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Old 07-27-2017, 10:24 PM   #21
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If you get a tiny outboard to store in a bag, remember the gasoline will go bad. Propane doesn't go bad and they make some nice little propane powered outboards now. LUHR is the brand IIRC. You just screw one of those green camping propnae bottles into it. I'm thinking of the tiny 2hp model for plan B, not the high hp units.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:49 PM   #22
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I am going to start playing with an old windsurfer sail and mast on our tinny soon and steering it like a windsurfer or using an oar as a sweep.

Not expecting good results but it may be fun and it may be better than rowing.
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Old 07-27-2017, 11:01 PM   #23
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I am going to start playing with an old windsurfer sail and mast on our tinny soon and steering it like a windsurfer or using an oar as a sweep.

Not expecting good results but it may be fun and it may be better than rowing.
A kite is actually not a bad idea.

For me, plan A is an outboard I have confidence in

Plan B is a few tools and spare parts.

Plan C is a handheld and or visual comms with passerby's

I would do a PLB or Epirb on the dinghy if I was likely to be out of range of anyone with the Vhf for more than a day, which is basically never.
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Old 07-28-2017, 01:37 AM   #24
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I think a spare engine for a dinghy is going too far. I'm surprised a handheld wouldn't be able to reach the mother ship but that's not the focus of the thread. To me, and my free opinion on this isn't worth what you're paying for it, but if you need extra security I'd suggest a sailing dinghy that's got an easy rig to assemble.
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Old 07-28-2017, 01:48 AM   #25
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Life is not without its risks, but carrying a spare engine on a dinghy seems an extreme measure, suggesting one would be better off staying on the couch.
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Old 07-28-2017, 02:05 AM   #26
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I want to know what motor you have . One of those Chinese copy's LOL
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Old 07-28-2017, 02:30 AM   #27
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Life is not without its risks, but carrying a spare engine on a dinghy seems an extreme measure, suggesting one would be better off staying on the couch.
I agree with you, Mark.
Generally you aren't in a life threatening situation if your dinghy motor fails.
It may be inconvenient that you can't get back to the mothership but your're not going to die; especially if you carry a small anchor to keep you being blown out to sea.
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Old 07-28-2017, 03:54 AM   #28
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Bought a dinghy with a locker for a reason. In that locker are stored a handheld
VHF radio, flashlight, tools and an anchor with 75 feet of line.

As Larry implied our dinghy and those of the other cruisers are our lifelines, used all the time. With a hundred dinghies in any anchorage someones outboard stops working frequently and we cruisers are quite familiar with towing each other back to our respective boats. In the last six years it has happened to me twice.

The VHF and anchor are important as we frequently make several mile runs at night. We rely on the ability to stay put (the anchor) while we wait for help.
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Old 07-28-2017, 04:41 AM   #29
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"If that's the answer, then I'm getting something rowable. Mine isn't for any meaningful distance."

"Certainly worth adding, but still want plan B."

A second boat ? Or dump the condom boat?

Many aluminum skiffs can be rowed , are fast under power and can be dragged up on the shore.

Most are 1/2 or less the weight to handle.
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Old 07-28-2017, 06:20 AM   #30
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My tender is a twelve foot aluminum boat that is very easy to row, such that I often don't put the outboard on it, I row. Long oars help a lot.
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Old 07-28-2017, 06:48 AM   #31
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Rowed and let the wind push my RIB back to the mother ship. An hour to go maybe a half a mile. I think I could row a cast iron bathtub faster.
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Row till you drop.
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If that's the answer, then I'm getting something rowable. Mine isn't for any meaningful distance.

Walker Bay makes a rigid dinghy with an inflatable collar option. That approach could mean RIB-like advantages in a rowable dinghy. The WB dinghy is said to row OK, and I'd guess certainly better than most RIBs. The WB dinghy also has an optional sail kit. The WB one doesn't do high speeds with the motor, though, if that's also a requirement.

Might be other makers offer a similar approach. And/or might be possible to add an inflatable collar to any decent rigid dinghy.

?

Might be slightly easier/better rowing on most RIBs by simply improving the oars. Meaning use real ones, instead of the abbreviated versions typically included with most RIBs.

Another approach might be doing your exploring with a canoe. Square-stern, add a motor... paddle home under duress if necessary. Maybe try a kayak paddle instead of a typical single canoe paddle. Fill most of the canoe with inflatable bags when interior space isn't needed (whitewater bags), remove those when you're hauling groceries.

Could maybe keep the RIB, add a canoe to your boat, use the (motorized?) canoe for longer distance exploring, use the RIB when you need a short-trip station wagon.

??

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Old 07-28-2017, 06:50 AM   #32
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Ted, I know you are probably well past most of this discussion, but you also probably already knew there are few reasonable alternatives other than a fine rowing vessel with oars as backup.

But for newcomers to dingies.....I guess my rowing in college must have helped me.

While she is no pretty pulling skiff, my RHIB rows well enough that I can row back from my expeditions if necessary. For most, dont just assume a hard dingy will row better than a RHIB, try one before making that compromise. I have rowed a lot of hard dingies that I think are worse than my RHIB. Now soft bottom inflatables are another category all together except maybe a few styles.

I hope everyone knows you row inflatables a little different....short choppy pulls versus normal pulling?

If the wind and tide are going to be against me and a long distance, I rethink my options....even to the point of walking it along shore as an option.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:57 AM   #33
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when we cruised the Canadian canal systems for 2 years we carried a Merc 2.2 as a spare. It was 2 cycle so it could use gas mix we had for the Yamaha with a little more oil added.
We never needed it so I sold it for more than I paid for it.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:05 AM   #34
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Hand held VHF and Phone and be prepared to call for tow assistance or stranger assistance.

I don't go anywhere without my phone and no where on the water without a VHF.

Dinghy motor is more likely to fail and strand you than main boat. You use it to explore as we do and we might be far from the boat.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:41 AM   #35
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Is your engine electric start? I'd carry a small trolling motor. You'd be surprised how far a thirty pound thrust trolling motor will push you with even a small battery. A trolling motor can sit unused for years and still go when you hook it to a battery. It's also about half the weight of the smallest internal combustion engine. If you don't already have a battery on the dinghy, it might be worth carrying one.
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Old 07-28-2017, 11:33 AM   #36
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There has been some discussion of carrying a small second outboard in the dinghy. Given the frequency of outboard thefts in parts of the world I wonder how long an outboard not mounted but chained to the dinghy would last before being stolen.
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Old 07-28-2017, 11:41 AM   #37
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I use my dinghy to go exploring off the beaten path. Getting towed back or having cell service may not be an option (wouldn't have been available at Isle Royale). So as I was struggling to get back, my mind is going, "The first one was easy. This second one is your wakeup call. Hey stupid, what's plan B when you're 5 miles away? "

So I'm open to suggestions.

Ted
What is the goal here?
  • To be get back 5 miles without assistance?
  • To get to a place where (some type of) assistance can be contacted?
  • To be able to contact (some type of) assistance from where the failure occurs?
Then of course, what kind of assistance do you desire? A low-profile tow, or a high-profile, I'm-getting-swept-out-to-sea CG intervention?

Seems to me there would be different solutions: an additional engine to get back, maybe just oars to get ashore and find help, or (my choice) a PLB. Might seem to be overkill but I'd rather get too much help than too little.
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Old 07-28-2017, 12:57 PM   #38
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Some more information:

It appears that I won't be hearing back from my contact at the outboard motor manufacturer till Monday. Hope he's having a nice long weekend.

The outboard I have is a Lehr 9.9 that runs on propane. I knew the fuel wasn't bad as I cooked a pork tenderloin on the grill with it last night. For those that are unfamiliar with propane engines, the fuel comes out from the tank around 200 psi, is reduced in pressure through an orifice that generates a refrigeration effect, goes through a heat exchanger to stabilize the temperature, and then through a regulator in the carburetor to stabilize fuel delivery to the engine.

The first carburetor failed when the internal regulator died venting the excess propane through a safety valve. Lehr sent me a replacement carburetor, no charge, under warranty. This I installed and it worked flawlessly for 50 minutes and then suffered a similar type failure. It's my guess that the heat exchanger before the carburetor is the issue and caused both failures. My buddy who is a propane forklift mechanic, said these types of failures to the carburetor happen as a result of the heat exchanger not stabilizing the gas temperature. So at this point I believe the second failure was from not diagnosing correctly the cause of the first failure.


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I go places where the hand help won't reach anyone or I don't have cell phone service. Always travel with a PLB or an EPIRB, so ultimate rescue isn't the issue. Let's call them plan C. Still trying to figure out a self rescue plan B.

Ted
For those that missed the above, I go exploring places where other people are unlikely to pass by. Self help needs to be plan B.

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What is the goal here?
  • To be get back 5 miles without assistance?
  • To get to a place where (some type of) assistance can be contacted?
  • To be able to contact (some type of) assistance from where the failure occurs?
Then of course, what kind of assistance do you desire? A low-profile tow, or a high-profile, I'm-getting-swept-out-to-sea CG intervention?

Seems to me there would be different solutions: an additional engine to get back, maybe just oars to get ashore and find help, or (my choice) a PLB. Might seem to be overkill but I'd rather get too much help than too little.
Have much of this covered. Still need to be able to get back from 5+ miles unassisted.

Ted
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Old 07-28-2017, 03:29 PM   #39
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A kite is actually not a bad idea.

For me, plan A is an outboard I have confidence in

Plan B is a few tools and spare parts.

Plan C is a handheld and or visual comms with passerby's

I would do a PLB or Epirb on the dinghy if I was likely to be out of range of anyone with the Vhf for more than a day, which is basically never.
I already have A, B and C and also D, long oars.
I guess the sail is plan E.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:47 PM   #40
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Portable Foldable Travel Sail Kit for DIY Sailing Project.

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