Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-07-2020, 07:56 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
GoldenDawn's Avatar
 
City: Brentwood Bay, BC
Vessel Name: Golden Dawn
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 217
As previously mentioned Desolation Sound charters operates out of Comox on the Island. There is also Island Cruising Charters in Sidney but they may be just sailboats. The San Juan’s or Gulf Island are a very forgiving place to start. Good luck.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
John Harper
Golden Dawn, KK42-82
GoldenDawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 08:38 PM   #22
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Ray View Post
Yeah, the problem with that is the brand that holds our interest is Nordhavn, and we can't afford one.
I had a hydraulic stabilized N46. I was slowly bringing back to the "once was" until the yard dropped it, creating a LARGE hole in the side resulting in constructive loss.
Basically, at the time, all it needed was a paint job. Mechanically and the nav. electronics, it was updated and fit as a fiddle. I have conveniently forgotten how much it took it to bring it to that level. The nav electronics were partially updated and the entire boat was ready for a long cruise with the exception of topping off the fuel tanks with an additional 200 gallons of fuel. It carried 1000 gallons of fuel. Naturally the water tanks would need to be topped off too.
The 46ft boat was the perfect design.
__________________

__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 09:16 PM   #23
Veteran Member
 
City: Phuket
Vessel Name: TeoraTera
Vessel Model: Selene 80
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Ray View Post
Yeah, the problem with that is the brand that holds our interest is Nordhavn, and we can't afford one.
Have a look at the Selene brand, as good as Nordhavn, a bit less luxury but much more affordable...
CaptainSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 09:23 PM   #24
Veteran Member
 
City: Phuket
Vessel Name: TeoraTera
Vessel Model: Selene 80
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Ray View Post
Indeed. My primary concern is bobbing on the hook (at anchor). If we're sitting in an anchorage over night, and even the slightest wind swell is going to knock the boat about like we saw in the fast trawler review, I might as well stop looking at boats right now, because my wife won't stand for it:
https://youtu.be/J9kGLdiBl84?t=894
Zero. Speed stabilizers are pretty efficient at anchor being fins or Gyro. I have ABT STAR stabilizers on my boat and I can confirm that my wife really enjoys them...
CaptainSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 09:23 PM   #25
Guru
 
MYTraveler's Avatar
 
City: West Coast
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,403
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Ray View Post
there are things we can't know just yet. We are hatching a plan (five years in length) to figure them out. Among them is knowing how well my wife will tolerate being at sea.
A comment on sea sickness. I suffer readily, but I develop a strong immunity when I use the boat regularly. And many suffers benefit greatly from various preventative medications (not me -- despite wearing Scopalamine patches for the previous 24 hours, I once got seasick while scuba diving 60' below the surface watching seaweed undulate with the current). There are probably statistics easily available, but anecdotally at least, it seems that no one can stay sick for more than a week or so -- after that they have their sea legs. So, my advice is not to let a little sea sickness interfere with your plans.
MYTraveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 09:41 PM   #26
Veteran Member
 
City: Phuket
Vessel Name: TeoraTera
Vessel Model: Selene 80
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by MYTraveler View Post
A comment on sea sickness. I suffer readily, but I develop a strong immunity when I use the boat regularly. And many suffers benefit greatly from various preventative medications (not me -- despite wearing Scopalamine patches for the previous 24 hours, I once got seasick while scuba diving 60' below the surface watching seaweed undulate with the current). There are probably statistics easily available, but anecdotally at least, it seems that no one can stay sick for more than a week or so -- after that they have their sea legs. So, my advice is not to let a little sea sickness interfere with your plans.
You are right, I do also suffer from seasickness if I haven’t been on the boat for a while (here in Thailand we do have ‘magic pills’ very efficient to prevent it) but after a day or two all is back to normal
CaptainSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2020, 11:47 PM   #27
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,818
Just to put in perspective what you want. Sometimes I find it helpful to exaggerate the problem to see what you are dealing with.

Let's say you are purchasing an aircraft to fly around North America within some "reasonable" distance before refilling the tank. Then to add to the problem, you then decide the aircraft should not only be able to fly from Portland Oregon to most places in North America, but not you want to fly to London as well. Now you have shifted the whole emphasis totally on the aircraft, both size and fuel tanks and certifications, but you have increased the size of your cheques as well.

The jump to Hawaii adds a host of problems you haven't even thought about, over and above the obvious of fuel tank size, smaller emergency engine should your main engine conk out, a much more stringent certification requirement to humour the insurance companies.

I would suggest you limit your cruising territory to Washington, BC and southern Alaska. Just in BC, leaving Washington and Alaska out of the equation there is more to experience than you might think. The coast line as the crow flies is roughly 600 miles from the WA border to the AK border. But the actual coast line is 25,000 miles. Canada has the largest coast line in the world, and BC accounts for a significant whack of it.

Here is a video to wet your taste and I'd leave your boat somewhere in Puget Sound or an area like Anacortes (hard to find moorage) or Bellingham or Point Roberts. At the marina I'm at in Comox BC, 10 -15 % of all boats moored there are owned by folks who live in Alberta.

And now for a tease:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 02:06 AM   #28
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 2,258
Fly to Hawaii. I've made the trip several times in ships and boats. It's a long, tedious trip in anything but a destroyer. Slips are expensive, fuel is expensive, and there's many places you can't anchor.

Sometimes there's a huge swell where you're in the trough most of the way. And that's not counting bad weather. Then when you get to Hawaii, it's crowded.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 08:50 AM   #29
Guru
 
RonR's Avatar
 
City: Everett
Vessel Name: Triton
Vessel Model: 48' Golden Egg Harbor
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 542
How many people here have actually been to Hawaii on a boat?
How about a boat smaller than 100'?
75'
65'

55'



I've done some tug work back in the 90's with a few trips to Hawaii, Alaska, San Diego.

The open Ocean is a lot of fun for the fist 12 hours... then the rest of the trip just sucks getting the crap kicked out of you when its not nice out.


And far as Hawaii goes, you can have it, way to many people. You see a lot of sail boaters that always wanted to sail to Hawaii... put the boat up for sale as soon as they get there and catch the first flight home.
RonR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 09:14 AM   #30
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,532
Been there many times on 500 plus ft. Ships. I would have done it on a small boat if I was younger as a bucket list. Zero interest now on a smaller boat. No thank you.

Life is short, and I respect people who do it, but they are generally making it happen through years of time on the water and prep, and they are generally not posting about it on Internet forums. You read about it after they did it.

I have seen people incapacitated for days on end from severe sea sickness when I worked on open party and charter fishing boats as a kid, and on ships. It works out if other crew are there to to clean up their mess, bring them water, and look out for their general safety. Play the same scenario out solo, or with a significant other who also may be sick...

These postings about newbies wanting to cross oceans are ridiculous. Figure out the basics, get on the water, take classes, study, learn to troubleshoot and fix marine systems, find out if you don’t get sick by time on the water, how much rolling you can tolerate for days on end, and then when you have the basic credentials and water time start posting about your desires to cross oceans.

In the mean time, ask away about basic boat subjects, study, charter some boats, and continue to follow your dreams. There are lots of knowledgeable people on here that can provide guidance.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 09:33 AM   #31
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,593
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonR View Post
The open Ocean is a lot of fun for the fist 12 hours... then the rest of the trip just sucks getting the crap kicked out of you when its not nice out..
That remark pretty much coincides with my thinking. I don't want to throw water on someone's dream of cruising to Hawaii but to make it their goal and then ask what kind of a boat is required just does not make sense! A more realistic approach such as already been highlighted, charter, instruction, short cruises, etc., is the smart way to go. A smarter way, however, is to fly there, charter a boat and fly home!
__________________
Done with diesel power boats! Investigating all electric!
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 10:49 AM   #32
Guru
 
ranger42c's Avatar
 
City: Maryland
Vessel Model: 42' Sportfish
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
Fly to Hawaii. I've made the trip several times in ships and boats. It's a long, tedious trip in anything but a destroyer. Slips are expensive, fuel is expensive, and there's many places you can't anchor.

Sometimes there's a huge swell where you're in the trough most of the way. And that's not counting bad weather. Then when you get to Hawaii, it's crowded.

We got beat up a bit just on a short outside run recently from Georgetown SC to Southport NC. To the extent we had to put lots of stuff away again once we landed and relaxed with a beverage or three. Including returning the protective grids to the overhead surround sound speakers, etc...

That was on a "nice" day with sea states predicted to be 2-3'. Well, OK, the forecast wasn't perfect... and we had no expectation it would be. OTOH, what turned out to be a very short wave period and the periodic asymmetric pairs or triplets of 4-footers -- again not usually/necessarily a huge problem -- got our attention (right down to the teeth) for about 8 hours.

Can't imagine voluntarily aiming for a distance like west coast to Hawaii on an un-stabilized, relatively small, boat. Many here might, of course, but that's not really our beaker of tea.

-Chris
__________________
South River, Chesapeake Bay
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 12:30 PM   #33
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,818
How many people here have actually been to Hawaii on a boat?
How about a boat smaller than 100'?
75'
65'

55'


All the sailboats that race the Victoria (BC) to Maui race every year.

https://www.vicmaui.org/
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 01:00 PM   #34
Veteran Member
 
City: Portland, Oregon, USA
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher500 View Post
These postings about newbies wanting to cross oceans are ridiculous. Figure out the basics, get on the water, take classes, study, learn to troubleshoot and fix marine systems, find out if you don’t get sick by time on the water, how much rolling you can tolerate for days on end, and then when you have the basic credentials and water time start posting about your desires to cross oceans.
I'm sorry, I must have missed the "sticky" post that said, "Unless you've done it, don't even think about mentioning cruising to Hawaii unless you want a good thrashing from the lot of us." I'll go look for it now. In the meantime, if you check my post on the subject, you'll see that my wife declared that as a desire, not a requirement, and it's her idea not mine. Indeed, I have little desire to do it, and have told her so.

Quote:
In the mean time, ask away about basic boat subjects, study, charter some boats, and continue to follow your dreams. There are lots of knowledgeable people on here that can provide guidance.
I've been doing that, and receiving lots of useful advice from people willing to answer my questions. Heck, some of them even follow my numbering scheme. And I'm getting private messages from people who have extended advice, written in a friendly and approachable manner. It's quite the crew here.
JD Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 01:05 PM   #35
Guru
 
KnotYet's Avatar
 
City: Los Angeles
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonR View Post
How many people here have actually been to Hawaii on a boat?
How about a boat smaller than 100'?
75'
65'

55'
I and two pals did it in my Catalina 30. 17.5 days.
In 1981 - no GPS and too poor to have SatNav.
Oh yeah, no autopilot - tiller steered the whole way!
There are no words to describe the feeling of being
1000 miles from land and 100% self-reliant.
I hope to do something similar in a few years if I can!
COVID-19 may actually hasten my retirement, so...
KnotYet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 01:28 PM   #36
Guru
 
RonR's Avatar
 
City: Everett
Vessel Name: Triton
Vessel Model: 48' Golden Egg Harbor
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnotYet View Post
I and two pals did it in my Catalina 30. 17.5 days.
In 1981 - no GPS and too poor to have SatNav.
Oh yeah, no autopilot - tiller steered the whole way!
There are no words to describe the feeling of being
1000 miles from land and 100% self-reliant.
I hope to do something similar in a few years if I can!
COVID-19 may actually hasten my retirement, so...
That's a trip !
But I was referring to a power boat.
RonR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 01:53 PM   #37
Guru
 
Fletcher500's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Vessel Model: Helmsman 4304
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,532
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Ray View Post
I'm sorry, I must have missed the "sticky" post that said, "Unless you've done it, don't even think about mentioning cruising to Hawaii unless you want a good thrashing from the lot of us." I'll go look for it now. In the meantime, if you check my post on the subject, you'll see that my wife declared that as a desire, not a requirement, and it's her idea not mine. Indeed, I have little desire to do it, and have told her so.

I've been doing that, and receiving lots of useful advice from people willing to answer my questions. Heck, some of them even follow my numbering scheme. And I'm getting private messages from people who have extended advice, written in a friendly and approachable manner. It's quite the crew here.
My response to your first comment:

Not at all. There is always a first for everything. But rather than talk about sailing in to the blue sea with little to no open water experience, get some water time under your belt and do the things I and others mentioned before posting about crossing oceans. Also, I don't think I gave you a "thrashing" if you go back and read my post. Just giving you input as to what it takes.

And your second comment:

Agree, there are a lot of knowledgeable people on here . I have learned from them as well. It's a process for sure.
Fletcher500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 02:09 PM   #38
Guru
 
KnotYet's Avatar
 
City: Los Angeles
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonR View Post
That's a trip !
But I was referring to a power boat.
Understood.
That's one reason my favorite trawlers are Diesel Ducks or some others with sail-assist.
KnotYet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 02:21 PM   #39
Veteran Member
 
City: Port Hope
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnotYet View Post
I and two pals did it in my Catalina 30. 17.5 days.
In 1981 - no GPS and too poor to have SatNav.
Oh yeah, no autopilot - tiller steered the whole way!
There are no words to describe the feeling of being
1000 miles from land and 100% self-reliant.
I hope to do something similar in a few years if I can!
COVID-19 may actually hasten my retirement, so...
A friend of mine did basically the same thing. He said they almost missed Hawaii. Then what would have happened?
John R M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2020, 11:04 PM   #40
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,818
That's one reason my favorite trawlers are Diesel Ducks or some others with sail-assist.

I have a soft spot for diesel ducks and motor sailers. The thrill of being in an open cockpit in a sailboat left long ago washed away my one of our ten million rainy days here in coastal bc.
__________________

rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×