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Old 02-24-2020, 08:51 PM   #21
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Greetings,
Mr. G. "Iím having trouble following replies..." Hahahaha. Welcome to MY world, young man!




I love you say ďyoung manĒ, although the OP is almost 60, he is really young! )
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:01 PM   #22
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:03 PM   #23
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Iím having trouble following replies I make to everybody. I canít tell from reading who my replies are meant for. When I finish responding I hit ďPost Quick ReplyĒ. Is that the right thing to do or do yíall not see who my replies are meant for.
Try using the "quote" button instead when responding to someone's previous post. It will show the original post above, with your reply below (just like I did with your post).

I would echo others and add that being a strong DIYer will be key to cruising on a small budget. With yards rates between $80/hr and $120/hr simple maintenance can get very expensive. Major projects can easily exceed the purchase price of the vessel.

Since material costs are somewhat manage-able - using your own unskilled (or soon to be skilled) labor is important to staying on budget. You're basically trading your time for dollars.

Outside of simple projects hiring and managing shipwrights you need for larger, skilled projects directly can also save some significant money. As an example, I recently hired an independent contractor (a rigger) to replace the standing rigging on our boat as I did not have the skills, experience, tools or desire to climb masts during the PNW winter. I replaced all of the running rigging myself. Total cost for the project was less than half my planned budget an my surveyor's best guess.

Finally, welcome to the forum and all best for your plans.
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:17 PM   #24
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In your original post you say you need to cruise cheaply. There are some here cruising on a budget. Janice142 is one. Search out her posts. She's got a link to her web site Janice Aboard Seaweed, living the good life alfoat
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Old 02-24-2020, 09:43 PM   #25
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I've spent my entire life boating and I love it. However, anytime someone says they want to cross an ocean on their own boat I suggest they go to the windward side of the Hawaiian islands, look at the waves, multiply by 2500 miles, and ask yourself honestly if you want to do that..I love boats but would rather look at the open ocean from 30,000 feet!
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Old 02-25-2020, 10:56 AM   #26
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Pete, what Iím hoping to attain from this forum is information. I have gathered information before registering with the website. Most of the information Iím after is mainly is what I will need to have onboard for maintenance, exterior maintenance, what I will need for myself to condition from the continuous salt air, paperwork for ports in other countries, etc. I discussed boat size and type with an individual while in Coos Bay Oregon. I could manage fine with a shrimp boat at $30k. Iím not an upper crust kinda person. Not even close and am more comfortable where Iím at in life. Iím going to look up the boats you mentioned. Thanks.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:00 AM   #27
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Try using the "quote" button instead when responding to someone's previous post. It will show the original post above, with your reply below (just like I did with your post).

I would echo others and add that being a strong DIYer will be key to cruising on a small budget. With yards rates between $80/hr and $120/hr simple maintenance can get very expensive. Major projects can easily exceed the purchase price of the vessel.

Since material costs are somewhat manage-able - using your own unskilled (or soon to be skilled) labor is important to staying on budget. You're basically trading your time for dollars.

Outside of simple projects hiring and managing shipwrights you need for larger, skilled projects directly can also save some significant money. As an example, I recently hired an independent contractor (a rigger) to replace the standing rigging on our boat as I did not have the skills, experience, tools or desire to climb masts during the PNW winter. I replaced all of the running rigging myself. Total cost for the project was less than half my planned budget an my surveyor's best guess.

Finally, welcome to the forum and all best for your plans.
Thanks for the tips.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:01 AM   #28
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In your original post you say you need to cruise cheaply. There are some here cruising on a budget. Janice142 is one. Search out her posts. She's got a link to her web site Janice Aboard Seaweed, living the good life alfoat
I will look her up. Thanks.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:05 AM   #29
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RT Firefly

I got a tip to quote the comment which is pretty handy except Iím wondering if it will make scrolling too time consuming. I put your username on the top of this reply to see how it works. ?
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:06 AM   #30
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I've spent my entire life boating and I love it. However, anytime someone says they want to cross an ocean on their own boat I suggest they go to the windward side of the Hawaiian islands, look at the waves, multiply by 2500 miles, and ask yourself honestly if you want to do that..I love boats but would rather look at the open ocean from 30,000 feet!
That’s good information about the swells. I’ve been told a 35’ would be ok but am skeptical.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:11 AM   #31
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I don't know what sort of budget you are considering.

My understanding is that it would take a costly power boat to cross oceans, or go around through the Panama Canal. The NW passage - eek!

On the other hand, you could do much of the east coast, and/or the Inside Passage from Seattle to Glacier Bay, in a very affordable C-Dory 22 Cruiser. For someone who doesn't need too much in creature comforts, it could be just the ticket. We did much of BC and SE Alaska in ours, and had a fine time.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:17 AM   #32
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I love you say ďyoung manĒ, although the OP is almost 60, he is really young! )
I was hoping my username would indicate that I’m still in the embryo stage of my quest, so yeah I’m very young. Given that Gilligan seemed to be a bit of a klutz at everything he did I could imagine he wasn’t much different as the Skippers 1st mate, so being his deckhand would make me childlike in the boating world. Just some mild humor.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:20 AM   #33
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I don't know what sort of budget you are considering.

My understanding is that it would take a costly power boat to cross oceans, or go around through the Panama Canal. The NW passage - eek!

On the other hand, you could do much of the east coast, and/or the Inside Passage from Seattle to Glacier Bay, in a very affordable C-Dory 22 Cruiser. For someone who doesn't need too much in creature comforts, it could be just the ticket. We did much of BC and SE Alaska in ours, and had a fine time.
Can I cruise around South America to get from the east coast to the west coast in that size boat. I’m not planning to keep a my jeep. Actually I was told by a boat salesman in Washington that he might be interested in a trade.

I just googled the boat and it’s inline with what I have been looking at. If you knew how I was living now you could see that the boat would be more space.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:32 AM   #34
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I don't think anyone should discourage this new member. Capt John.org is a great resource for loop type minimalists. He is on his 3rd go around on a $3500(yes $3500) sailboat he bought in Saint Augustine Fl. Diesel powered,comfortable for him. His son and GF did the run on a C dory/OB powered.
Maybe not everyone's desire how to do the loop but certainly doable in comfort and safety.

The other part of your trip...not so much.
Iím not going to get discouraged at this point. Iím 3 years out from making the plunge. Mostly gathering information and planning. But you are right, not any one person is the same as another. What one requires for comfort another might think is excess. Iím even considering a shrimp boat and remove the shrimping hardware. Would that be doable. Or are those types of workboats not durable for loops. I donít care if it looks like a turd in a pail if diamonds.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:50 AM   #35
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Can I cruise around South America to get from the east coast to the west coast in that size boat. Iím not planning to keep a my jeep. Actually I was told by a boat salesman in Washington that he might be interested in a trade.

I just googled the boat and itís inline with what I have been looking at. If you knew how I was living now you could see that the boat would be more space.
Nope, it's a coastal cruiser with limited fuel range - maybe 200 nautical miles.

Going around South America would be even more challenging that the Panama route.
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Old 02-25-2020, 01:44 PM   #36
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Welcome.
Doing the loop is not started 'small'
Your plans are very ambitious.
Hook up the the loopers and if nothing else, you can tag along without any long drawn out planning other than fuel stops and stop to replenish your stores.
Be prepared for some break downs. What spare parts to take other than fuel filters, only someone with the same engines can make recommendation.

You are planning 3 years ahead. Good. You have time to take classes and practice.
I have a brother in law that is a captain who charters his boat in the Gulf, Sabine lake and south. He can give me some hands on experience but one of the 1st things I read was to take a course. I will be doing that. Iíll take the classroom course right before I dive into this and the practical application course after that. Instead of the loop should I hang out in the Gulf of Mexico for awhile. Can you elaborate on what is difficult about the loop
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Old 02-25-2020, 01:49 PM   #37
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Nope, it's a coastal cruiser with limited fuel range - maybe 200 nautical miles.

Going around South America would be even more challenging that the Panama route.
Iím not going to be deterred by difficult but the fuel range is an eye opener. Given what youíre saying the Panama Canal would maybe be my best option. Is there a charge to use the Canal. Will there be room to add a fuel tank in the 26í boat I was talking about.. I mentioned to someone that my thought is leaning to getting a work boat, like a shrimp boat, and modify it to work for me. Is that feasible? Yíall are giving me a trove of information already.
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Old 02-25-2020, 02:29 PM   #38
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Definitely not

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I donít think I would make that my first voyage .
Iím not making any loops my 1st voyage. Iím considering hanging out in the Gulf of Mexico for quite awhile to get experience doing basic boating maneuvers such as anchoring, docking for refueling, mooring which I think is maybe anchoring, and just learning to be courteous to other boaters. Also what it takes to change from salt water to fresh as I will go up the Mississippi River to around Blytheville AR where I have family in Jonesboro. Iíve briefly read where a person can tie off to mooring buoys for a nightish so there is another learning curve. I am adding the other intents of loop travel to see what is the most advantageous boat to get. I will also be taking classes from both registered instructors and people I know in southeast Texas who charter deep sea fishing guides.
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Old 02-25-2020, 02:35 PM   #39
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Yes, it's possible. It is called the Northwest Passage. Support as in fuel, fresh water and previsions are sparse and very far apart. The way is not well charted. And there is the very real possibility of not making it through in one season which means spending the winter iced in. I'd start with Google Earth and see what lies between St John Newfoundland and Prudhoe Bay Ak. That exercise won't tell you anything about the route. It will demonstrate how barren the area is. Even getting north to St John then south from Prudhoe are not trivial once you've completed the Northwest Passage.
I have family in both St Johns and Goose Bay. Looking at the map I would say Goose Bay would be about 10% of the journey. I don’t think going to Alaska from there would be in my journey but getting information on how to would be advantageous in other voyages. I’m not one to be underprepared.

Which reminds me of another question I would have. Navigational equipment and charts. Are electronic charts available. Maybe something I would put on an onboard computer that doesn’t require internet reception. I have 3 years to become mentally familiar with things.
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Old 02-25-2020, 03:43 PM   #40
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I have family in both St Johns and Goose Bay. Looking at the map I would say Goose Bay would be about 10% of the journey. I donít think going to Alaska from there would be in my journey but getting information on how to would be advantageous in other voyages. Iím not one to be underprepared.

Which reminds me of another question I would have. Navigational equipment and charts. Are electronic charts available. Maybe something I would put on an onboard computer that doesnít require internet reception. I have 3 years to become mentally familiar with things.
The Northwest Passage (thatís what would go between Maine and Alaska is very challenging. I met a man in Wrangell Alaska who has done that voyage 7 times. His boat, custom built in Scotland, looks almost like a submarine (and itís yellow)!

Here is an article about the Northwest Passage:

https://www.boatinternational.com/de...passage--41287
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