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Old 02-12-2018, 01:54 PM   #21
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Blue Sky has a Lugger (Komatsu block) with just under 12000 hours. When we purchased her five years ago she was just over 10,000 so we gave her a significant service but didn`t go inside. Everything (including oil analysis) indicated that she would go another 10,000 with no problem. She now gets serviced Oil change etc.) annually which is about 120-150 hours.

We don`t know her service history although she spent her formative years in Alaska in charter as Eight Stars, which would presumably explain her relatively high hours.

We are very confident that the Lugger will still be going strong long after we pass her on to the next owner, which won`t be for many years to come.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:29 AM   #22
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I have a 1963 Lister Blackstone with almost 30,000 hours and I'm putting a Lister Petter Alpha in my current project that I expect the same out of. It's maintenance that keeps an engine going, oil, filters, adjustments, hoses, belts and cleanliness before things start to break.
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:25 AM   #23
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As I've said before here, the Deutz last engine I overhauled (back when I was 19) ran for another 50,000 hours pulling an irrigation pump. It can be done. Change the oils and filters regularly, and don't get any electronics to fail... This was a 5 cylinder Deutz FL5912 and the design was very similar to a lycoming engine, with iron cylinder sleeves and a turbine blowing cooling air past an oil cooler and through the fins of each cylinder sleeves.

FLx912 and 913 were similar designs except the 913 had a little higher compression. All have bosch mechanical injection pumps which run forever.

These are the same company and design that built the engines that ran in the German Tiger tank back in WWII.
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Old 04-17-2018, 07:43 AM   #24
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The USCG used to use aircooled Listers on lighted bouys, I've heard accounts of over 100,000 hrs before a rebuild. It is possible with good maintenance and clean fresh fuel.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:34 AM   #25
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As pointed out to me ....

http://www.alanhamby.com/maybach.shtml

The Maybach company, under the technical leadership of Karl Maybach, produced the engines for all the medium and heavy German tanks of WWII.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:50 AM   #26
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There are a million ways for engines to die way before "their time".

Intermittent type of use and marine age is what is killing most diesels prematurely in pleasure boats. The mythical hours gen-sets and commercial users achieve are not realistic in typical pleasure use.

When you shut down a diesel for a long period (say over winter), some valves will be open and moist air will be rusting those cylinders. Upon start up in the spring there is a good chance some of the rings are stuck and will break if there is enough rust in the cylinder.

Seawater cooled after-coolers are another Achilles heel of high performance diesels. Sooner or later a leak will develop and seawater will enter the engine.

Marginal exhaust geometry and inevitable shower head corrosion that leads to sea water leaks into the engine is another killer.

Most planing boats are over-propped and the engines cannot reach WOT RPMs after the owner has added all his "stuff" to the boat. This will significantly shorten engine life.

Pleasure boat horsepower ratings are just that. These engines are run at the ragged edge but at 100-200 hours per year they will typically last 10 years.

So what can we do? Make sure the engines are not overloaded and run high-strung engines at 70% or below, check your aftercoolers and exhaust showerheads on a yearly basis and always use a block heater when not using regularly.
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Old 04-17-2018, 10:22 AM   #27
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Hi,


I hope I have this kind of mysterious diesel my CM qsb, the time seems to be half of it.


NBs
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Old 04-17-2018, 11:38 AM   #28
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As pointed out to me ....

Tiger I Information Center - The Maybach Engine

The Maybach company, under the technical leadership of Karl Maybach, produced the engines for all the medium and heavy German tanks of WWII.
That's odd, since Deutz training classes made a big deal about the Deutz - Tiger tank connection...

Also, the reason I overhauled the engine in the first place is the exhaust stack flapper had stuck open and let water into two of the cylinders. We replaced the two sleeves, honed everything back to factory specs and re-assembled it. That was at 1200 or so hours time. It ran for over 50,000 when the owner contacted my father and requested he overhaul it again... Dad laughed at him and said buy another!

Thanks for the correction!
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Old 04-17-2018, 01:47 PM   #29
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The main factor in long life is the work the engine was designed to do. The 2nd most important factor is how the PO's used them and does the engine have a turbo. There is a huge difference between recreational and commercial engines. Many small engines made for recreational use are just a redesigned gas engine. Most aren't expected to be rebuilt, just replaced. The manufacturers goal, from what I can see, is to make it thru warranty.
Poor maintenance (dirty oil), high exhaust gas temperatures, and running wide open are the engine killers.
Commercial engines are made to be rebuilt. They are bigger and heavier. Things like better materials to withstand greater temperatures and replaceable sleeves so a like factory new bore can be achieved when overhauled.
My Detroit Diesels naturals (actually Gray Marine before the name change) were made in 1947. In contacting the PO's I could document 20,000+ hours to about 1972. In rebuilding myself, numbers on the old sleeves indicated the engines had never been overhauled. PO's had routinely run the engines at 1800 to 2100 rpm. I usually run at 1800, their max hp rating. But because they're heavy duty engines the PO's excessive rpms didn't seem to harm them. You can't do that with a recreational engine. My DDs were one of the main reasons I bought my current boat. They'll probably need overhaul again about 2085, but I won't have to do it.
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:55 PM   #30
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I ran a large fleet (over 200) of Caterpillar 3516 generators in a former job. We ran them very hard, with normal load over 1000 kW.
In most cases, we did top end overhauls @ about 25,000 and bottom end at 50,000 hours. Oil changes were done at 900-1000 hours.

One of the biggest variable affecting the engine life was the number of startups. The engines that ran during peak hours only, and shut down during the night had a much shorter lifespan than those running almost constantly.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:33 PM   #31
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Quote:
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I ran a large fleet (over 200) of Caterpillar 3516 generators in a former job. We ran them very hard, with normal load over 1000 kW.
In most cases, we did top end overhauls @ about 25,000 and bottom end at 50,000 hours. Oil changes were done at 900-1000 hours.

One of the biggest variable affecting the engine life was the number of startups. The engines that ran during peak hours only, and shut down during the night had a much shorter lifespan than those running almost constantly.
1meg is not a lot for a 3516. In a standby application they go up to 2.5 meg. In a prime application they typically are slow speed 1200rpm and much lower kw rating than standby applications.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:48 PM   #32
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I have a pair of Lugger LP668Ts on my boat. It is an unusual set up as the majority of these are installed as singles. It was the main (but close to being the only) reason I bought this boat.
They currently have less than 6K hours, Since I bought the boat I have contracted with Control Masters Inc. to maintain them (along with the Northern Lights gen). CMI have the contract to maintain the St John's River pilot boats, so are a top class outfit.

My expectation for these engines is a very long one, certainly for the next 15 years plus. After that I seen no reason why the power plant would be a negative in any sale.
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Old 04-18-2018, 06:02 AM   #33
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Most of the dead pleasure boat engines I have seen were killed , not worn out.

I understand how folks can fear a 10,000 hour engine , but a far bigger fear should be the engine that has 50 hours a year on the clock.

When I hear of a replacement diesel in a fairly new pleasure boat I always winder how it was killed , and what else is suffering onboard.
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Old 05-02-2018, 11:50 AM   #34
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Great Information

I want to thank everyone who commented on this topic. It’s nice to hear from the people who know and have experienced running a diesel for a long time. I learned a lot and I can’t say every day. I guess I'm a light weight only averaging 100 hrs / year. doing oil changes every 50 hrs. I guess I have to drive harder and drink less Rum.
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