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Old 05-31-2018, 03:52 PM   #21
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We're not planning to sell everything and commit 100% to the boat full time to start, but rather transition over to the boat more and more as we all become more comfortable.
Wifey B: And if it feels right, do it. If not, slow down.

Also, be careful to make it a wonderful experience for your daughter and instill good habits. We have in our extended group, two 3 year olds, now nearly 4. They love all boats. If we're going to get on the boat today, they'll be wearing their PFD's at breakfast. They love their PFD's because to them it means boating. Helps that they're fancy ones a 3 year old would like. Started with Dora the Explorer.

Don't rush it either. In my limited experience there are many years of difference between a 2 year old and a 3 year old. I think the 3 year old is far more able to enjoy and truly experience being on the boat.
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Old 05-31-2018, 05:52 PM   #22
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In the PNW what are people's experiences with taking a shorter (i.e. 28-36 ft) motor boat through the Gulf Islands? I'd like to not be restricted to just hugging the coastline, and would like to be able to make our way over to Vancouver Island, or even down to Seattle & Portland. I'm just not sure how practical it is in these waters to do so with a low-30's LOA.

As a kid my family cruised the San Juan's and Gulf Islands first in a 21' sailboat and then in a 24' sailboat. Granted a sailboat is generally going to be more sea worthy than most power boats, but it all comes down to picking weather.


Keep in mind that you have outlined two very different types of boating experiences, ocean and inland. Crossing the Straits of Georgia or San Juan can be done in a few hours. It is much easier to find an appropriate weather window. This leaves all the waters of the Salish Sea open to you without exposure to the Pacific. However, the West side of Vancouver Island or down the Coast to the Columbia river are quite different. Many here do that on a regular basis but their are different considerations.


If I was thinking of regularly running up or down the Pacific Coast my boat selection would be different than where I cruise which is on the inside.
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Old 05-31-2018, 06:54 PM   #23
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As a kid my family cruised the San Juan's and Gulf Islands first in a 21' sailboat and then in a 24' sailboat. Granted a sailboat is generally going to be more sea worthy than most power boats, but it all comes down to picking weather.


Keep in mind that you have outlined two very different types of boating experiences, ocean and inland. Crossing the Straits of Georgia or San Juan can be done in a few hours. It is much easier to find an appropriate weather window. This leaves all the waters of the Salish Sea open to you without exposure to the Pacific. However, the West side of Vancouver Island or down the Coast to the Columbia river are quite different. Many here do that on a regular basis but their are different considerations.


If I was thinking of regularly running up or down the Pacific Coast my boat selection would be different than where I cruise which is on the inside.
We spent two months cruising SE Alaska in our 22 foot C-Dory. Spent 15 summers cruising BC and/or SE AK in a well-equipped 26 foot power boat. No question such boats can handle the area, as long as you are tuned in to weather conditions, and act accordingly.
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Old 06-01-2018, 06:51 AM   #24
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Wifey B: And if it feels right, do it. If not, slow down.

Also, be careful to make it a wonderful experience for your daughter and instill good habits. We have in our extended group, two 3 year olds, now nearly 4. They love all boats. If we're going to get on the boat today, they'll be wearing their PFD's at breakfast. They love their PFD's because to them it means boating. Helps that they're fancy ones a 3 year old would like. Started with Dora the Explorer.

Don't rush it either. In my limited experience there are many years of difference between a 2 year old and a 3 year old. I think the 3 year old is far more able to enjoy and truly experience being on the boat.
Oh yes, I can totally see how good habits, and ensuring everyone has a good time, could result in such eagerness! Good call on the ďfunĒ PFD, Iíll have to find some that would peak my daughterís interest.

I suspect that we wonít be buying our boat until my girl is 3.5 or 4, since itíll take time to find the right boat. Plus thereís other activities on land thatíll keep us here until the new year.

I like the comments about chartering to see what we like as well. You can do all the reading you like...itís just no substitute for getting on and trying something out.
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Old 06-01-2018, 07:00 AM   #25
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As a kid my family cruised the San Juan's and Gulf Islands first in a 21' sailboat and then in a 24' sailboat. Granted a sailboat is generally going to be more sea worthy than most power boats, but it all comes down to picking weather.


Keep in mind that you have outlined two very different types of boating experiences, ocean and inland. Crossing the Straits of Georgia or San Juan can be done in a few hours. It is much easier to find an appropriate weather window. This leaves all the waters of the Salish Sea open to you without exposure to the Pacific. However, the West side of Vancouver Island or down the Coast to the Columbia river are quite different. Many here do that on a regular basis but their are different considerations.


If I was thinking of regularly running up or down the Pacific Coast my boat selection would be different than where I cruise which is on the inside.
What kind of boat selection would you make in that case? Would the length be something that you would be looking for, or are other features such as stabilizers, etc more of a consideration?

I hear the waters around the Columbia River can get pretty rough, especially if I plan to make our way all the way down to California, so Iím trying to better understand what would make such an activity safer and easier, besides keeping a good eye on the weather, and not venturing out when you donít have to in rougher seas.
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Old 06-01-2018, 01:11 PM   #26
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What kind of boat selection would you make in that case? Would the length be something that you would be looking for, or are other features such as stabilizers, etc more of a consideration?

I hear the waters around the Columbia River can get pretty rough, especially if I plan to make our way all the way down to California, so Iím trying to better understand what would make such an activity safer and easier, besides keeping a good eye on the weather, and not venturing out when you donít have to in rougher seas.

I don't have the experience to answer the question with any kind of authority. I will say that I feel size is less of an issue than design. If I was looking at a bluewater boat, I'd likely go with a sailboat. Otherwise, for a power boat, I'd be looking at a full displacement hull with some type of stabilization. I'd probably look at passive as opposed to active.


The boat I have is a 43' semi-displacement hull with a single engine and no stabilization. It is great for the Salish Sea and I hope to some day be able to make the trip to Alaska with it. I would even be open to going down the WA coast and up the Columbia. The key for me would be weather windows. Along the WA coast, the weather forecasts are pretty good long enough out that you can hop down the coast. There are some TF members that do it on a regular basis in boats similar to mine.


I guess what I'm saying is that a boat to live on and cruise the Salish Sea and Alaska, is probably not the boat I'd be looking at to do extensive ocean cruising. However, there are boats that are capable of ocean cruising that would be just fine for our inland waters.
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Old 06-01-2018, 01:33 PM   #27
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I see, so if we look for ocean cruisers, we can hedge our bets a bit better.
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Old 06-01-2018, 02:51 PM   #28
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We regularly cruised our Albin 25 with children from our home berth in Mosquito Creek across to the Gulf Islands and north. Also cruised regularly on an Apollo 32 across and up as far as the Broughtons. Typically the cruises were 2-3 weeks in curation.

Of course weather is something to heed, but generally both boats had no problem cruising the region.

Children do tend to take up more than their fair share of space on a boat mind you!
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Old 06-01-2018, 03:31 PM   #29
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Greetings,
Mr. NM. "...so if we look for ocean cruisers, we can hedge our bets a bit better." NOT necessarily so. Vessels purpose built for ocean cruising will be substantially more expensive due to their heavier construction and fittings (think much heavier glass in the "windows"/ports to give just one example).


The advice you've received thus far regarding the capabilities of "coastal cruisers" and the importance of weather awareness is quite appropriate. Don't overthink this too much. Find a vessel that suits your budget and needs and plan accordingly.



Always remember, when it's "man" against the sea, the sea ALWAYS wins eventually.
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Old 06-01-2018, 04:07 PM   #30
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New aspiring boat-owner in Vancouver

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I see, so if we look for ocean cruisers, we can hedge our bets a bit better.


RT said it well. Any boat can be viewed as a tool for a specific job. Consider the lowly Leatherman multi-tool. It will do a huge amount of things. It will do many things reasonably well. It doesnít tend to do anything really well. If you have a large, stubborn Phillipís head screw that needs driving, it probably wonít do the job and you will need a properly sized screw driver.

Many boats are like multi-tools. They can do a variety of things pretty well, but canít do everything well. A great coastal cruiser can be a very versatile boat to live and cruise on. However, it is not something I would want to venture further from shore than a reliable weather forecast. A boat that you can afford, and that can safely take you beyond the weather forecast perimeter, is not likely to be great for living on and cruising with a small family.

Another way to look at it is buy the boat that will work for what you KNOW you will use it for, rather than what you HOPE you will use it for. After you have the experience, then you can make a more informed decision as to what boat to buy.
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Old 06-01-2018, 08:42 PM   #31
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[QUOTE=dhays;668227]
Another way to look at it is buy the boat that will work for what you KNOW you will use it for, rather than what you HOPE you will use it for. After you have the experience, then you can make a more informed decision as to what boat to buy.[/QUOT]

Some years ago a good friend bought a new, extensively customized Selene 66 (72í overall). Made 10 trips to China to work with the manufacturer. He wanted to do some serious cruising. He made a number of trips to Alaska as well as the Gulf Islands, Desolation Sound, etc. His ultimate plan was to go south, transit the Canal, do the Caribbean, and eventually do the loop.

He was talked out of the plan by his Admiral. Sold the boat.

Moral: be careful what you wish for; you might get it....
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Old 06-02-2018, 12:15 AM   #32
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He should have kept the boat and gotten a new admiral !!
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Old 06-02-2018, 03:03 PM   #33
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[QUOTE=Opu;668270]
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Some years ago a good friend bought a new, extensively customized Selene 66 (72í overall). Made 10 trips to China to work with the manufacturer. He wanted to do some serious cruising. He made a number of trips to Alaska as well as the Gulf Islands, Desolation Sound, etc. His ultimate plan was to go south, transit the Canal, do the Caribbean, and eventually do the loop.

He was talked out of the plan by his Admiral. Sold the boat.

Moral: be careful what you wish for; you might get it....
Moral is perhaps to make sure it's the dream of both of you or have a plan that allows you both to pursue your dreams. My college choir director loved to say "He convinced against his will, remains unconvinced still." I've seen many who felt they had talked their partner "into it" but they really were not listening. Now, the OP doesn't seem to have that issue but one still must listen to their own inner voice. Making the decision jointly should reduce the probability of error dramatically. At various points, if in doubt, don't. You see a boat that you think "might work", it's not the boat to buy. The one to get is the one you feel absolutely is right for you. We often try to force something that just won't work.

I look at the current Columbia River Cruisers from TF and they're so lucky that they are spouses who share the pleasure. I'm very lucky that my wife fell in love with boating and shares my passion for it. Had that not happened, we'd not be boating like we do, but would have found something else we mutually loved doing.
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Old 06-04-2018, 03:20 PM   #34
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Loving all the feedback!

This is NachoManís other half. Iím loving all the valuable feedback that weíre getting, and thought it was time to join the forums.

Our journey thus far has been amazing, and we made sure to spend a good many years enjoying life as just the two of us, and living a semi-nomadic life before having little Ace. When nachoman posts about any goals, key thoughts, or concerns, one could be fairly sure that we have had many conversations about them before he posts anything about it. Which is why I figured I might as well join to say hello!

Now, with a toddler (Ace) in the mix, and both of us being passionate about living on (or as close as possible to the ocean) we are definitely at the point of having a boat as our home base. I am Łber excited to read what everyone has to say, and appreciate all your amazing feedback thus far.

I will post some questions soon, but wanted to append to NachoManís initial introduction to state: Hello! Bom Dia! Aloha! Ciao! Bonjour!
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:28 PM   #35
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Welcome to the Forum NachoMan. While I donít have live-aboard experience I do have lots of boating experience, both sail and power. If you are planning on living aboard, power is going to be roomier for the same length of boat for sure.
I find with power you can get more light into the main living area, as there are typically larger windows.
I have a President 41 that has just been listed. Just over 30 years old but several people have said they would love to live aboard this boat. Think about what your needs are with a family and go for as large as you can manage. An older boat will not break the bank, and one that has been looked after can be very accommodating.
If you want you can check out the listing on Calibre Yachts, she is called Seas the Moment.
Cheers
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