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Old 04-29-2019, 07:56 PM   #21
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We had a 42 Hershine /Jefferson for 12 years that we lived aboard in the San Francisco Bay and cruised both coasts with. It had Range 4 200 turbos in it. They were completely reliable and only required to be preventively maintained.
My real question is do you really want a Mainship? They are not trawlers and only suitable for lakes and rivers as well as the protected parts of the ICW.
They steer like a drunken sailor due to poor hull design and tiny rudders. They are outright dangerous in a following sea as they want to pitch poll.
I would expand my search to a real trawler if I was you.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:44 AM   #22
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Dealing with my T6.354 Perkins

The intercooler on my Apollo 32 with it's 1982 T6. 354 Perkins is cracked and I can't imagine bothering to replace it given that I rarely run the engine over 1,600 rpm. I did replace the cast iron exhaust manifold with a stainless steel unit from Marine exhaust Systems in Alabama and the turbo adapter and dry elbow and wet elbow with stainless steel from Atlantic diesel.


I simply did not want the uncertainty of the cast iron that one could never tell when it was going to fail, or replacing the manifold every 4 years as preventative measure.


With its age and over 4,000 hrs. the engine burns no appreciable oil and delivers fuel consumption of ~1 gallon/hr. @ 8 knots. I think it's a great, simple and reliable unit that will likely outlast my days with a boat.
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Old 04-30-2019, 09:19 AM   #23
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Vessel Model: 34 Mainship I 1982 Perkins
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kit_L View Post
All the original Bowman heat exchanger parts are available from ASAP -Supplies, and at very reasonable prices. I just bought the two different rubber end caps for $90 AUD, and that included shipping.

Whole re-worked heat exchangers and parts are available from Tad Diesels:

TAD for Perkins Diesel Heat Exchangers, Perkins Marine Heat Exchangers, Perkins Diesel Parts, Perkins Engine Parts

I have a normally aspirated 6.3544 in Sea Biscuit; 1,250rpm pushes her along at 7kn in flat water. The engine sounds amazing, and mine was a factory rebuild, purchased locally, and now has about 250 hours on it. I know it will outlast me.
Thanks for the reply. Valuable info. Your boat is a beauty!
JJF
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Old 04-30-2019, 09:35 AM   #24
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City: Skillman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sally Ann View Post
We had a 42 Hershine /Jefferson for 12 years that we lived aboard in the San Francisco Bay and cruised both coasts with. It had Range 4 200 turbos in it. They were completely reliable and only required to be preventively maintained.
My real question is do you really want a Mainship? They are not trawlers and only suitable for lakes and rivers as well as the protected parts of the ICW.
They steer like a drunken sailor due to poor hull design and tiny rudders. They are outright dangerous in a following sea as they want to pitch poll.
I would expand my search to a real trawler if I was you.
As a Mainship owner, I agree with most of your observations: They are not blue sea trawlers, and the do not like following seas; however, they are excellent at what they were built for: comfort, economy, near shore coastal cruising--I've taken mine from NY harbor to Cape Cod, Miami, and points between. They handle rough water 4-5 foot seas, but depending on whether you are nosing into it or running ahead, you can get a good shoulder workout! I just love burning a gallon and a half diesel for hours on end at nine knots, don't you?
JJF
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:30 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiffany View Post
The intercooler on my Apollo 32 with it's 1982 T6. 354 Perkins is cracked and I can't imagine bothering to replace it given that I rarely run the engine over 1,600 rpm .
If the crack allows water to migrate from the wet to the air side you could have an issue. Not sure how limiting to 1600 RPM would prevent this.

Many Perkins engines have bitten the dust due to salt water intrusion through a faulty after/inner cooler. But I don't know your manifold and cooler setup so may be off base.
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Old 04-30-2019, 11:41 AM   #26
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If the crack allows water to migrate from the wet to the air side you could have an issue. Not sure how limiting to 1600 RPM would prevent this.

Many Perkins engines have bitten the dust due to salt water intrusion through a faulty after/inner cooler. But I don't know your manifold and cooler setup so may be off base.

Sunchaser, The intercooler is not receiving raw water, so the charge air is not receiving that increased horsepower benefit, so also no wet to dry side problem. The setup was apparently changed by the [previous owner over the 20 year period of his ownership.


Once I push above 1600 the semi displacement hull is trying too hard to lift itself out of the water at 12 knots. Cheers, Doug
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Old 04-30-2019, 02:42 PM   #27
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Not so

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Almost bought a 1979 Mainship 34 with a turbo charged Perkins 6 cylinder. Deal fell thru, then i just heard to stay away from the turbo Perkins but go with the naturally aspirited. Any thoughts, ides, on normal versus turbo for the engine platform??
Thanks in advance..........frank
Ran 2 6354T for 26 years - unbelieveably reliable-never a turbo prob! Kept oil and fuel real clean - not much else
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Old 05-01-2019, 01:06 AM   #28
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Over the years we ran the Perkins P6's in agri machinery and the later 6354 and 4236's in both turbo and non turbo versions depending on their usage.
A turbo engine of any manufacturer is not happy running at slow speeds all day every day because they need to run under load and hot enough to be effective.
The secret of long turbo life is using the correct grade of oil for turbo engines and of course normal preventive maintenance.
When starting, don't start at a high throttle setting, as soon as it fires let the engine run at a fast tick-over for a few minutes then you can work it hard all day, when you wish to stop the engine let it idle for at least 5 minutes to allow the engine to cool slowly and relieve the thermal stresses around the turbo/cylinder head.
Just a little TLC and the engine will virtually outlive your use.
I've just sold a 40 year old boat with the original 4236 engine which never had the head off, it injectors and pump overhauled and 1 new water pump, oil pressure still high, starts first time.
I cruised it up the Western Isles of Scotland, around Irelands lakes, rivers and canals, over to England, around European canals and down to Spain and back so it was no harbour hogger. Brilliant engine and never let me down. Thank you Frank Perkins for a great engine.
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:07 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by lady sue View Post
As a Mainship owner, I agree with most of your observations: They are not blue sea trawlers, and the do not like following seas; however, they are excellent at what they were built for: comfort, economy, near shore coastal cruising--I've taken mine from NY harbor to Cape Cod, Miami, and points between. They handle rough water 4-5 foot seas, but depending on whether you are nosing into it or running ahead, you can get a good shoulder workout! I just love burning a gallon and a half diesel for hours on end at nine knots, don't you?
JJF
Autopilot baby!

As to the boat not being a bluewater setup.. My thoughts are that it falls down to the type of owner who buys them. A typical mainship is setup for comfort cruising/dock living.

Going from there the Mainship tends to dislike a following sea and with a full keel she'll rock and roll around. The boat will handle open water crossings just fine but i'm not sure the captain will.

My MK1 has the 160 perkins and they built them all the way up with 240hp. While I enjoy the 7 knot economy I do believe this boat performs better with higher hp as a planing style boat(around 15 knots). If you are able to run around 15 knots the following sea becomes mostly a head sea.

Keep in mind this is the same hull as the 35 henriques maine coaster which has an excellent reputation as a sportfish/downeast boat. The 35 henriques was either single or a twin engine hull with most being twin volvo 165's. Many people have upgraded HP and the most i've seen is a single cummins 425. The keel was slightly modified(shortened slightly) but in effect a mainship 34 below the waterline. Same issues in a following sea but a well regarded "canyon boat" for running ~100 miles offshore.

Here's a 35' Henriques hull showing the difference in the keel.

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