Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-06-2019, 09:29 PM   #101
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, FL near Panama City
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,315
With my boat in a fixed orientation in its wet slip, I have simply plugged the exhaust port with a rubber plug until I can get it out of the water again on its repaired lift. I never would worry about it at anchor where the waves would not be consistently hitting it broadside as they can do now.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2019, 09:30 PM   #102
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by danderer View Post
This is the vented loop on my boat. Note it is as high as it can go in the ER. When Mainship built the boats they placed them about 10" lower.

There was also no rise between the muffler and the overboard discharge. My new configuration has some rise there as well.

This exhaust system for the generator is completely separate from the one for the main engine. The main engine shouldn't have this problem - the muffler on that engine has a 'overflow' port on it that leads overboard. If the water gets too high in that muffler it drains through that port.
This should be easy to find and rectify. It's comforting to know that the genny has a dedicated muffler system. At least the mains won't be affected. Now I can't wait to get back into my ER. Thanks, Sojourner.
__________________

__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2019, 09:31 PM   #103
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
With my boat in a fixed orientation in its wet slip, I have simply plugged the exhaust port with a rubber plug until I can get it out of the water again on its repaired lift. I never would worry about it at anchor where the waves would not be consistently hitting it broadside as they can do now.
Good to know, Rich. Thanks.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2019, 09:50 PM   #104
Guru
 
City: Clearwater, Florida USA
Vessel Name: Seas the Bay
Vessel Model: 1981 42' Hardin Europa
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,479
Hey Ross,

Cranking for a couple of minutes can be plenty long enough to get raw water into the engine. You may have actually gotten lucky that nothing had a bad day as a result (and the same is true if it came in via the exhaust).

In the future, if you ever find yourself needing to crank for a while, even across multiple bursts, close the intake seacock first, then open it immediately as soon as the engine starts. And, of course, be careful about over heating the starter. They can handle tons of current in short bursts -- but need time to cool off in between or they'll burn up.

People seem to have very different experience with the flaps. You'll have to think through your configuration from exhaust discharge back to the genset and mentally estimate how likely it is that water pushed its way past them and up into the exhaust given the seas and how the boat was operated.

Given that flaps are there, and the history of extended cranking, I'm betting on it being the extended cranking. But, it doesn't really matter. Do what you can to raise the exhaust, if you can. It'll be safer that way. And, you already have flaps, for whatever they are worth. Beyond that, I'd suggest using safest practices, such as running the generator any time you are cruising and closing the seacock (and letting the starter cool) during extended cranking. (Note: I avoided using the phrase "best practices", because I know others feel differently about the need to run a genset while cruising. But, I suspect we can all agree, at the least, it is the most conservative practice.)

If you find the model of that generator, I can google it for you and see if I can find a parts or service manual. If, like mine, it has no oil cooler -- that would scratch that off the list and basically strongly point to it being from the exhaust or raw water pump.

Cheers!
-Greg
gkesden is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 06:31 AM   #105
Technical Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 6,183
Do not worry too much at this point how the water got in. Focus on getting the water out of the oil for storage.

There is no oil cooler on these to leak, and the head gaskets are reliable. And the sample did not indicate glycol. So it is likely an issue with siphon break and/or exhaust issue. None will be a problem in runs needed to dry out the engine.

Raw water pump is belt drive, so that is off the list too.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 01:04 PM   #106
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by gkesden View Post
Hey Ross,

Cranking for a couple of minutes can be plenty long enough to get raw water into the engine. You may have actually gotten lucky that nothing had a bad day as a result (and the same is true if it came in via the exhaust).

In the future, if you ever find yourself needing to crank for a while, even across multiple bursts, close the intake seacock first, then open it immediately as soon as the engine starts. And, of course, be careful about over heating the starter. They can handle tons of current in short bursts -- but need time to cool off in between or they'll burn up.

People seem to have very different experience with the flaps. You'll have to think through your configuration from exhaust discharge back to the genset and mentally estimate how likely it is that water pushed its way past them and up into the exhaust given the seas and how the boat was operated.

Given that flaps are there, and the history of extended cranking, I'm betting on it being the extended cranking. But, it doesn't really matter. Do what you can to raise the exhaust, if you can. It'll be safer that way. And, you already have flaps, for whatever they are worth. Beyond that, I'd suggest using safest practices, such as running the generator any time you are cruising and closing the seacock (and letting the starter cool) during extended cranking. (Note: I avoided using the phrase "best practices", because I know others feel differently about the need to run a genset while cruising. But, I suspect we can all agree, at the least, it is the most conservative practice.)

If you find the model of that generator, I can google it for you and see if I can find a parts or service manual. If, like mine, it has no oil cooler -- that would scratch that off the list and basically strongly point to it being from the exhaust or raw water pump.

Cheers!
-Greg
Thanks again, Greg. I've learned a lot in this string. Now that I'm better equipped to actually see what's happening in my ER, I plan a trip up to the boat very soon to have a closer look at things.


While I'm waiting for the marina mechanic to drop by, the first thing I'll do is check the genny oil again. While I'm there, I'll also look at the exhaust configuration with new eyes.


According to Ski, the raw water pump is belt-driven, thus would not be responsible for water in the oil. And that leaves the exhaust system, combined with over-cranking, as the culprit.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 01:09 PM   #107
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Do not worry too much at this point how the water got in. Focus on getting the water out of the oil for storage.

There is no oil cooler on these to leak, and the head gaskets are reliable. And the sample did not indicate glycol. So it is likely an issue with siphon break and/or exhaust issue. None will be a problem in runs needed to dry out the engine.

Raw water pump is belt drive, so that is off the list too.
Thanks, Ski. But what do you mean by "siphon break"? And when you say "none will be a problem in runs needed to dry out the engine", do you mean that, aside from replacing the tainted oil and filter, simply running the engine for awhile will dry it out? The rest of your news is great!
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 02:59 PM   #108
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,279
One advice when checkin the oil, check also the level for anormal high level. Water separate from oil and oil float on water. If oil is clean but higher than last time you check that may be oil floating on a layer of water...
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 03:15 PM   #109
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou_tribal View Post
One advice when checkin the oil, check also the level for anormal high level. Water separate from oil and oil float on water. If oil is clean but higher than last time you check that may be oil floating on a layer of water...
Good point, Lou. Thanks.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 03:38 PM   #110
Guru
 
City: Clearwater, Florida USA
Vessel Name: Seas the Bay
Vessel Model: 1981 42' Hardin Europa
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,479
Hey Ross,

Ever siphoned water from an aquarium into a bucket? Or from a vehicles fuel tank into a portable tank?

Basically, imagine a situation where the are two buckets "High" and "Low". If directly connected, such as via a drain hose, "High" will naturally drain by gravity to "Low". As gravity pulls water from "High" down into "Low", air is easily displaced into the high bucket and out of the low bucket to conserve volume. Easy peasy. We see this all the time.

Now imagine exactly the same buckets, and exactly the same gravity, except that, instead of the drain connecting directly from the bottom of the "High" bucket, it is a hose that reaches the bottom of the bucket before going above the bucket and then looping down into the "Low" bucket.

The water in the "High" bucket still has more potential energy than the water in the ow bucket. Gravity still wants to pull it down. But, it doesn't have a source of energy to get pulled up the hose farther so that gravity can take it from there. So, the water stays in the high bucket.

Now, imagine that we use suction to fill the hose with water, pulling it from "High", into the hose, filling the hose. Now two things happen. The first is that the "pulling" of the water from "High" into "low" generates a low pressure area in "High", which in turn pulls water into the hose. Essentially, atmospheric pressure is now pushing water up over the hump, so gravity can pull it down. Also imagine that, like links of a chain, the water molecules are attached to each other, admittedly quite weakly, because they are dipole molecules and the polar bonding causes cohesion. Now we have a situation where a combination of atmospheric pressure and the tug of one molecule of draining water upon the next one in line keeps water flowing from "High" to "Low". The combination of these two forces causes the siphon effect that we know an love -- given enough height difference, enough initial suction, a compatible hose volume, little enough friction, etc, etc, etc once the water starts moving from "High" to "Low", it'll keep flowing.

So, how do we stop this from happening One thing we can do is put a valve at the high point of the hose that, in the event of negative relative pressure (suction), opens up and lets air into the hose. This air is sucked in at or near the top. So, as the water is pulled down, it is air, not more water, that displaces it. Now the hose fills with air as the water falls rather than pulling more water by suction or cohesion, so the "siphon is broken".

How can suction pull water into an exhaust? One way is that it can mechanically get started and then just keep on going. Another way is that as an engine is cooling, the gases cool off and take up less space. And, this generates suction. Add mechanical events and suction from cooling and water can get where you don't want it. A siphon break helps with both.

You don't really want it below the water line, or it, itself, can be a leak water from the outside in. The flapper isn't intended as a seacock. So, for best performance and safety, you normally want them at the apex of the loop decidedly above the water line in any condition. Too high and it becomes an impediment to legitimate water travel (pump head to get started, friction, etc).

As for belt driven raw water pumps being unable to fill an engine with water -- I do not believe that is generally true. The turning of the impeller moves water. It doesn't really matter if this impeller is turned by the auxiliary (accessory) gear or by the auxiliary (accessory) belt. In most engines, the gear or belt turns any time the engine does. This includes it getting turned by a ratchet ("barred over"), getting turned by the starter, or getting turned by normal operation. The alternative would require something like a clutch to disengage the auxiliary driver or belt until the engine is started -- and that just isn't common on recreational vessel mains and generators.

Having said that, I still don't know which generator you have. And Ski seems to know that it has no oil cooler and a belt-driven raw water pump. So, he may know a heck of a lot more than me about your generator, in particular. And, it is definitely true that different generators are at different levels of risk of this type of thing. So, if he knows yours, he may know that.

What ski meant by "none will be a problem in runs needed to dry out the engine" is that whatever initial conditions (long start or exhaust backup while not running) caused you to get the water in the oil originally won't be the case during a test run in which the engine starts up and the generator is running.

What he is suggesting is that since there is no oil cooler or anything else to fix, the best thing you can do is get it flushed out really good by running it. And, to do that, you don't need to do any more research. Just do it sooner than later to prevent corrosion.
gkesden is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 04:12 PM   #111
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by gkesden View Post
Hey Ross,

Ever siphoned water from an aquarium into a bucket? Or from a vehicles fuel tank into a portable tank?

Basically, imagine a situation where the are two buckets "High" and "Low". If directly connected, such as via a drain hose, "High" will naturally drain by gravity to "Low". As gravity pulls water from "High" down into "Low", air is easily displaced into the high bucket and out of the low bucket to conserve volume. Easy peasy. We see this all the time.

Now imagine exactly the same buckets, and exactly the same gravity, except that, instead of the drain connecting directly from the bottom of the "High" bucket, it is a hose that reaches the bottom of the bucket before going above the bucket and then looping down into the "Low" bucket.

The water in the "High" bucket still has more potential energy than the water in the ow bucket. Gravity still wants to pull it down. But, it doesn't have a source of energy to get pulled up the hose farther so that gravity can take it from there. So, the water stays in the high bucket.

Now, imagine that we use suction to fill the hose with water, pulling it from "High", into the hose, filling the hose. Now two things happen. The first is that the "pulling" of the water from "High" into "low" generates a low pressure area in "High", which in turn pulls water into the hose. Essentially, atmospheric pressure is now pushing water up over the hump, so gravity can pull it down. Also imagine that, like links of a chain, the water molecules are attached to each other, admittedly quite weakly, because they are dipole molecules and the polar bonding causes cohesion. Now we have a situation where a combination of atmospheric pressure and the tug of one molecule of draining water upon the next one in line keeps water flowing from "High" to "Low". The combination of these two forces causes the siphon effect that we know an love -- given enough height difference, enough initial suction, a compatible hose volume, little enough friction, etc, etc, etc once the water starts moving from "High" to "Low", it'll keep flowing.

So, how do we stop this from happening One thing we can do is put a valve at the high point of the hose that, in the event of negative relative pressure (suction), opens up and lets air into the hose. This air is sucked in at or near the top. So, as the water is pulled down, it is air, not more water, that displaces it. Now the hose fills with air as the water falls rather than pulling more water by suction or cohesion, so the "siphon is broken".

How can suction pull water into an exhaust? One way is that it can mechanically get started and then just keep on going. Another way is that as an engine is cooling, the gases cool off and take up less space. And, this generates suction. Add mechanical events and suction from cooling and water can get where you don't want it. A siphon break helps with both.

You don't really want it below the water line, or it, itself, can be a leak water from the outside in. The flapper isn't intended as a seacock. So, for best performance and safety, you normally want them at the apex of the loop decidedly above the water line in any condition. Too high and it becomes an impediment to legitimate water travel (pump head to get started, friction, etc).

As for belt driven raw water pumps being unable to fill an engine with water -- I do not believe that is generally true. The turning of the impeller moves water. It doesn't really matter if this impeller is turned by the auxiliary (accessory) gear or by the auxiliary (accessory) belt. In most engines, the gear or belt turns any time the engine does. This includes it getting turned by a ratchet ("barred over"), getting turned by the starter, or getting turned by normal operation. The alternative would require something like a clutch to disengage the auxiliary driver or belt until the engine is started -- and that just isn't common on recreational vessel mains and generators.

Having said that, I still don't know which generator you have. And Ski seems to know that it has no oil cooler and a belt-driven raw water pump. So, he may know a heck of a lot more than me about your generator, in particular. And, it is definitely true that different generators are at different levels of risk of this type of thing. So, if he knows yours, he may know that.

What ski meant by "none will be a problem in runs needed to dry out the engine" is that whatever initial conditions (long start or exhaust backup while not running) caused you to get the water in the oil originally won't be the case during a test run in which the engine starts up and the generator is running.

What he is suggesting is that since there is no oil cooler or anything else to fix, the best thing you can do is get it flushed out really good by running it. And, to do that, you don't need to do any more research. Just do it sooner than later to prevent corrosion.
Wow - you must be a physics teacher, Greg! That was the absolute best explanation of siphoning I've ever seen. My grand kids could follow that. :-)



I understand the fundamentals, of course, since I've had personal experience with the process. Many years ago, when, to paraphrase Billy Joel, I wore a younger man's clothes, I had the occasion to siphon gasoline from one fuel tank to another - with my mouth creating the suction to get it flowing.


If a siphon break were to be installed at the apex of the exhaust loop of either the main or genny exhaust, I presume that would also allow exhaust out into the ER. Correct? So, is there a special attachment that would permit a one-way passage of air to prevent a suction building and drawing in water? Or have I misunderstood you?


I'll get the generator running soon, after I've re-checked the oil and replaced again with the filter if necessary. I conclude that you're suggesting a test run of maybe an hour or so should burn off any residual water. Thanks, Greg.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 04:32 PM   #112
Guru
 
City: Clearwater, Florida USA
Vessel Name: Seas the Bay
Vessel Model: 1981 42' Hardin Europa
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,479
Hey Ross,

The siphon break on the raw water side, if there is one, is just raw water. So, it can't let exhaust in.

The siphon break on the exhaust side, which is the one we've been discussing, is, I guess, an interesting question.

Under normal circumstances, positive pressure from water flowing through normally would keep the valve closed. So, exhaust gases couldn't leak out the valve for two reasons: (i) pressurized water is in the space, excluding the gas, and (ii) the pressure is keeping the valve closed.

In the "siphon break" condition, gas is flowing the opposite way -- getting sucked into the valve. So, exhaust gas won't get in.

But, what if the flapper simply broke? Under normal situations, the water would still exclude the exhaust gas -- and leak out.

But, if there were a situation where the flapper broke, and the water pressure dropped off, then exhaust gas could theoretically leak out of one of these. Add some obstruction, like flappers or a partially underwater exhaust and this would seem to become more likely.

But, well, I doubt that condition would last long. Without raw water, the engine should shut down due to high temperature. And, if not, the bilge alarms should start going off -- because the raw water is likely landing in the bilge!

I guess what I'm saying is that I've never seen this condition occur (But, I have seen dripping leaks from the vented loops). But, I think it could theoretically occur under the right set of circumstances. And, well, someone has probably landed there. Sucks for them.

Having said that, because of the size of the leak, and the other things that would likely limit it by shutting down the generator or causing a human to do so, it doesn't strike me as being a threat to the human occupants. Blow-by is probably worse. But, I'm just guessing there.

You really do want a vented loop on the exhaust side, even if there is some theoretical risk of it leaking exhaust gas. Any of the fittings on the exhaust side or manifold, etc, can do that.
gkesden is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2019, 06:04 PM   #113
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,623
Quick question and no, I haven't looked at my Cummin's 380.
No longer is there a drain plug in the pan?
If there is, once you most of the water and oil mixture by pumping, pull the drain plug to finish the draining.

Someone mentioned flushing with diesel fuel.... I have done that with an old jeep engine, to get the sludge out.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 02:06 PM   #114
Veteran Member
 
City: East Falmouth, MA
Vessel Name: GLORY DAYS
Vessel Model: 2007 MAINSHIP PILOT 43
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 53
Any mechanic should know milky oil is caused by water emulsified in the oil. In the very least, drain all the oil out even if you have to leave it empty over the winter. If you can run it then put in fresh oil and filter, start it briefly then check to make sure it is clear. In the spring I would run it and change the oil and filter again.
JoeApicella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 02:28 PM   #115
Veteran Member
 
City: Friday Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 31 TE 2004
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 53
All advice has been spot on ... that oil should come out. I was in a similar situation with a gas V8 in a jet boat that nearly sunk. I am sure that motor had a water load much greater than yours. After several oil changes still showing water contamination, I drained the motor, changed the filter, and filled it with kerosene to the top. It was some time before I could drain the and kerosene replace the oil/filter. No apparent harm was sustained through this unfortunate episode. As a back up plan, if you cant run your engine while it is in storage you could pickle it with any light oil, diesel, or kerosene. It will just take another couple of oil changes to clear that out in the spring. With all of the preceding sage advice, you probably know more than your mechanic ... Im sure you are smarter.
Mark Laurnen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 04:09 PM   #116
Veteran Member
 
City: Friday Harbor, WA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 31 TE 2004
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 53
One thing to consider however, it was easy to drain the cylinders by removing the spark plugs ... probably not so easy with a diesel motor.
Mark Laurnen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 04:23 PM   #117
Veteran Member
 
City: Port Saint Lucie
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by RossWilson View Post
Hello Everyone:
When the marina mechanic was changing the oil and filter on my diesel generator recently, he found that the oil was the colour of cafe au lait, that is to say, coffee with cream.


He offered no immediate opinion as to the cause, but advised an oil test. I agreed and he continued with the service. A couple of weeks later, after the boat had been hauled and stored in a heated building for the winter, I received a message from the service manager stating that the milkiness was the result of water in the oil. (BTW - my boat is a fresh-water vessel.)



He suggested that the water probably entered as a result of cranking the genny without starting it. I had been having difficulty starting it a month or so earlier due to a weak battery and never got it started before hauling. He recommended that I start the generator after launch next spring and let it run for an hour or so, and that should resolve the water issue.



Now after another month, I'm wondering if that was good advice. It seems to me that changing the oil once probably won't remove all traces of the water. And leaving it in the genny all winter couldn't be good for the engine. If this is true, what should I do? Any other options? Should I change the oil and filter again before running it in the spring? Should I insist that the oil be changed again now even though the boat is on-the-hard? Thanks.
I don't know who you been talking to, but one thing is for sure, he ain't no mechanic...
Les_Garten is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 04:25 PM   #118
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeApicella View Post
Any mechanic should know milky oil is caused by water emulsified in the oil. In the very least, drain all the oil out even if you have to leave it empty over the winter. If you can run it then put in fresh oil and filter, start it briefly then check to make sure it is clear. In the spring I would run it and change the oil and filter again.
Thanks, Joe. Good advice.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 04:27 PM   #119
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Laurnen View Post
All advice has been spot on ... that oil should come out. I was in a similar situation with a gas V8 in a jet boat that nearly sunk. I am sure that motor had a water load much greater than yours. After several oil changes still showing water contamination, I drained the motor, changed the filter, and filled it with kerosene to the top. It was some time before I could drain the and kerosene replace the oil/filter. No apparent harm was sustained through this unfortunate episode. As a back up plan, if you cant run your engine while it is in storage you could pickle it with any light oil, diesel, or kerosene. It will just take another couple of oil changes to clear that out in the spring. With all of the preceding sage advice, you probably know more than your mechanic ... Im sure you are smarter.
Thanks, Mark. I hope so. Definitely a little wiser after all the help offered through this terrific forum. Now I just have to put it all into practice.
__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2019, 04:28 PM   #120
Senior Member
 
RossWilson's Avatar
 
City: Oakville
Vessel Name: Good Vibrations
Vessel Model: Mainship 34T
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 237
Quote:
Originally Posted by Les_Garten View Post
I don't know who you been talking to, but one thing is for sure, he ain't no mechanic...
You're probably right, Les. Most of you guys seem to be far wiser than my so-called marine technician.
__________________

__________________
Ross Wilson
Freelance Writer/Author
RossWilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
milky oil

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×