Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-02-2021, 08:05 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Gas vent pipe or check valve?

I have a rebuilt engine ready to run. One problem... I get no fuel from my fuel tank. I added 15 gallons to it, and I'm at the tank discharge hose, to the fuel filter. No gas comes out. I blow back through the hose with compressed air, and I can hear it bubbling in the tank. I do not know where the vent or check valve is. Does anyone here know or have some ideas. 1990 Cooper Prowler 10 meter.
__________________
Advertisement

CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 08:26 PM   #2
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,837
A lot of them have a check valve in the fitting on the top of the tank where the fuel hose attaches. It can be inside the 90 degree fitting.
__________________

__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 10:20 PM   #3
Guru
 
kapnd's Avatar
 
City: hawaii
Vessel Name: #31
Vessel Model: ex-Navy MUB 50 fish/cruise
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 708
The check valve prevents backflow into the tank, and, properly installed/oriented/operating, will not inhibit flow OUT of the tank.
If you can blow air from the motor side into the tank, the check valve doesn’t work, or more likely, there’s not one there.
__________________
You can lead a horse to water,
But you can't make him ski...
kapnd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 10:47 PM   #4
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
A lot of them have a check valve in the fitting on the top of the tank where the fuel hose attaches. It can be inside the 90 degree fitting.


The fitting at the tank/fill hose is pretty tough to get at, but in the morning, I will look into it. Thank you.
CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 10:54 PM   #5
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapnd View Post
The check valve prevents backflow into the tank, and, properly installed/oriented/operating, will not inhibit flow OUT of the tank.
If you can blow air from the motor side into the tank, the check valve doesn’t work, or more likely, there’s not one there.


If you don't mind me asking...
What do you think is keeping my 15 gallons of gas from flowing out of the tank into my engine fuel filters?
CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 11:07 PM   #6
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,837
The check valve is more properly called an anti siphon valve. Without suction on the hose the valve should be closed to prevent a siphon in case of the fuel hose becoming disconnected. The valve is usually builtin the fitting on the top of the tank and doesn’t generally show up until you take the fitting off. It is usually very small.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2021, 11:58 PM   #7
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 2,337
Gasoline tanks usually have an anti-siphon device or a tiny hole near the top of the pickup tube. The fuel pump overcomes the small amount of air the hole allows in. When the pump is off the hole allows the gas in the tube to drain back into the tank, not in the bilge in the case of a leak.

One possibility for no fuel is a rusted off pickup tube. Or more rust holes in the tube than the pump can overcome.
Lepke is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2021, 05:36 PM   #8
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
Gasoline tanks usually have an anti-siphon device or a tiny hole near the top of the pickup tube. The fuel pump overcomes the small amount of air the hole allows in. When the pump is off the hole allows the gas in the tube to drain back into the tank, not in the bilge in the case of a leak.

One possibility for no fuel is a rusted off pickup tube. Or more rust holes in the tube than the pump can overcome.


I think I got it figured out. Bad check valve.


Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4059.jpg
Views:	11
Size:	72.3 KB
ID:	117682
CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2021, 05:38 PM   #9
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by CooperBrewer View Post
I have a rebuilt engine ready to run. One problem... I get no fuel from my fuel tank. I added 15 gallons to it, and I'm at the tank discharge hose, to the fuel filter. No gas comes out. I blow back through the hose with compressed air, and I can hear it bubbling in the tank. I do not know where the vent or check valve is. Does anyone here know or have some ideas. 1990 Cooper Prowler 10 meter.


Thank you everyone. You got me to looking. I think we got it solved

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4081.JPG
Views:	12
Size:	138.5 KB
ID:	117683
CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2021, 06:35 AM   #10
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 21,959
Many fuel tanks have a pickup connection on the top of the tank and a stand pipe to pick up the fuel from above the tank bottom.The fuel is sucked out by the engine ,siphon action keeps the fuel flowing , if there is no air leak.

Fuel will not flow out of the tank unless the siphon action is started.

The usual check valve hopes to block air from entering the system , while the engine is not running or filters are being serviced.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2021, 11:52 AM   #11
Veteran Member
 
CooperBrewer's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Name: Hiatus
Vessel Model: Cooper Prowler
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapnd View Post
The check valve prevents backflow into the tank, and, properly installed/oriented/operating, will not inhibit flow OUT of the tank.
If you can blow air from the motor side into the tank, the check valve doesn’t work, or more likely, there’s not one there.


Yes, this is what I found... the check valve was trash.
__________________

CooperBrewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×