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Old 01-13-2020, 06:15 PM   #1
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Check list

While looking for my first boat I was onboard a commercial air pilotís vessel. On the helm was two laminated lists. One for start up and shut down.
My question is has anyone seen a comprehensive list like that and where to get a copy?
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Old 01-13-2020, 06:51 PM   #2
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Welcome aboard. Check lists are usually pretty specific to a boat. I would generate one based on what you need to accomplish your mission. When we used to travel hundreds of miles each way to the boat, I had a list at home to make sure I had everything I needed before I left home.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:00 PM   #3
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Those who have them have usually made their own. THere is a lot of variation between boats and the equipment aboard.

I made my own years ago but let it slide.

You should easily be able to come up with your own. It simply depends upon how complicated you want to make it.
# is number or quantity

Gear box neutral
Sea cocks closed [#]
Fuel valves off [#]
Batt. sw. off [#]
Nav lgts off
Shore pwr cord plugged in
Batt chrgr. on
Windows closed
All control panel sw. OFF
Electronics OFF ---VHF[#] include the handhelds
-- AIS
-- Sounder[#]
-- Radar
-- Sound system
Lights off - cabin
-deck
W.S. wipers off
Depressurize water system
Stove shut off



and so on and so on.

I did mine simply by listing what I turned on or off over a period of time. Then formalized the list. And yes years ago I used it. I did the same for the RV when we were RVing.
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:21 PM   #4
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If I had such a list at the helm stations it would contain only one item - "Turn the d*&% Glendinning controls on."

The number of times I have been ready to go, on the FB, wife on the dock, and I look down to see no lights on the controls!

And I damaged the boat with doing this in the Abacos too.

First Damage! | AtAnchor.com

Sheesh!
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Old 01-13-2020, 07:58 PM   #5
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Jerry,
I have a few checklists that I am willing to share (for what it's worth), just PM me with an email address and I will send. However, I don't know how useful they will be (other than to use as a beginning template), as they are (as others have stated) quite boat specific.
I also use a series of tags or labels that I place at the helm. They say things like: "thru hull closed", "start battery off", etc. Now, because we are "winterized" I have several additional ones like: thruster battery off, ER vents closed, fuel tanks closed, etc. I use similar tags if I ever have to leave the engine (due to maintenance not complete) in a condition where it is not "runnable". The tags save me from making bad mistakes
At a minimum, I check over my lists at the start of each boating season as a reminder. I have on several occasions been reminded of things I might otherwise have forgotten about.
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Old 01-13-2020, 08:07 PM   #6
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Greetings,
Mr. J. Welcome aboard. I only have two reminders at the helm. Open sea cocks and turn off Naiad stabilizers when maneuvering. At my main electrical and sub panels I have placed pieces of red and green electrical tape adjacent to those switches that should be left on when leaving the boat for any length of time (green) and those that shouldn't ever be turned on (red). I have an old ferrite battery charger that is still wired in but never used BUT it may come in handy at some point.

When coming aboard, all green switches have been left on and I turn on the rest (unmarked).
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Old 01-22-2020, 05:12 PM   #7
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No formal checklist. We have a set of things to do and do them. Things don't need to be made overly complicated. Even if you have a list, you'll only follow-up 'n' times before it just sits there being ignored and collecting dust.
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Old 01-22-2020, 06:35 PM   #8
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Wifey B: We have them also laminated, just like on small planes. We require whoever is captaining, whether us or others, to check off the entire list. Doesn't matter if they've been captaining boats for 40+ years. Of course, they also understand and appreciate the value of lists. There are pilots who don't go through their check lists. I'm not knowingly flying with them.
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Old 01-22-2020, 06:41 PM   #9
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I am in the check list corner. I spent several hours last week laminating check lists. I have check lists for engine start up and shut down, same for genset. List for electrical panel information, upper and lower helm instructions, instructions for short term and long term trips away from the boat. Lists of thru hulls and locations, AC and heat instructions w/checklists. Since the boat is new to me, it will prevent me from making mistakes, and even when I am well acquainted with her, it will prevent me from making mistakes due to complacency. Anyone who is on the boat with or without me, will be able to operate anything on the boat with detailed check lists and instructions. My laminator is one of my favorite tools.
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Old 01-22-2020, 07:01 PM   #10
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I have four checklists:

1. Things to do prior to leaving our slip,

2. The sequence of items to accomplish to leave the slip and the journey to our destination,

3. Shut down of systems when we arrive at our destination or home slip, and

4. Items to do and remove from the boat when we head to the dirt home.
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Old 01-22-2020, 07:24 PM   #11
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In the Navy I lived by checklists. On steam ships, the checklist to get underway was four pages long and started about two days ahead. I made a couple of checklists for my trawler more as an exercise to get the sequence embedded in my cortex, but they were shelved after a year. My current boat seems to do fine without any checklists, but then I am on it daily and get underway pretty often. Its systems are every bit as complex as the trawler's were. I strive to have my boat set up to go with just the need to switch on navigation electronics and ignition breaker - fuel lineup is never changed except for a specific reason and only for the duration of a run and then reset to the "normal" positions at the end of the run. I suppose it might be different if I lived at a distance and seldom visited the boat. Checklists are good things - they can be mentally retained.
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Old 01-22-2020, 08:31 PM   #12
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In all my experiences, there are written checklists and memorized checklists

Ultimately it's methodology and understanding of what needs to be done, when and how critical that is truly important.

Of course that takes a certain personality type, training and practice to be successful.

But ultimately wins over set checklists.

If there truly are critical items, a written checklists as a backup is hard to beat.
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Old 01-22-2020, 08:50 PM   #13
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Check list

Check list are a good thing. I use them all the time, especially as I get a little older or when there are several people or distractions in the cockpit. Actually I have two check list - one for the first startup of the day and a shorter version for use later in the day.



I do agree they are likely boat specific. You probably should just document what you normally do - then sit down with a cup and edit as you see fit and include what you forgot.



PS - I'm also a Private Pilot - I never close the door or release the brakes until all the check lists are completed. 55 years and I've never scratched one or landed with the gear up - yet !!
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Old 01-22-2020, 08:54 PM   #14
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We made one up for our specific boat (both getting underway and stopping for the day) and used it religiously. We were full time cruisers, and found the discipline essential. You'd be surprised what can change from day to day. Making assumptions is one of the more dangerous things you can do on a boat.

As time went on it got added to and edited.
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Old 01-22-2020, 09:41 PM   #15
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Check lists also become even more useful if you're operating different boats or if different people are operating one boat.
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Old 01-22-2020, 09:45 PM   #16
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I'm a checklist guy. Have one for the plane and the boat. Make my own that works for me.


Not too long, but hits the critical or killer items.



Also, use "flows" that are a number of specific items to get done, ofter followed by a smaller check list to cover my tail.


I could also argue to have a operations manual... goes into what you do and don't do. Limitations safety items, maintenance, etc. Don't have one for the boat yet......but thinking about it.
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Old 01-22-2020, 11:53 PM   #17
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Might be relevant?
I watched an amphib beaver set down at Royston with wheels up on pavement.
I could not get out of the vehicle fast enough to wave him off
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Old 01-23-2020, 12:10 AM   #18
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Ted,
Kinda like forgetting that last dock line. Takes so dang much power to get out to the channel - or taxi to the ramp.
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Old 01-23-2020, 12:13 AM   #19
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Yeah, might have the bullrail dragging behind
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Old 01-23-2020, 01:32 AM   #20
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Checklists are good with a new to you boat because thinking about it and writing it down helps solidify things to memory.

The three most important steps for getting away these days are to open the seacock to the cooling system, bump the boat into forward & reverse and turn the wheel lock, to lock, to lock before untying from the dock or pulling anchor.
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