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Old 08-23-2018, 12:09 PM   #21
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I'm not disagreeing with you at all. However, I would mention that most of those boats have a much bigger rudder than most of ours, and as they are work boats working out of working docks, they also aren't concerned as most of us are about putting a scratch in our shiny gelcoat.
That's for sure true. Working boats have working rub rails...
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Old 08-23-2018, 12:22 PM   #22
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I'm not disagreeing with you at all. However, I would mention that most of those boats have a much bigger rudder than most of ours, and as they are work boats working out of working docks, they also aren't concerned as most of us are about putting a scratch in our shiny gelcoat.
Indeed, on the surface it may appear so. One blustery day I watched a 40+ footer enter the runway with a 20K wind pushing him towards a dead end thinking, "no way!" the face dock was full and only a small opening between two boats on the pier. That captain swung it in there like butter, never hit the dock, stepped out with a mug of hot coffee in one hand, threw his lines to secure with the other and ambled off the dock. Single handed. No three point turn, just smooth as silk. That is pure skill. Love watching them.
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Old 08-23-2018, 12:43 PM   #23
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Lots of good insight here. I think on some level it depends on your personality. For me, I would have bought my boat with a single but I slightly prefer twins.

On some boats access with twins can be more difficult and twins will always use more fuel unless you run just one at a time which I'm going to try. Of course double the maintenance but for reasonable engines we're not talking that much more. I DO like that you can have a more protected prop with a single, but on some twin boats the keel is lower than the props. (My keel is 10" lower) so there's some protection there. Of course there's the redundancy argument and I think overall twins are better in that way especially if you have separate tanks.

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Old 08-23-2018, 12:55 PM   #24
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It will be your boat, your money, you skill level, the real need for a method of 'get home.' Remember, 2 engines = twice as much engine maintenance.
If you bought a boat with 2 engine with the hopes of pushing the hull design to a higher speed, you may discover, 2 or 3 knots with 4 or 5 time the fuel consumption. IMO, anything above hull speed should be reserved for desperate times or if you want to drain the fuel tanks for inspection or end of season refueling.
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Old 08-23-2018, 01:53 PM   #25
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I come out of our fairway (very narrow) and never change gears. My 45 degree rudder deflection and large rudder area make for very sharp turns.

Trick trailing edge rudder modifications can even do better.
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Old 08-23-2018, 02:12 PM   #26
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Part of this decision is where you are going to boat.
What are yall's thoughts on twin v single when doing a lot of river cruising? How available is a tow service between down from Knoxville and around to Nashville (ie the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers)
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Old 08-23-2018, 03:41 PM   #27
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I had this question about a year ago regarding the Mainship 400. I saw a thread here called Mainship shopping and learned a lot. I suggest you read it. I ended up buying a twin. Two engines are better than one when you run over a submerged mooring as I did. Limped home on one engine safe and sound.
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Old 08-23-2018, 03:43 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trick
trailing edge rudder modifications can even do better.

Expand on your trailing edge rudder modifications please.


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Old 08-23-2018, 04:37 PM   #29
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I don’t have much to add, but my own personal experience. Previous two boats had twins (39 and 44 ft.) and I could take them in the tightest areas with confidence. I would be lying if I said I wasn’t a bit nervous regarding my recent transition to a single. I have a lot more to learn about single screws, but So far, knock wood, it has not been an issue and I have done some close quarter maneuvering in the crowded mooring and anchor fields.
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:51 PM   #30
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Quote:
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Expand on your trailing edge rudder modifications please.


mike

I think I recall a thread from a couple years back on that... It was pretty informative.


http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...ons-24331.html
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Old 08-23-2018, 10:22 PM   #31
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I've had both - three Riviera sport-fishers with twins and now a 53ft Westcoaster semi displacement with a big single and a big hydraulic bow-thruster.
The single with bow-thruster is much easier to handle in close quarters than the twins and has much lower maintenance costs. I would never want to go back to twins.
With a bit of practice, you can get pretty damn good handing a big boat on your own especially if you have an aft station.
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Old 08-24-2018, 05:55 AM   #32
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Boat handling can be learned or fixed with thrusters.

That was never a concern of mine.

Being stranded some place I don't want to be is. The cost difference can add up quick and be a heck of an inconvenience. As posted before, it doesn't have to be throwing a crank that does it either....it can be something simple, yet not easy to fix or get a part for.
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Old 08-24-2018, 09:11 AM   #33
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I"m considering on purchasing a Mainship 350/390 and whether it should be a single or two engines. The single comes with a bow thruster. Two engines would be better for docking and may be safer, but I would loose the economy of a single. How much more would it cost to run two engines for economy? How much more to maintain two engines? What are the real trade offs? Thanks.
For a true apples to apples comparison, we need to know if the MS350s you are comparing have the same total hp, or does the twin version have twice the hp?
IF the same total hp, your maintenance costs should be similar, since your total amt of oil, size of filters, cost of impellers, etc should be near twice for the bigger single than for each of the small twins. If using 2 of the same engine, then double those costs. That won't be a deal maker, though, as your frequency of purchasing those items will be very low. Most do the servicing annually, so take your annual cost and compare it to things like slip fees, haulout costs, fuel consumption and maintenance becomes insignificant.
For manouvering, redundancy in case of a failure, get home safety, twins easily justify any small extra cost.
Running twins at trawler speed will cost no more than a single, as it is not the number of props in the water that defines the cost, it is the size of the stern wave. Keep that wave down and your economy survives. Let it grow and economy is lost.
Not many equipped with twins run them at the speed they would make with a single. Are you that kind of person? OTOH, getting there a little sooner is worth something too.
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Old 08-24-2018, 09:48 PM   #34
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My first big boat was twins in 1961. And all my personal boats since were twins except for a couple sailboats. In all that time I came in on one engine twice. Neither time was caused by an engine. I have twins because I like the handling. Having a spare is gravy.
You do have twice the engine/transmission/propulsion train maintenance, but in proper installs, twins can be as economic in fuel as singles.
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Old 08-25-2018, 03:06 AM   #35
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After operating single engines (lawn mowers, outboards, sailboats, motor boat, automobiles, and once an airplane), the engines never failed to "bring me home" over the last 60 years of their operation (knock on wood).

(My Dad's B-17 bomber was shot down over Germany even though it had FOUR engines.)
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Old 08-26-2018, 03:44 AM   #36
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The standard here, in more recent boats, is twins, often plus bowthruster, OR single plus thrusters both ends. And some twins, with thrusters both ends,sometimes with integrating Yacht Controller.

Problem is, I think, anecdotally, thrusters fail more engines,and if they do, an operator used to manouvering/docking with thrusters has to work without. I`ve seen it happen on our marina, and suspect it`s a greater problem than engine failure needing redundancy. And it`s likely to happen just when you don`t want. like if you need the thrusters for extended periods and they overheat or drain their batts. However that redundancy can be mighty helpful for manouvering.

And that`s why I prefer twins. But read up on the old threads, no lack of them.
The hairy chested Swinging Ds will tell you a single no thrusters is all you need, but I disagree, some help is no bad thing.
On the third day of boat ownership one of our engines had to be shut down due to a fractured injector fuel supply pipe. Of course it was getting dark and the wind was howling. So, yes, it was a fuel problem but not the kind of problem one can mitigate with diligence. I am, accordingly, a fan of twins. Then, there was our recent experience in the Ottawa locks when a drive coupler fractured on one transmission. Our second engine saved the day. Yes, many, many folks go decades with singles and never have a problem, so some say. We do have a bow thruster but I have learned to dock the boat without using it except for convenient but not mecessary tweaks.
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Old 08-31-2018, 12:44 PM   #37
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I bought a Mainship pilot 34 with single 370hp Yanmar. easily planes at 15kts. I looked at twins as well but chose the single (with thruster) due to the excellent engine room space (even for storage), much reduced costs, reduced weight, reduced noise, and my broker showed me the stats that the single engine was more popular and sold for more for this particular boat.
The trawler you seek may be more popular in the twin version - get some comps and see.

PS we love the boat. 250 gal of fuel at 8 kts trawl speed lasts a long time. I average 3.5 gph running a mix of trawl and planing speeds.
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Old 08-31-2018, 12:49 PM   #38
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I have been around boats most of my life. I will only own boats with twins anymore. Problems happen and they happen more often on the water. Wires get corroded, batteries fail, bad fuel, mechanicals fail, etc, etc, etc.

A boat is not like your car, where you will pull over to the side and call AAA to come and tow you home. Add that to the fact on a boat, weather may or may not be with you and having a means of making headway is going to mean the difference between life and death. Sure you can call Boat US or Vessel Assist. The last person here in the PNW that I know called Vessel Assist was told that it would bat least 5 hours before they could even start heading their way.

With twins, 90% of the time, I can get myself home.
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Old 08-31-2018, 12:51 PM   #39
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twin or single

twins says it all...twice the maintenance costs and fuel costs and half the range...the access to the engine is a BIG factor.
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Old 08-31-2018, 12:56 PM   #40
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twins vs.single

I have owned several single engine aircraft is my lifetime. Engine failure is not an option. Proper maintenance, on the ground or dock, is the key for keeping the propeller or screw turning...just sayin'. KNOW YOUR BOAT.
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