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Old 04-13-2020, 09:40 PM   #1
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New trawler size

I am retiring this year and upgrading my boat to travel 9 months a year with the wife. Plan includes both coast for a few years. I have 45 years of boating and 66 years old.The question i pose to the members is should I buy a 47 nordhavn which is a great boat or go for the 62 nordhavn which gives us more elbow room for live aboard , I am concerned that it is too big for us to handle ,the extra cost to run and the problem of getting slips that big. Thanks jp
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Old 04-13-2020, 09:48 PM   #2
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I think the answer lies in the this question...

How long have you been married?

If longer than 20 years, I would say you got it figured out and the 47 would be plenty.
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Old 04-13-2020, 10:03 PM   #3
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The question i pose to the members is should I buy a 47 nordhavn which is a great boat or go for the 62 nordhavn which gives us more elbow room for live aboard.
You didn't mention crossing oceans so why are the choices only Nordhvns? If you are going to cruise both coasts, why not look at some of the coastal cruisers, say in the 50' range. There are some great boats out there at far fewer dollars than a Nordhvn. (Roomier too!)
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Old 04-14-2020, 08:47 AM   #4
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I am retiring this year and upgrading my boat to travel 9 months a year with the wife. Plan includes both coast for a few years. I have 45 years of boating and 66 years old.The question i pose to the members is should I buy a 47 nordhavn which is a great boat or go for the 62 nordhavn which gives us more elbow room for live aboard , I am concerned that it is too big for us to handle ,the extra cost to run and the problem of getting slips that big. Thanks jp
You have valid concerns that may be complicated by limited experience with that size vessel and personal mobility. Remember, whatever your mobility level is now, it's probably not going to be better in 5 years or 10 years. Only the 2 of you can factor that in.

I solo cruise. With a career in boating, I am very comfortable handling my 45' boat. Time is steadily compromising my agility / mobility. Pretty sure I won't be cruising without help by 70.

Depending on how long you plan to cruise this boat, mobility for a couple on a big boat is a serious consideration. Finally, almost any one can handle a big boat under optimal conditions.

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Old 04-14-2020, 09:34 AM   #5
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If it was me, I would go with the 47. You are my age and as I age I become less strong. Also less ambitious. There is actually a difference between walking 47 feet during a tie down or line adjusting and doing the same task on a 57 foot boat.

Although I almost never have to "muscle" my boat around (36 foot) I have seen inexperienced dock hands try to change the position or direction of my boat, and others simply by pulling on a docking line. It simply "aint gonna happen" without a wrap on a cleat or some leverage. Even a 47 foot Nordhvn probably weighs twice what my Albin weighs.

Another factor to consider is the height above the dock of the main cabin. On my boat I just step one step up and over the gunwale and I am on board. I would guess a 62 foot Nordhvn would be at least six or ten steps up to get on board. Thats a lot of steps when you are carrying groceries.

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Old 04-14-2020, 09:45 AM   #6
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You didn't mention crossing oceans so why are the choices only Nordhvns? If you are going to cruise both coasts, why not look at some of the coastal cruisers, say in the 50' range. There are some great boats out there at far fewer dollars than a Nordhvn. (Roomier too!)


I like the quality of nordhavn ,the heavy weather ride quality and the pilot house doubles as a den for needed separation. I looked at hatteras but the size concerned me in less than ideal docking conditions. Thanks for you input. Jp
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Old 04-14-2020, 09:57 AM   #7
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Another factor to consider is the height above the dock of the main cabin. On my boat I just step one step up and over the gunwale and I am on board. I would guess a 62 foot Nordhvn would be at least six or ten steps up to get on board. Thats a lot of steps when you are carrying groceries.

KISS.. (keep it simple sailor)

pete
Pete, you need to go see a N62. The side gate is at dock height, no steps up. The galley is at the same level, no steps up.
The foredeck is 10 ft off the water. Guess where the steps are.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:02 AM   #8
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After having been on this boat every day since December 16th (excluding a ten day trip back home in January) and having anchored most nights, I would consider the ergonomics aspects of each or your possible choices. That would include everything you do on the boat, getting on and off the boat, dinghy handling, anchor handling, daily engine room access, etc, etc. Some folks are partial to Kadey Krogens for their fewer steps up and down for the reasons Ted mentioned. You already know your cruising style so I'm thinking either of the two fit that.

I think I'd be happy with either of your two choices since they are Nordhavns and if the difference in cost of ownership is not a problem.

Good luck with the boat hunt.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:16 AM   #9
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You didn't mention crossing oceans so why are the choices only Nordhvns? If you are going to cruise both coasts, why not look at some of the coastal cruisers, say in the 50' range. There are some great boats out there at far fewer dollars than a Nordhvn. (Roomier too!)
He did mention "both coasts"....which requires a significant amount of travel in fairly open ocean. So if he is considering going back and forth on both coasts, I think an ocean capable passagemaker would be a good choice since you would be going all the way to Panama everytime you want to switch coasts.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:18 AM   #10
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Have you considered the 57??? The reason I mention it is it is one of the boats in the Nordhavn lineup that can cruise at slightly faster speeds with still good efficiency....even up to 10kts. Since range is not a huge consideration in your cruising plans, cruising at 10kts would be quite a convenience....and still a bigger boat than the 47 and not quite as big as the 62.

From Nordhavn:

<<The boat's ideal ocean crossing speed is therefore computed by multiplying the square root of the waterline length by l.l or l.2. In the case of the Nordhavn 57, this ideal speed is between 8 and 9 knots, and at this speed it has a range in excess of 2,600 nautical miles. At the more customary cruising speed of l.34 S/L, the 57 will achieve a very comfortable, efficient 9 to l0 knots. Here, the 57's speed is optimum for most long distance voyages. She's running quietly and smoothly, and she's moving along at a speed that covers 240 nautical miles every 24 hours.

Appreciating the needs of today's time conscious owner, P.A.E. worked even further on improving the upper speed range of the 57. With the help of extensive tank testing, the hull design was refined to include the utilization of a parabolic shaped bulbous bow, full sections aft, and a stern which minimizes drag-inducing suction at higher speeds. The results were significant gains in efficiency, allowing the boat to run easily at the S/L of 1.5, or approximately 11.5 knots. At this speed, the Nordhavn 57 has a range of l,400 nautical miles, making it ideal for coastal cruising or wherever a medium cruising range is called for. If an owner wishes even higher speeds, the 57 can be ordered with twin engines. This arrangement will provide cruising speeds of 11 to 13 knots.

Because the efficient speed range of the Nordhavn 57 has been extended to 11.5 knots, the vessel appeals to those who have been considering planing speed motor yachts or semi-displacement "fast trawlers." It offers reasonable speed without all of the costs associated with attaining higher speeds.>>
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:33 AM   #11
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Deepblue, you sound like an experienced boater, but since you're soliciting opinions, let me share mine based on my experience from small boats to living aboard previously on a 65 steel bluewater twin diesel:

"I am retiring this year and upgrading my boat to travel 9 months a year with the wife." Consider this full time living aboard. To give some scale factor, I prefer living below my means in a modest home, but believe that 50ft is the minimum to have a comfortable amount of space, elbow room and a machinery space that you don't have to crawl through/lean over.

"Plan includes both coast for a few years." Although technically following the coastline, consider this ocean-going work. There are long stretches of unprotected coastline where you'll be 25-35 miles offshore and being hit by weather. In heavy weather, bigger is better.

"the extra cost to run" You don't mention anything about budget to purchase, so I can only assume you can afford to buy either. Then why the comment about "extra cost to run?" The costs for insurance, moorage, bottom paint every three years, fuel, etc., are all rather easy to calculate. So forecasting OPEX it should be rather straightforward.

"... a 47 nordhavn which is a great boat or go for the 62 nordhavn which gives us more elbow room for live aboard" What we call the "size" is the cube of the length of a boat. So your 62 is roughly 2-1/2 times larger. That's a big delta. How do you and wife feel when you walk and visit both boats?

"I have 45 years of boating and 66 years old... I am concerned that it is too big for us to handle" That would depend heavily on both your health and fitness levels. Do you partake in cardio classes, are you weightlifters and physical? Modern technology like thrusters can give you a big edge of course, and they don't break down too often.

Unless you're relatively infirm, you should be able to manage it and in some ways the larger boat is easier to get around than the tight confines of the smaller one. Big boats dock easier IMO. One advice is to keep the boat simpler if possible. That's tough to do with a Nordie since they are loaded with systems, but for example, go with a single versus a twin. Less maintenance and a better engine room.

"... the problem of getting slips that big." That's a real issue. When I was in Southern California I faced that issue a lot, including trying to find 50amp dock circuits versus 30amps. Can you focus more on anchoring out rather than tying up? That will save you ten thousand dollars annually. Load up on solar - try to be independent of land.

BTW, there have been several previous threads on this subject over the years, so do a search for other input as well.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:04 AM   #12
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The N47 is probably big enough to 'ease' you into the activities you are planning.
It's also small enough to fit into more marinas and mooring/anchoring choices.
Nordhavns are known to retain their resale value so after a few years cruising the 47
you can sell her and upgrade to something else.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:16 AM   #13
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I delivered a bunch of Nordhavn's in the 1998-2004 time frame. Suggestion to consider the N57 is a good one - strong boat, well built, and relatively fast. I took one from Dana Point to Ft Lauderdale, about 4600 nms in 25-days. She loped along easily at over 9 kts (220 nm days) burning around 6 gph. I also delivered over half-dozen N47s north to OR/WA/BC. A comfortable boat, but a bit slow. Barely does 170 nms days. That extra 50 nms per day makes a big difference - and the N57 has a very low COG and is damn stable. I do not have much experience with the N62 so will not comment, except as other's have said - man, ton of stairs. But what a great looking boat!

If you're not already familiar, yYou may want to read through Ken Williams' blog (www.KensBlog.com) as he owned and cruised the heck out of an N62. He's a prolific writer who sold San Souci for a larger Nordhavn 60+ footer 8 or so years ago so you can find his earlier posts, and I'm sure he compares the two boats. He is having a Grand Banks built to do the Loop, so he may even compare them. Perhaps as importantly, he and his wife cruise over half the year, so a similar lifestyle to what you're considering.

Best regards - great dream.

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Old 04-14-2020, 11:16 AM   #14
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KnotYet, those are accurate statements. However, at 66 years old, the OP doesn't have too many more "few years" of energy left to upgrade to a bigger boat. Also, that would likely incur a loss of several hundred grand.
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Old 04-14-2020, 01:09 PM   #15
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Mako, I hope that's not true because I just turned 67 and am only beginning to look!
As far as losing money is concerned, both models the OP mentions only exist on the
used market and are highly sought after.
I would be surprised if a used N47 lost much value at all in a few more years of use.
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Old 04-14-2020, 02:30 PM   #16
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All boats shrink after you have owned them for a few months.
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Old 04-14-2020, 03:02 PM   #17
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Itís weird how huge any boat looks on land and how small it looks when sitting in it on the water. Must be one of those parallel-universe phenomena
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Old 04-14-2020, 03:58 PM   #18
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Get a 65 foot Fleming and do what Tony Fleming does and have people to do your bidding.
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Old 04-14-2020, 04:48 PM   #19
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My boat feels small when in the water but when it’s time to wax it’s huge.
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Old 04-14-2020, 05:05 PM   #20
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Get a 65 foot Fleming and do what Tony Fleming does and have people to do your bidding.
Absolutely a wonderful boat until it's time to enter the ER.
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