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Old 11-08-2019, 05:31 PM   #121
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First post reply. You don’t have a Mechanic, you have a Hack. Water in the oil does not evaporate or appear from nowhere. Somewhere water is entering the crankcase, find out where. Do not run the engine except for troubleshooting purposes. Take the Mechanic off your Christmas list.
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Old 11-08-2019, 05:48 PM   #122
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:09 PM   #123
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Last time I had that problem ,milky oil that is, It was a car engine with a cracked block...oil and coolant mixed thru the crack internally and showed up in the rad.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:11 PM   #124
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Tangler,

That must have sucked! But, fortunately, in this case, the OP had an oil analysis done and found no glycol in the oil. It was suggested that he check the coolant for oil, and we didn't hear any finding about that, so I suspect it was oil-free. Lucky him!
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:20 PM   #125
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Definitely a mechanical emergency. Don't run the engine till sorted out is how I would handle it.
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Old 11-08-2019, 11:26 PM   #126
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Les,

A lot of sorting out has happened over the life of the thread.

In particular, per oil analysis, the oil is polluted with glycol-free water (not coolant) in a freshwater boat (no salt to also check for in the oil) without an oil cooler (no place where oil and raw water come near each other), and, I think, without any oil in the coolant. Additionally, the boat has a recent history of extended cranking (an opportunity for the raw water pump to push water into the oil), and of cruising without the generator running in a model of vessel reported to have problems with water backing up the generator exhaust while cruising, but is equipped with an exhaust flap for whatever such is worth.

So, the problem has nothing to do with the coolant or coolant loop, and there is no apparent way for the water to have gotten into the system via the raw water loop, but there are a couple of high probability ways by which it could have gotten into the system via transient conditions.
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:29 AM   #127
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If you over cranked the engine enough to back water into the engine from the exhaust, you would most likely have hydrolocked the engine and the engine would not crank. It takes very little water coming in an open exhaust valve to hydrolock that cylinder. I think that is a very unlikely way to get water into the oil.
When I read to OP’s post, I had the same thought. An overfilled water lift muffler backing water up into cylinders would cause hydrolocking. Also, there’s next to no way the water could seep past the rings unless they were terribly worn. I think you should be looking for another cause for the water in oil.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:25 AM   #128
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First post reply. You don’t have a Mechanic, you have a Hack. Water in the oil does not evaporate or appear from nowhere. Somewhere water is entering the crankcase, find out where. Do not run the engine except for troubleshooting purposes. Take the Mechanic off your Christmas list.
A fundamental truth, Blimpdriver. Thanks.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:29 AM   #129
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Tangler,

That must have sucked! But, fortunately, in this case, the OP had an oil analysis done and found no glycol in the oil. It was suggested that he check the coolant for oil, and we didn't hear any finding about that, so I suspect it was oil-free. Lucky him!
Haven't had the opportunity to do anything further, including testing the coolant. Nor has the marina been able to continue with the task. Hopefully, I'll get up there before Christmas to kick some ass.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:33 AM   #130
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Definitely a mechanical emergency. Don't run the engine till sorted out is how I would handle it.
After reviewing all this advice, I'd planned to have the new oil checked again for milkiness, and if still impure, changed again with a new filter. But shouldn't the engine be run to normal operating temperature between changes? I also plan to peruse the generator exhaust system to determine from where the water leaked into the engine.
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Old 11-09-2019, 11:59 AM   #131
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Les,

A lot of sorting out has happened over the life of the thread.

In particular, per oil analysis, the oil is polluted with glycol-free water (not coolant) in a freshwater boat (no salt to also check for in the oil) without an oil cooler (no place where oil and raw water come near each other), and, I think, without any oil in the coolant. Additionally, the boat has a recent history of extended cranking (an opportunity for the raw water pump to push water into the oil), and of cruising without the generator running in a model of vessel reported to have problems with water backing up the generator exhaust while cruising, but is equipped with an exhaust flap for whatever such is worth.

So, the problem has nothing to do with the coolant or coolant loop, and there is no apparent way for the water to have gotten into the system via the raw water loop, but there are a couple of high probability ways by which it could have gotten into the system via transient conditions.
What do you mean by transient conditions? Following sea, etc? After reviewing all the great, though varied advice provided herein, for which I am most grateful, I've been pondering this situation further.


The previous owner took meticulous care of his vessel, employing the same mechanic since the boat was new. I actually met the mechanic and he seemed to know his business. (Sometimes I regret leaving that marina.)


The pre-purchase surveyor started the generator and reported normal operation at the time. And since my wife was not keen on anchoring or mooring away from a marina, the genny had virtually no use. I did try to start it once this past summer while visiting a national park. But apparently due to a weak dedicated battery, it failed to start. That's when I may have cranked it too much.



However, upon our return to our home marina and shorepower, it started readily. I ran it for only a few minutes. And with no further use, about a month or so later, the "mechanic" and I found the oil cafe. To my knowledge, he changed it only once. And as I said, the service manager recommended I change the oil and filter again upon launch and run it for a couple of hours. But I feel the need to check the oil again now and try to get the remaining water, if any, out of the engine immediately.



I must admit that I had no idea that the generator had its own exhaust port, except, of course, that for water egress. I assumed it is tied into the main exhaust. But it appears that, according to my understanding of comments offered herein, it has a dedicated exhaust. Is this correct? When I referred to flaps, I meant on the two mains on the transom. Can anyone tell me where the genny exhaust port is located? I've not seen any other ports with flaps anywhere. Could it be on the transom under the swim platform? If it's there, it's no wonder that water finds its way into the generator.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:09 PM   #132
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Hey Ross,

The water and exhaust gases typically exhaust through the same thru hull or exhaust pipe. If you've,found where the water comes out, you've found where the gas comes out.

You probably want to run the generator sooner than later, so the watery oil on the internal metal parts gets circulated and diluted. Then change again. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. Then, oil sample again to get confirmation all is good.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:11 PM   #133
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Hi Ross,

Also, my current boat has it via an exhaust pipe on the transom under swim step. My last boat had it out the starboard side via a thru-hull with sea cock. In each case above the water line, the old boat more so than the new.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:28 PM   #134
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Hi Ross,

Also, my current boat has it via an exhaust pipe on the transom under swim step. My last boat had it out the starboard side via a thru-hull with sea cock. In each case above the water line, the old boat more so than the new.
Yes, I recall seeing the water/exhaust port somewhere; I believe it was aft on one of the sides. That's good to know since the mains exhaust with flaps below the water line on the transom. I'll just have to make sure all water is removed and new oil and filter added until an oil test reports water-free. It'll obviously be more trouble since my boat is inside heated storage. But it will have to be done. All I need is the marina's cooperation .... and a power cable along with long hoses for water and exhaust gas. Thanks for all your help, my friend.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:31 PM   #135
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After reviewing all this advice, I'd planned to have the new oil checked again for milkiness, and if still impure, changed again with a new filter. But shouldn't the engine be run to normal operating temperature between changes? I also plan to peruse the generator exhaust system to determine from where the water leaked into the engine.
I don't know how much oil it takes, but I would try not to run it at all. That oil water emulsion is not good for rod or crank bearings or Turbo bearings depending on how your Turbo get's oiled(it it has one). You're most likely gonna have some of that oil turn into steam in the crankcase. Get some good samples and take a look at them. Maybe sample some from the lowest part of the crankcase. Let some stand for a while in a warm environment. Picture would be good unless I missed it.

I would drain the oil cold. Then fill it and determine whether you want to start it.

Do you have a low drain plug or is it pumped out? Or maybe pumped out but you also have a low drain plug?

Would be nice if you could get a borescope and look at the top of the pistons and observe for steam cleaning.

My experience with this is on cars is with blown head gaskets. You get water in the oil, sometimes oil in the coolant, and steam out the exhaust. The water fairly quickly ruins the heads.

You need to find someone familiar with your setup who IS a competent marine/diesel wrench. Your original guy I would have little confidence in after he didn't know why the oil looked that way.
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Old 11-09-2019, 12:37 PM   #136
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I don't know how much oil it takes, but I would try not to run it at all. That oil water emulsion is not good for rod or crank bearings or Turbo bearings depending on how your Turbo get's oiled(it it has one). You're most likely gonna have some of that oil turn into steam in the crankcase. Get some good samples and take a look at them. Maybe sample some from the lowest part of the crankcase. Let some stand for a while in a warm environment. Picture would be good unless I missed it.

I would drain the oil cold. Then fill it and determine whether you want to start it.

Do you have a low drain plug or is it pumped out? Or maybe pumped out but you also have a low drain plug?

Would be nice if you could get a borescope and look at the top of the pistons and observe for steam cleaning.

My experience with this is on cars is with blown head gaskets. You get water in the oil, sometimes oil in the coolant, and steam out the exhaust. The water fairly quickly ruins the heads.

You need to find someone familiar with your setup who IS a competent marine/diesel wrench. Your original guy I would have little confidence in after he didn't know why the oil looked that way.
I don't know if there's a low drain, Les. The genny is encapsulated within a sound shield box and is not easily accessible. The oil is pumped out with a built-in oil exchange pump system, which also serves the 2 mains.
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Old 11-09-2019, 10:52 PM   #137
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Winter is coming at a fast pace, don't wait too long if you want to check/change your oil

L
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:08 AM   #138
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Winter is coming at a fast pace, don't wait too long if you want to check/change your oil

L
Thanks, Lou. Maybe I've presumed incorrectly that, since my boat is in heated storage, there's no urgency, that there's no deed to rush up there today to change the oil again. I intend to go this month. I guess the longer any water remains in the oil, the greater the potential for corrosion to engine parts?
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:30 AM   #139
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Assume that most of the engine is steel, iron castings, or aluminum.
The longer the steel parts sit in the oily water bath, the more damage it suffers.
Most of the iron parts (except cylinder walls) won't care much.
Aluminum won't suffer much either.
Come springtime, you're probably going to have to do something about the rusty steel parts.

Is there a chance that a crankcase vent could have inhaled water somehow? Assuming a vent went down low enough to pull it into the crankcase, that could be a source.
Since it has no glycol, you've eliminated the cooling water/anti-freeze loop (unless someone had pure water instead of antifreeze/water solution.
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Old 11-10-2019, 11:37 AM   #140
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Assume that most of the engine is steel, iron castings, or aluminum.
The longer the steel parts sit in the oily water bath, the more damage it suffers.
Most of the iron parts (except cylinder walls) won't care much.
Aluminum won't suffer much either.
Come springtime, you're probably going to have to do something about the rusty steel parts.

Is there a chance that a crankcase vent could have inhaled water somehow? Assuming a vent went down low enough to pull it into the crankcase, that could be a source.
Since it has no glycol, you've eliminated the cooling water/anti-freeze loop (unless someone had pure water instead of antifreeze/water solution.
That makes sense, Stubones99. Steel is steel.


Though I'm no mechanic, since the generator is mounted quite high in the ER, I can't see how water could have leaked into it through any vent. My ER is pretty high and dry.
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