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Old 01-16-2023, 06:21 PM   #1
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Hurricane, Just Donít!

HURRICANE
Body discovered in a sunken boat belongs to man missing since Ian, Lee County sheriff says
The boater was the last resident missing in Lee since Ianís landfall on Sept. 27 ó bringing the countyís death toll to 75.- Miami Herald

They didnít find him until January 13th. Your boat isnít worth dying for. I lost a customer in Andrew. It was several years before they found his skeletal remains in the mangroves.
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Old 01-24-2023, 10:21 PM   #2
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https://www.fox13news.com/news/body-...rt-myers-beach

https://www.aol.com/news/body-discov...015502717.html
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Old 01-25-2023, 11:15 AM   #3
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HURRICANE
Body discovered in a sunken boat belongs to man missing since Ian, Lee County sheriff says
The boater was the last resident missing in Lee since Ian’s landfall on Sept. 27 — bringing the county’s death toll to 75.- Miami Herald

They didn’t find him until January 13th. Your boat isn’t worth dying for. I lost a customer in Andrew. It was several years before they found his skeletal remains in the mangroves.
A skeleton was found hanging in a tree in Gulfport, MS several years after Katrina.

I rode out Hurricane Elena in 1985. Halfway through, I made a deal with God that if he would save me from that hurricane, he would never have to do it again!

I was 180 miles from the coast when Katrina hit us.
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Old 01-25-2023, 12:23 PM   #4
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We don't have hurricanes up here but we still get some awesome Great lakes storms in October and November.

When one is coming I double and triple my lines, double and triple my fenders and leave it in God's hands.

I was on my boat once, at a dock during just such a storm. It rocked almost 45 degrees port to starboard. We had no place to go so we stayed on board. There was nothing we could do. Just sit there and rock it out.

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Old 01-25-2023, 03:50 PM   #5
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We don't have hurricanes up here but we still get some awesome Great lakes storms in October and November.

When one is coming I double and triple my lines, double and triple my fenders and leave it in God's hands.

I was on my boat once, at a dock during just such a storm. It rocked almost 45 degrees port to starboard. We had no place to go so we stayed on board. There was nothing we could do. Just sit there and rock it out.

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Yep, I know a few people who have rode one out on a boat once. I donít thinkI know a single one who says they would do it again.
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Old 01-25-2023, 04:00 PM   #6
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We rode a cyclone out in Vanuatu one year
Thankfully it was not an overly bad one and we had got ourselves in a good spot
Only got 12 hours notice on satphone which kept dropping out
Several hours of hard steaming into a harbour of sorts where we ran out all the anchoring gear and tied bum into beach to coconut palms.

No way could we have made it back to civilization in time and teleportation is not a thing.
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Old 01-25-2023, 04:22 PM   #7
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When we bought our last boat in Virginia there was a hurricane coming up the coast. The marina spent about a week prepping boats for it. We had about 800í of line tying up up in the slip. We, Radar and me, were going to stay aboard if it was going to be a Cat 1 or 2 and leave if anything above that. Fortunately it turned out to sea and we just got a lot of wind and rain. So we didnít have to make the decision to stay or leave.
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Old 01-27-2023, 08:59 AM   #8
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The two most exciting stories I personally know:

A close friend who road Katrina out on his 37 ‘ ketch, anchored in St. Louis Bay. He immediately started dragging all the way across the bay and could tell he was headed for the woods when his anchor caught a steel cable on the bottom (discovered later). He said he then sat and watched cars, houses, and everything else float by him, waiting for one to hit and sink him. None did.

The other funny part of the story was he finally dinghied ashore, to the Highway, after miraculously getting through to his girlfriend on his cell phone, to come pick him up in her helicopter.

While he was waiting, police approached him and asked if he was okay and what he was doing, and he told them he was waiting for his girlfriend to come get him in her helicopter. He said they were treating him like he was crazy and mentally ill, right up until the point she came in and landed on the highway!

The second was a medical doctor I knew who rode Hurricane Elena out in 1985 in his Cape Dory 30, anchored in Krebbs Lake (it’s really a big bay). He drug, too, finally coming to rest up against a metal barge that the Cape Dory was bashed into until it started to sink. As it sunk, he climbed up onto the barge and spent the rest of the hurricane trying to take shelter behind one of the barges mooring bits, then managed to swim ashore and walk home later that day after the surge went down.

Neither account makes me ever want to do it.
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Old 01-29-2023, 08:00 AM   #9
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Yep, I know a few people who have rode one out on a boat once. I don’t thinkI know a single one who says they would do it again.
I have an acquaintance who is not that smart.
He rode out super storm Sandy in his old 34 Mainship while on a mooring in Noank (Mystic), CT.
He got terribly seasick after about 30minutes once the big winds and waves came. He spent hours on the floor of the salon puking his guts out, while getting battered with just about everything not bolted down in the salon including the sofa, and items from the down galley.
His boat survived fine, and he said he was lucky to be alive......
AND that he would do it again to keep his boat safe.
WTF!

I guess it's true that you can't fix stupid.
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Old 01-29-2023, 08:18 AM   #10
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I have an acquaintance who is not that smart.
He rode out super storm Sandy in his old 34 Mainship while on a mooring in Noank (Mystic), CT.
He got terribly seasick after about 30minutes once the big winds and waves came.
Hahaha. I might try it in some boats, but not that one.
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Old 01-29-2023, 08:21 AM   #11
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The eye of superstorm Sandy went over top of me.

In the right hurticane hole, rigged properly and it is way less dramatic than what some people go tbrough.

What many call protected or hurricane holes, I cant agree with.

I have done salvage ops in 50+ knot, gusring to 60 winds in a 26 Shamrock in NJ. Not fun but in properly protected waters with no chance of flooding not a big deal again...... just what a lot of areas see occasionally in the winter out of hurricane territory.

For the new, probably not advised but with proper experience, and it being your only home, a gamble with merit.
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Old 01-29-2023, 10:34 AM   #12
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The eye of superstorm Sandy went over top of me.

In the right hurticane hole, rigged properly and it is way less dramatic than what some people go tbrough.

What many call protected or hurricane holes, I cant agree with.

I have done salvage ops in 50+ knot, gusring to 60 winds in a 26 Shamrock in NJ. Not fun but in properly protected waters with no chance of flooding not a big deal again...... just what a lot of areas see occasionally in the winter out of hurricane territory.

For the new, probably not advised but with proper experience, and it being your only home, a gamble with merit.
I've prepared my boats for hurricanes at least a half dozen times where the Hurricane hit them directly. I didn't lose a single one, but I was never tempted to ride it out in them. My feeling is, if I've prepared the boat the best I can, there is probably little I can do if something goes wrong in the middle of the storm.
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Old 01-29-2023, 10:37 AM   #13
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The eye of superstorm Sandy went over top of me.

In the right hurticane hole, rigged properly and it is way less dramatic than what some people go tbrough.

What many call protected or hurricane holes, I cant agree with.

I have done salvage ops in 50+ knot, gusring to 60 winds in a 26 Shamrock in NJ. Not fun but in properly protected waters with no chance of flooding not a big deal again...... just what a lot of areas see occasionally in the winter out of hurricane territory.

For the new, probably not advised but with proper experience, and it being your only home, a gamble with merit.

Location definitely makes a big difference. Riding out 80+ kt winds is one thing, but doing it with any kind of sea state or in an area where you have to worry about things hitting you is a whole different game.
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Old 01-29-2023, 11:37 AM   #14
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Location definitely makes a big difference. Riding out 80+ kt winds is one thing, but doing it with any kind of sea state or in an area where you have to worry about things hitting you is a whole different game.

I know, but many consider places hurricane holes that I would NEVER use unless it was the only choice and then I would NOT be on the boat during the storm. Most really aren't good hurricane holes, just better locations than where the boat is usually kept.

Good ones are far and few between, not necessarily close by and I was lucky enough to find some good ones while flying with the USCG.....
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Old 01-29-2023, 11:38 AM   #15
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I'm sure some captains think, "I'll ride it out, if worse comes to worse I'll fire up the engine, point it into the wind and ride it out some more"

Not a good plan.

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Old 01-30-2023, 10:22 AM   #16
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Off topic but interesting! Sorry for the diversion!

NYC almost lost its 59 storyCitibank tower to an approaching hurricane due to a design flaw discovered by a Princeton student who contacted the engineer which would have obviously had terrible consequences.

“LeMessurier compared the velocity of winds the building could withstand with weather data and found that a storm strong enough to topple Citicorp Center hits New York City every 55 years on average,” the authors write, noting that he also found that a citywide blackout would “leave the tower vulnerable even in a less extreme storm scenario. For each year the Citicorp Center stood, LeMessurier figured, it stood about a one in 16 chance of collapsing. It was a catastrophic disaster waiting to happen right in the heart of Manhattan.”

As it happened, Hurricane Ella, the strongest hurricane on record, was forming in the Atlantic Ocean at the time.

The response was swift, like a mobilization out of a disaster film. LeMessurier and his team worked with Citicorp and the NYPD to quietly develop an emergency evacuation plan for 10 blocks around. Three different weather services monitored Ella, and 2,500 Red Cross volunteers were kept on standby.

Still, LeMessurier and Citicorp lucked out. The city’s newspapers were on strike at the time, so they never reported the fiasco. Construction crews worked at night, in secret, to fix the issue and were gone by the time employees came to work in the morning. The story didn’t go public until 1995, when journalist Joe Morgenstern reported it in the New Yorker”

https://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/...kyscraper.html

https://www.lemessurier.com/sites/de...%20Oct2012.pdf
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Old 01-30-2023, 11:13 AM   #17
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Hurricane winds can be amazing. Hurricane Katrina blew the air condition condensers off the top of our six story building. They landed in the parking lot and they were heavy. I would have never dreamed that just the wind would have been able to do that.
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Old 01-31-2023, 11:38 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jleonard View Post
I have an acquaintance who is not that smart.
He rode out super storm Sandy in his old 34 Mainship while on a mooring in Noank (Mystic), CT.
He got terribly seasick after about 30minutes once the big winds and waves came. He spent hours on the floor of the salon puking his guts out, while getting battered with just about everything not bolted down in the salon including the sofa, and items from the down galley.
His boat survived fine, and he said he was lucky to be alive......
AND that he would do it again to keep his boat safe.
WTF!
I guess it's true that you can't fix stupid.

I'm not sure how his staying on the boat, getting terribly seasick, laying incapacitated on the floor of the salon, and risking his life, made the boat more likely to survive the storm. . . . What am I missing?
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