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Old 03-18-2020, 02:52 AM   #21
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And considering a day tank is supposed to be exactly that, which is enough fuel to run a day or two I don’t really see the point in automating it, doing proper engine room checks what’s a couple extra min every day in the engine room flicking a switch and watching fuel go up in a sight glass. A proper professional setup like above is probably close to $800 just for those 4 float switches and I just don’t see the advantage over doing it by hand. I’d rather spend the money somewhere else
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Old 03-18-2020, 10:18 AM   #22
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As a tankerman who would loose his license and livelihood with a spill from negligence this would be the only setup I would consider other than monitoring it in person with a hand switch. This is a day rank setup for our generators on board the tow boat Im on. You have two Murphy switches (white ones) setup on alarms, one for high level before it overfills and the other a low level in case the system does not kick on when its supposed to to fill it up so you dont run the generators dry. Then there are two float switches (Red ones) one high one low for kicking on and off the transfer pump.
Now were talking! Thanks for posting this. Its interesting to see a professional solution.
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Old 03-20-2020, 06:25 AM   #23
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Instead of a system vacuum gauge a more accurate filter monitoring setup would be a DP gauge.

A differential pressure gauge (can be a Murphy alarmed unit) is installed at the helm where it can be watched.

It mounts to the input and output of the filter and registers the difference.
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Old 03-20-2020, 12:45 PM   #24
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Instead of a system vacuum gauge a more accurate filter monitoring setup would be a DP gauge.

A differential pressure gauge (can be a Murphy alarmed unit) is installed at the helm where it can be watched.

It mounts to the input and output of the filter and registers the difference.
i disagree well kinda .while a DP gauge would be more accurate in filter checking,but a plain vacuum gauge would alert you to any restriction in the system before the gauge .

i like the idea of having a day tank . but not of buying and installing one .maybe if my to do list was empty but that will never happen .
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Old 03-20-2020, 01:48 PM   #25
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I have a day tank for my Dickinson diesel stove. It is tricky, trusting my air pressure gauges. The key for me is keeping an eye and an ear on the overflow vent for warning burps, battens in hand, and remembering not to overfill it, using the hand pump, beyond the indicated 8".
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Old 03-20-2020, 03:21 PM   #26
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The reed/float switches are quite inexpensive at McMaster or Grainger. I would use two in series for safety.

That said, reed switches won't carry much amperage so your pump needs to be small or relay controlled.
While solving one perceived problem, you may be creating another if this fill system goes down for some reason.
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Old 03-23-2020, 03:25 PM   #27
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I would never have an auto fill on the day tank.

Filling the day tank as needed puts you down in the engine room to give a quick look over while there.

My main reason why not is that things simply fail when you dont want them to.

You could put all your fuel overboard from the vent and never know till you figure out your day tank is empty, or the Coast Guard happens to call.

I would do the opposite and put a Murphy float switch on the tank to kick off the pump, and sound alarm if at a high level (95%) when I got side tracked on something while topping up the day tank.
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Old 03-23-2020, 05:49 PM   #28
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+1 on the twist-type timer switch. Works great for me. (I also set a time on my phone to check it a few minutes early, just in case!)
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:20 PM   #29
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I don’t understand the purpose of a day tank in a simple boat but why not just gravity feed it? My GB32 had a pair of Racors, switchable with a remote vacuum gauge, which fed to a second Racor with a small electric pump for filter changing. Manufactured fuel lines. No leaks no spills and more than adequate filtration.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:35 PM   #30
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My "day" tank gravity feeds (from its top, T'd to a valved outlet at its bottom) to the mains. There is no risk of overfilling from transferring fuel.
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