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Old 12-19-2017, 05:39 PM   #21
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I would guess that most oil filters go immediately (or when the oil discharged from the pump meets the filter media) to bypass upon startup due to the high viscosity of the oil anyways.

Still, I'm in the "fill the filter if you can" camp.
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Old 12-19-2017, 05:48 PM   #22
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I've got a Cummins QSC 8.3; the manual recommends filling the new filter with oil prior to install (it's vertical), and I've heard many mechanics recommend it as well.
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Old 12-21-2017, 09:14 AM   #23
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I always fill the vertical filters before installing, but, don't fill the horizontal or "upside down" ones like on my truck. If not filling the upside down or horizontal ones doesn't cause damage I guess doesn't make much difference on any of them? Especially if, as someone posted earlier, the engine was run just before the oil change.
I do smear some oil on the "o"ring of all before installing.
Best to follow the owners manual instructions.
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Old 12-21-2017, 10:56 AM   #24
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Upside down vertical filters anti-drainback

The filters on my Perkins 6.354 are vertical and upside down. They are anti- drain back filters. I fill them up and screw them on. no mess. I assume that most upside down and horizontal filters are of the anti-drain back type. The previous owner of my vessel was using an incorrect cross reference on the filter which was not anti-drain back. When I changed to the correct type filter a significantly shorter time was noted to get oil pressure up upon starting.


You can easily note the difference in the filters. The anti drain back has a solid tube when you look down in the center hole of the filter. The non anti-drain back style has a perforated tube.
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Old 12-21-2017, 12:02 PM   #25
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...................... You can easily note the difference in the filters. The anti drain back has a solid tube when you look down in the center hole of the filter. The non anti-drain back style has a perforated tube.
Or you can just turn a used filter upside down and see if the oil runs out. I would so this over a container.

My engine manual tells how to change the oil but doesn't suggest pre filling the new filter so I suppose it's not that important. I would if I could though.

Someone suggested shutting off the fuel supply and turning the engine over with the starter to build up oil pressure. The caution here is, that you may be bringing cooling water into the engine but not removing it with the exhaust. This could result in water entering the engine and hydrolock. My engine manual says that if you turn the engine over for 30 seconds or more without it starting you need to close the seacock.
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Old 12-21-2017, 04:47 PM   #26
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Or you can just turn a used filter upside down and see if the oil runs out. I would so this over a container.

My engine manual tells how to change the oil but doesn't suggest pre filling the new filter so I suppose it's not that important. I would if I could though.

Someone suggested shutting off the fuel supply and turning the engine over with the starter to build up oil pressure. The caution here is, that you may be bringing cooling water into the engine but not removing it with the exhaust. This could result in water entering the engine and hydrolock. My engine manual says that if you turn the engine over for 30 seconds or more without it starting you need to close the seacock.
Depends on the engine and it's installation. For the Detroits on my old Hatteras, the manual specifically recommended turning the engines over when starting for "several seconds" (though not 30) while holding down the "stop" switch which cuts off the fuel. So I did, even though they'd fire instantly if I didn't, especially if warm (like after a stop at a fuel dock).
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Old 12-21-2017, 05:56 PM   #27
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My boat when freshly repowered had a remote filter. About 2’ of hose to the filter. The filter was much larger that the factory filter. It was a fill from the top filter and I did fill.
Now since I had oil leaking problems w the remote plumbing arrangement I got discusted w it and removed same going to using the original filter arrangement that attached the the side of the block horizontally. The last time I changed oil there was obviously oil remaining in the filter. Kind of a little mess. Does that have to do w this anti- drainback valve? I was planing on using a ctr punch to poke a hole in the end of the filter on the top. Will this allow the oil to fully drain? Seems to me Marin usta do that. Since the new filter is so small I change it every oil change whereas before I’d change the filter every other time.

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Old 12-21-2017, 06:29 PM   #28
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I used to always pre-fill the filter, but recently read something from Caterpillar saying it may not be a good idea.

Filters usually flow from the outside to inside. If you introduced some crud or contamination into the center of the new filter it would be pumped directly into the bearings. Typically, if you just ran the engine to heat up the oil, there would be enough lubrication in the bearings to handle the brief time it takes for the new filter to fill.

Anyway, just thought I'd throw this out there for your consideration.
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Old 12-21-2017, 10:07 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
My boat when freshly repowered had a remote filter. About 2 of hose to the filter. The filter was much larger that the factory filter. It was a fill from the top filter and I did fill.
Now since I had oil leaking problems w the remote plumbing arrangement I got discusted w it and removed same going to using the original filter arrangement that attached the the side of the block horizontally. The last time I changed oil there was obviously oil remaining in the filter. Kind of a little mess. Does that have to do w this anti- drainback valve? I was planing on using a ctr punch to poke a hole in the end of the filter on the top. Will this allow the oil to fully drain? Seems to me Marin usta do that. Since the new filter is so small I change it every oil change whereas before Id change the filter every other time.
Sounds like my Yanmar on the sailboat (which I just signed the bill of sale on today ) It was really hard to change it without making a mess. I tried all kinds of things but inevitably has some oil I had to clean from under the engine. If I had kept the boat, I was going to put a remote filter in it.
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Old 12-22-2017, 01:21 AM   #30
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I spin my Yanmar filter off over an open one gallon ziplock bag, using half of an oil sorb pad to grip the filter and keep the oil off my hand. Then I use the other half of the oil sorb pad to wipe up what dripped between the block and the filter as it went into the ziplock.

The 8V92 engines on the fire trucks I used to drive all had prelube devices on them, but I know it was to lube the superchargers not the bearings. It added about 30 seconds to the start time on the trucks while the pre lube unit cycled.
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Old 12-22-2017, 01:59 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by neworleansrich View Post
I used to always pre-fill the filter, but recently read something from Caterpillar saying it may not be a good idea.

Filters usually flow from the outside to inside. If you introduced some crud or contamination into the center of the new filter it would be pumped directly into the bearings. Typically, if you just ran the engine to heat up the oil, there would be enough lubrication in the bearings to handle the brief time it takes for the new filter to fill.

Anyway, just thought I'd throw this out there for your consideration.
That is the industry view. 100%.

Unfiltered oil is dirtier than filtered oil. It comes ~20/18/15. We used to add oil to equipment only via a filter cart in pretty much all industries I've worked in.

Filtered oil is generally 19/17/14.

But, my view is if you are filling your engine from a bottle or pail, without a filter, it is no different than filling the filter, n'est-ce pas?

The perfect is the enemy of the good.
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Old 12-22-2017, 06:11 AM   #32
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If its a spin on fill it up, if you think it doesnt make a difference try not filling your fuel filter and see what happens.
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Old 12-22-2017, 09:17 AM   #33
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HaHa good one Swampu,
But the engine will run fine w/o filling the oil filter but die if not filling the fuel filter. I assume that as I’ve not tried it.
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