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Old 10-10-2017, 10:22 AM   #21
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Unless the goal is minimize wear or lube oil use at any cost, I don't see advantage over manufacturer recommended oil change intervals unless its prolonging overhaul for some internal failure.
FWIW, my main engine at 250 hours is still clear and darkened. Oil analysis is good. My old gen was fully opaque black at 25 hours and looked the same 200 hours later.
A generator on a boat we chartered, the oil resembled black mud clinging to the dipstick in clumps. The checkout capt said it was still ok.
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Old 10-10-2017, 10:49 AM   #22
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If I was running a commercial engine for many hundreds or thousands of hours per year, I would consider adding secondary lube filtration such as a centrifuge or bypass filter. Along with oil sampling to go as long as possible on an oil change. For economic reasons.

For pleasure boats running low hours, just change the oil on schedule. Most of our oil changes are around a hundred bucks per engine.

If yours came with a secondary filter, great, maintain it and motor on. Some engines did come from the factory that way such as the Cummins 450, some Volvos, some Yanmars, some others.

If it did not come from the factory that way, I would not add it unless in super high hour usage. It needs to be properly engineered in all aspects.
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Old 10-10-2017, 10:55 AM   #23
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This is a little off topic, but it does refer to oil cleanliness. Many years ago when I was much younger, I was employed by an International Industrial Hydraulic company. When a customer would request a system for their plant, a bypass filter system was always recommended. These systems consisted of an external pump and filter unit that would take fluid from the tank run it through the filter and back into the tank. I have seen hydraulic systems that have run for decades with only nominal wear to the main pump and valves. Most of these systems were installed in much dirtier environments than we see on our boats. I myself know that this type of a bypass system is a good thing.
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Old 10-10-2017, 11:23 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
CaptSteve53,
So the carbon is in the soot. This means the old time car mechanics that said to change oil when it turns black had a very valid point. I suspect that would pronote much more oil changing than most of us do as diesel lube oil turns black fairly fast on older engines.
Eric,

Yes all correct, how ever most of the more modern engine lubricants contain better additives regarding cleaning actions,saying that: we had a serious issue with our Cat powered(C12's and C18's) large seismic air compressors mounted on the rear deck of the supply vessel it was mounted on, basically had three units destroy them selves just out of warranty, LONG STORY SHORT-and hence my 5 day Noria oil course and subsequent oil analysis we found the oil was full of soot(and clumped carbon) causing the premature wear, caused by sucking in dirty soot laden air from the ships main engines, Solution was to go from the single unit air filter and use a triple air intake filter system, external oil filtration was fitted, and oil changes @ 200 hours, now running around 10'000 hours with no issues,(these are large compressors @800 CFM running 3000 psi so the engines work real hard! @ 24 hours a day for weeks at a time)

Cheers Steve
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Old 10-13-2017, 11:50 AM   #25
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Yes, all 4 of my Puradyn filters have a heating element on the inside top cap of each filter housing. This burns off any moisture oil the oil.
It's a really well thought out system and for the money, why not extend the life of your machinery. I would especially add this system to Detriots as their life span is short relative to 4 stroke diesels.
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Old 10-13-2017, 03:51 PM   #26
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I would especially add this system to Detriots as their life span is short relative to 4 stroke diesels.
Maybe the 4 cycle Detroits. The 2 cycles are know for reliability and long live between overhaul unless they have dumb captains.

Soot will clump together making larger particles. Bypass oil filters, because the oil flow is very slow and at low pressure, allows the water to separate and can be found in the bottom of the spin on type or below the cartridge in canister types. Some catch an ounce or more. Most bypass filters I have used catch 2 micron debris and below. Better ones below 1 micron. I know because I have tested my oil over 40 years and many engine types.

In my diesel pu, the oil is still slightly transparent at 5000 miles. Before I went to a centrifuge, the oil in my DDs was transparent. I changed the bypass filter when started going dark.

One issue in diesel engines, if the oil isn't changed often enough, sometimes even if it is, the soot will build in oil passages, slowing flow. In smaller passages like the ones going to the head and turbo, it can restrict the flow enough to ruin bearings, rockers and seals (because heat isn't being drawn away by the oil). This is even more apparent on small, high speed, light duty yacht engines.
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Old 10-15-2017, 07:19 AM   #27
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Truck stuff is robust and usually 1/4 - 1/20 "boat stuff" prices.

Engine Oil Centrifuge For Project 300 - Diesel Power ... - Truck Trend

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Jun 1, 2010 - It could be the end of disposable oil filters with Dieselcraft's engine oil centrifuge filter, and to see just how good it really is we installed it on our ...

Fleet Trucking - Spinner II® Products : High-efficiency lube oil filtration ...

Spinner II® Products : High-efficiency lube oil filtration for heavy-duty diesel engines.

Fast Payback, Continuous Savings. The Spinner II® centrifuge is a high-performance bypass oil cleaner for diesel engines. Used in addition to your full-flow oil ...
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Old 10-15-2017, 08:06 AM   #28
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Yes, all 4 of my Puradyn filters have a heating element on the inside top cap of each filter housing. This burns off any moisture oil the oil. .
Or have an engine designed to maintain oil temperatures above 185F or so.
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Old 10-15-2017, 08:11 AM   #29
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Eric,

Yes all correct, how ever most of the more modern engine lubricants contain better additives regarding cleaning actions,saying that: we had a serious issue with our Cat powered(C12's and C18's) large seismic air compressors mounted on the rear deck of the supply vessel it was mounted on, basically had three units destroy them selves just out of warranty, Cheers Steve
Steve, two questions. Who designed the original compressor layout? Second, what is sulfur PPM in diesel fuel the Cats are using?
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