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Old 11-19-2021, 05:26 PM   #21
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Happy sort of, I think swift trawler is what you are after

at 350 or so twin. I think the problem may be there aren't a ton in your price range. We have one bought new, love the boat but it can be aggravating at times. Ours (Jeanneau/ built by Beneteau) is fast if you want it to be, and cruises at hull speed nicely. Seems well built and definitely well thought out, my major complaint is there is not enough room in the engine space for the two Cummins and me. The only technical complaint I have have is the through hulls, isolation valves and HVAC strainers are crap, so plan on replacing at 5 years or so. This might just be an issue on the bay, not sure.
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Old 11-19-2021, 09:13 PM   #22
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Mariner Seville 35’

Hello
My wife and I 4 years ago purchased a Mariner Seville 35’ 2007 vintage and couldn’t be happier. Stairs to a large flybridge so you can carry your food and an R and C at the same time. Large salon as it is a 14’ beam even with fully covered side deck. Single Cummins so fuel economy is good and everything is acceptable.
Mariner was taken over by Helmsman a few years back so if you search 37’ Helmand single stateroom that will be the boat only the galley is forward on port.
Good luck with the search.
Brent
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Old 11-19-2021, 09:48 PM   #23
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Mariner Seville 35’

Hello
My wife and I 4 years ago purchased a Mariner Seville 35’ 2007 vintage and couldn’t be happier. Stairs to a large flybridge so you can carry your food and an R and C at the same time. Large salon as it is a 14’ beam even with fully covered side deck. Single Cummins so fuel economy is good and everything is acceptable.
Mariner was taken over by Helmsman a few years back so if you search 37’ Helmand single stateroom that will be the boat only the galley is forward on port.
Good luck with the search.
Brent
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Old 11-20-2021, 08:11 AM   #24
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Sailoring to Trawling

I’m so glad I join this forum as a friend suggested. I’ve read each reply twice and appreciate the feedback and advice.
In my price range, I will no longer discount those trawler for sale with huge twins (>225hp each). This is giving me a much greater selection. 😎. And our search continues.
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Old 11-20-2021, 08:12 AM   #25
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My wife & I sailed "Calypso V", a Transpac 49 MkII ketch for nearly 23 years and loved every minute of it.
Five years ago, we decided to change from sail to power and faced the same questions.
Following five months of dedicated research we purchased "Grand Spirit", a 2002 Grand Banks 42 Classic and we could not be happier.
The two Cummins 240HP engines, @ a whisper quiet 1500 RPM, drive her along at 8 - 9 knots, in perfect harmony, whilst sipping a very modest amount of diesel fuel. The aft cabin is a joy to use, even on a boisterous mooring or anchor. Neither of us would contemplate a return to our beloved ketch. I would be happy to communicate via email with you, if this will assist.
Denis.
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Old 11-20-2021, 09:34 AM   #26
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We are in the same boat (pun intended).

Been sailors for over 40 years, largest was Krogen 38 (Kadey Krogen's only sailboat), last one was Island Packet 31 centerboard which was the biggest boat we could get under bridge in Oriental. Had a chainplate problem that helped us make the switch to power.

We had similar requirements, not too concerned with higher speeds since we're used to going 6 kts, more interested in fuel economy and comfort, so looked for single screw with bow thruster under 40 feet and less than 4' draft. Spent months kissing frogs, most of the boats in our price range were worn out, but last month we struck gold, bought a Dutch Sturdy 32 AC, built by Linssen yard in Netherlands, all steel construction. They've built more than 3,000 boats and are very popular canal and river cruisers in Europe, but have never seen one in US before.

Are there any other Linssen owners out there to help with our steep leaning curve?
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Old 11-20-2021, 03:26 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Digger54 View Post
Is there such a word? Trawlerer?
My wife and I decided to search for our next boat and listed our 41 Hunter AC sailboat. While we are sad to leave the sailing community and friends, we are anxious for a different means of cruising the US eastern coast esp the Chesapeake Bay.

In the past 2 weeks we have perused many trawler listing between 37 and 43 ft in the $125k and down range from Maine to the Gulf. So many to choose from but we have a lot of boxes to check off. So far it’s been disappointing when I think I find the right boat with most of the amenities, I’ll find it powered with twin 350hp engines. Coming from a sailboat, I always thought of trawlers being a bit more economical that sipped fuel. Being used to visiting the fuel dock every month or two and spending no more than I would for a nice meal, I have to grapple with the idea of always checking my fuel gauges (if they even work).

But alas, the convenience of pointing the boat in the direction I want to travel, combined with the more friendly layout and ample space is worth the trade-off. I am looking forward to finding my next boat.

I’d welcome any suggestion on makes. We see the many Mariner Traders, Presents, Grand Banks, Presidents, Albins, DeFevers. Just looking for the right one. Thanks for reading
We went from having an Island Packet to a Krogen 39. It has a single engine and a full displacement hull. It sips fuel... approximately 1 1/2 to 2 gallons per hour. BUT, it moves at sailboat speed. 6 to 9 knots per hour which suits us just fine. It is considerably more expensive than the price you mention but, it you look for older Krogen 42's you might get lucky. We love our boat.
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Old 11-23-2021, 01:38 PM   #28
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There are already many good comments regarding the transition from Sailboat to Trawler. Both have much in common, but are different. I used to sell Mainships and Hunters. My fav was the Hunter 41DS.

Anyway, I saw some comments about running a trawler at slow speeds. I'm not a diesel engineer, but the basic rule of thumb I was taught is that diesels should be run at 70-80 % power. Newer common rail diesels allow some leeway on this, but you really should be looking at a Trawler already set up to cruise at the speed and fuel burn you desire. I had a Mainship 390 with a single Yanmar 315 HP engine. Cruised at 8-9 knots and was good on fuel. More traditional Trawlers (some mentioned in the first post) use lower HP engines, cruise around 6-8 knots. The options are out there.

Again, my suggestion is to locate the boat which fits your cruising desires as is at 70-80 % power.

Enjoy!
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Old 11-23-2021, 01:44 PM   #29
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The 70 - 80% recommendation isn't generally 80% power, but 80% RPM (unless the engine gives a spec that max continuous power is more than this). 80% RPM is closer to 50 - 60% power along a prop curve. Most engines that aren't rated for heavy duty commercial or continuous duty use will live a short life if actually run at 80% power (more like 90% RPM).



Any engine can handle being run at less than max continuous without issue, especially if it's periodically run harder to get everything good and hot. Some designs do start to show issues when power is reduced too far, but the limit varies widely between engines. Some will burn clean enough and get warm enough to be happy running just a few hundred RPM above idle at maybe 10% of max power. Others need to be worked harder due to either not staying warm enough under very light loads or due to poor fuel metering and injection at low RPM causing a poor burn and making them soot up.
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Old 11-23-2021, 03:18 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digger54 View Post
Is there such a word? Trawlerer?
My wife and I decided to search for our next boat and listed our 41 Hunter AC sailboat. While we are sad to leave the sailing community and friends, we are anxious for a different means of cruising the US eastern coast esp the Chesapeake Bay.

In the past 2 weeks we have perused many trawler listing between 37 and 43 ft in the $125k and down range from Maine to the Gulf. So many to choose from but we have a lot of boxes to check off. So far it’s been disappointing when I think I find the right boat with most of the amenities, I’ll find it powered with twin 350hp engines. Coming from a sailboat, I always thought of trawlers being a bit more economical that sipped fuel. Being used to visiting the fuel dock every month or two and spending no more than I would for a nice meal, I have to grapple with the idea of always checking my fuel gauges (if they even work).

But alas, the convenience of pointing the boat in the direction I want to travel, combined with the more friendly layout and ample space is worth the trade-off. I am looking forward to finding my next boat.

I’d welcome any suggestion on makes. We see the many Mariner Traders, Presents, Grand Banks, Presidents, Albins, DeFevers. Just looking for the right one. Thanks for reading
We to came from the sailboat world having multple sail boats raising 4 children and a big dog on boats from a Noethern 25 to a Balfield 36 in the end. Due to a stroke when i was 58 my balance left me and my wife said it was time to change course. we had a great Broker and bought a Maiinship 390 2003 with a single Yanmar 370 Diesel. Over 4 years we are averaging we are averaging over 4 years 1.39 Litres to a Nautical Mile with an average cost of $15.00 per nautical mile we have travelled close to 2000 miles and close to 400 hours when we started I thought it was a great compromise to keep us on the water and what a pleasant surprise it was to realize how cool this sport is we have fallen in love with it and once we realized you had to stop thinking about where we went on a sailboat and discover new boating adventures we were hooked and never looked back. (Trawlers do not like Beam Reaches Trust me) we are fortunate to have the Rideau and Trent systems at our back door and love the peace and tranquility. then at night turning on the TV and reclining before turning in. great Life, and we have met some fabulous people. I can advocate for the 390 she is a mighty fine and well built craft and in the states I think in your price bracket, up here they are selling for close to 200K CDN. in a very short time as they are hard to find
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Old 11-23-2021, 03:37 PM   #31
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Why the switch?

For those Sailers who have decided it was time to try a trawler I'm curious what you reasoning was? Was it the work required with sailing or the lack of comfort when compared to a trawler? Just curious as we explore the opposite transition - trawler to sailing.

Another question is "did you consider a motor sailor before a trawler and if not why? Thanks

John T. N4050, N4061, N3522, H38E - Former owners
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Old 11-23-2021, 05:34 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N4061 View Post
For those Sailers who have decided it was time to try a trawler I'm curious what you reasoning was? Was it the work required with sailing or the lack of comfort when compared to a trawler? Just curious as we explore the opposite transition - trawler to sailing.



Another question is "did you consider a motor sailor before a trawler and if not why? Thanks



John T. N4050, N4061, N3522, H38E - Former owners
I transitioned many years ago. I enjoy traveling by water and am not that hung up on power vs sail. For most usage, power boat has fewer barriers to getting out and on water than sailboat. If sailing were more approachable, that's what I'd do.

If I had a desire to cross an ocean, go to the south Pacific, or circumnavigate, I'd likely go on a sailboat, probably a motorsailor type boat.

Thanks for sharing -

Peter
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Old 11-23-2021, 05:46 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N4061 View Post
For those Sailers who have decided it was time to try a trawler I'm curious what you reasoning was? Was it the work required with sailing or the lack of comfort when compared to a trawler? Just curious as we explore the opposite transition - trawler to sailing.

Another question is "did you consider a motor sailor before a trawler and if not why? Thanks

John T. N4050, N4061, N3522, H38E - Former owners
I agree with mvweebles, and my last boat was a great sailing motorsailer.

After 15+ years of ownership I realized I was motoring almost exclusively.
This was mainly due to the convenience of not having to do most of the sail
handling myself when taking non-sailors out for the day.

I was also spoiled by having a solid Perkins 4-236 that made motoring a pleasure.

My perfect trawler would probably have a useable sail plan like a Diesel Duck ketch.
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Old 11-23-2021, 07:55 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N4061 View Post
For those Sailers who have decided it was time to try a trawler I'm curious what you reasoning was? Was it the work required with sailing or the lack of comfort when compared to a trawler? Just curious as we explore the opposite transition - trawler to sailing.

Another question is "did you consider a motor sailor before a trawler and if not why? Thanks

John T. N4050, N4061, N3522, H38E - Former owners

I moved from a lifetime of sail to power about 5-6 years ago. Our last sailboat was a Catalina 400. VERY nice boat! However, due to some back issues, I found that I would have a lot of back pain from standing at the helm for long. Handling sails was never an issue, but standing at the helm was tough.



The other consideration is where we sailed. Most of our time is in Puget Sound. In general, when the weather is really nice, there isn't much wind. Since the prevailing winds in the South Sound are out of the South and in the North Sound it is out of the North, half the time the wind is on your bow since you are always traveling North or Sound. Add to that the significant current many places in the Sound and you realize that the amount of time actually sailing, is very little. Sailing in pleasant weather, even less so.


Of course those days when the conditions are good, it is glorious. 5 hour runs flying a spinnaker are absolutely wonderful.


So most of the time we were under power, either motorsailing or not. Also when it is cold, and wet (3/4 of the year) I would be in the cockpit in my foulies and my wife would be warm and snug below. I didn't mind, but it didn't provide much together time.


So we made the switch and it was the right one. My daughter still hasn't completely forgiven us for selling the sailboat, but she and her family enjoy our current boat.
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Old 11-24-2021, 07:52 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
The 70 - 80% recommendation isn't generally 80% power, but 80% RPM (unless the engine gives a spec that max continuous power is more than this). 80% RPM is closer to 50 - 60% power along a prop curve. Most engines that aren't rated for heavy duty commercial or continuous duty use will live a short life if actually run at 80% power (more like 90% RPM).



Any engine can handle being run at less than max continuous without issue, especially if it's periodically run harder to get everything good and hot. Some designs do start to show issues when power is reduced too far, but the limit varies widely between engines. Some will burn clean enough and get warm enough to be happy running just a few hundred RPM above idle at maybe 10% of max power. Others need to be worked harder due to either not staying warm enough under very light loads or due to poor fuel metering and injection at low RPM causing a poor burn and making them soot up.

Like I said, I'm not a diesel engineer. This comes up once and a while and I make sure that I make it known that I'm sharing what I have been told (in this case by Mac Boring at a diesel class, as well as from mechanics at certified service dealers). I've been on boats with Smartcraft which displays load, which was very close to % of RPM.

In any case, I find it only right to let someone who is looking for a trawler for the first time that it is something to consider.
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Old 11-24-2021, 09:34 AM   #36
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Good morning. We were sailors for 50+ years, purchased our Island Gypsy 32 in the fall of 2019. BTW- we looked fair a couple of years.
Of the makes you listed, I would be very surprised to find a 350 ph gas engine. My experience is they would all have Diesel engines - some with one & others with two.
Sipping fuel is a relative term. Our sailboat was gas powered and when running, burned about a gallon an hour with a 20 gallon tank. Our trawler burns about 1.5 gallons an hour, 1.5 knots faster and has a range of 900 nm. (Other respondents will have different figures according to their boat.)
Our reason for going to a trawler had nothing to do with fuel burn but the lifestyle we wanted. Even for our boat size it was like moving from a 600 sqft. studio apt to a 1600 sqft. home.
My suggestion - make a list of “must haves” and “nice to have” and deal breakers. Contact a broker with the list AND continue your own search.
When you find “the One” get a survey on both the boat and engine.
My thoughts. Good hunting
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Old 11-24-2021, 10:23 AM   #37
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Could you explain to this newby what you mean when you refer to a powerboat "capable of confidently going places sailors go"? It's obviously not a draft issue. Seaworthiness? Range?
Yes, what I meant was that the Willard 40 in particular is a very capable and sea worthy vessel. There are very few affordable (under 250K) trawlers out there that could manage sea states taken for granted by sailboats.
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Old 11-24-2021, 11:08 AM   #38
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Yes, what I meant was that the Willard 40 in particular is a very capable and sea worthy vessel. There are very few affordable (under 250K) trawlers out there that could manage sea states taken for granted by sailboats.
Willards are a comfortable choice for ex-sailors. Similar systems and they appeal to the sailor sensibility of no nonsense strength.

That said, I doubt a Willard 40 would achieve CE Rating A without modification. While very stable (e.g. favorable AVS), and due to small engine size the engine room vents are likely manageable to mitigate down-flooding risk, but the window glass area and ability to de-water the cockpit would keep it in the CE B category, same as many others such as thr Nordic Tug 42.

Despite being a Willard owner with a vested interest in hyping the lore, I am bound by integrity to say there are many, many reasons to own a Willard. But in my opinion, the seaworthyness is over stated.

That said, CE B rating is more than enough for my tastes. Design to Force 8 conditions - sustained winds to 40 kts, seas to 13-feet significant height (meaning a third may be higher). These are serious conditions in any boat under 65 feet or so and should be avoided.

Peter
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Old 11-24-2021, 12:25 PM   #39
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My boat supposedly has an A ocean rating, but with the big windows and tiny cockpit drains I don’t see it.

I know personally I can’t handle 13 foot plus seas. Heck I can barely handle 6’ waves.
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Old 11-24-2021, 03:23 PM   #40
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Boat will stay intact and boat will keep crew intact are definitely 2 very different things.
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