 PM   #40
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Ok back to basics. Jeez lights vacuum monitors ! sheesh. Whatever next ?
Irrespective of the engine, it depends on your throttle setting how much you will 'return' as your lift pump capacity must be able to cope with your engine full throttle needs.
Why you guys bother yourself with all that mental masturbation really amazes me ?
Diesels are simple. Suck, Squeeze, Bang, Blow. Clean lubricant, clean fuel and clean air, job done !
Why oh why the constant 'opinions', facts are fact, end of story, why you feel you need to add expensive Racors is completely beyond me.
EVERY diesel manufacturer specifies the microns of their fuel filters and their engines go on to perform thousands of hours perfect service.
I don't need to massage your ego's but sometimes you guys need some straight talking.Get the facts.
Apologies but I'm an old fashioned hands on guy.
+1 Irish on the Racors. Some guys like to be able to see the fuel bowl to see water and debris. Not I. I gave away my Racors and installed Davco truck filter assemblies. The clear bowl on top tells me when it is time to change the filter. No guesswork. No vacuum gauge needed. Bad load of fuel? I would see it in the filter getting used up more quickly. I don't have a polisher, don't want one, don't need one. Just got back from our first spring outing here in Galesville, just south of Annapolis, MD. I drained a bit of fuel from the metal, non see through bowls before leaving. No water, no debris. Why would there be. I'm still working on a fill-up in Norfolk from a year ago. No debris, no filters plugged up. Why would I need to check the bowls every time out. Where would all that water come from? Each to his own. Do you need Racors? Do you need to polish fuel? Do you need day tanks? I say no. Doesn't hurt anything, however. Perhaps it helps that my fuel feed is from the bottom of the tanks. Just another opinion. Not right, not wrong.
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