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Old 11-22-2019, 06:16 PM   #21
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Hey all,

Im a 31 year old guy who figured he would get his midlife crisis out of the way early and buy a New (to me) trawler, so i picked up an old mainship 34.

I'm Living in Boston starting out in the spring down the Intercoastal to FL and running around from there!

Didnt know if any other pilots or flight attendants might be here doing the same and helping with advice on the lifestyle of commuting and leaving a boat for a week at a marina to fly!

Open to ideas and meeting new people in the liveaboard east coast lifestyle. Cheers
If you are flying into and out of RSW YOU have many options to anchor your boat! In SW Florida.
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Old 11-22-2019, 06:33 PM   #22
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Flew for FDX for 20 yrs, based in Asia most of the time, and lived on our 43' monohull for several. Our schedules were...more-or-less...week on/week off then, but now I can't say.....been retired for 9 years??. You must know seniority plays a very big role in your schedule! Lots of American pilots, hired by local airlines in Singapore and Hong Kong, bought boats to live on, but most did not travel much...they just used them as a place to live during their contracts. But I can highly recommend the cargo world-never had a box bitch about a hard landing, or coffee to cold or to hot, or to early or late!
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Old 11-22-2019, 06:52 PM   #23
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Saltyrudder, it was not clear to me whether or not you are currently living aboard the boat and planning to leave Boston in the Spring headed south in it. I could not imagine living on such a small boat in the winter in Boston.
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Old 11-22-2019, 06:54 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
“Midlife, maybe. Crisis, hardly.”
I guess that all depends upon how long the doctors say you are going to live.

I wish him many hours of happiness.
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Old 11-22-2019, 11:40 PM   #25
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Hello Chris,

Welcome to Trawler life and live aboard lifestyle!

I retired in May after over 40 years of NWA/DAL employment and spent many years on the 747-400 flying 12/13 day trips. I would have liked to have finished on the whale but instead I took the last ones to the desert and finished at the top of the list on the A350. Life was good!


Usually I completed 6 to 8 Pacific crossings in those 12/13 days and always looked forward to returning to the boat to recover from my series of 5 hour naps. We seldom had a layover over 24 hours except for one 36 hour layover due to FAR 117 (which freighter guys don't have to suffer with).


For the last 8 years I have been moving my boat from the Tennessee River to the Gulf Coast and back each Fall and Spring. Your type of flying will easily fit with your lifestyle on your boat.

Enjoy the 74' and the unique trips Atlas has! Good luck with negotiations and never take them personal. It's just business!

Tell Jeff C. hello for me!

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Old 11-23-2019, 01:07 AM   #26
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Usually I completed 6 to 8 Pacific crossings in those 12/13 days and always looked forward to returning to the boat to recover from my series of 5 hour naps. We seldom had a layover over 24 hours except for one 36 hour layover due to FAR 117 (which freighter guys don't have to suffer with).
ALPA is working very hard to make the frieghter guys "suffer" equally from FAR117.
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Old 11-23-2019, 01:09 AM   #27
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How far is the Clearwater Beacj Muni Marina from KTPA???

And good luck to the OP!!! Yes, that schedule is much more conducive to pulling that lifestyle off. I have always thought about that but just don't have the time off necessary to really pull it off. Hell I just bought a boat and trying to get it from the West Coast of Florida to Texas and am struggling with the logisitics as far as schedule goes.
Also, my airline, UAL, is hiring like crazy. Not sure if you're interested but get your stuff in if you are not. We just announced a completely new recruiting department...
Sorry. I missed this question. I'd say 35 minutes most times of the day. The airport claims 30 minutes. The Clearwater municipal marina downtown vs beach is a few minutes less, just because one doesn't need to cross the bridge.
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Old 11-23-2019, 01:16 AM   #28
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ALPA is working very hard to make the frieghter guys "suffer" equally from FAR117.

Caution... thread creep.


FAR 117 for us international guys was the worst thing to come down from the FAA. I had never been more fatigued with the "new rules" than all the years I flew without it.


Cruise safely...



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Old 11-23-2019, 02:06 AM   #29
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Pilots, we're not well suited to boats.

Welcome to the floaties.
Hey! Why not? I flew for BOAC/British Airways for many years before leaving to run my business. Not having a 150 ton, 4 engine Boeing 707 in my garage, I bought a Fleming 55.

I'd say there's a greater challenge to driving a boat than flying a plane. Why? Before 'casting off' for a flight, ground staff would brief on the weather, the trip, the conditions, and serviceability of the plane and the fuel load. I only had to listen and make final decisions. From chocks away to chocks in, air traffic controllers would guide me and look out for my safety.

With a boat, I create the nav plan, I keep her serviceable, I decide on the fuel and I check the boat before casting off. On passage, I have to keep the boat safe with my own look-out. Not only that, but I have to watch the sea state at all times and act accordingly.

Who says driving a boat is easier than flying a plane? I love it!
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Old 11-23-2019, 08:45 AM   #30
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Who says driving a boat is easier than flying a plane? I love it!
Hello Greatpapabear!! (Speedbird!)

Excellent recap of the responsibility of the Captain both on the sea as well as the air!

There are many many cruisers who have transitioned from the cockpit to the helm and they love it!

All the best,

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Old 11-23-2019, 12:12 PM   #31
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Hey! Why not? I flew for BOAC/British Airways for many years before leaving to run my business. Not having a 150 ton, 4 engine Boeing 707 in my garage, I bought a Fleming 55.

I'd say there's a greater challenge to driving a boat than flying a plane. Why? Before 'casting off' for a flight, ground staff would brief on the weather, the trip, the conditions, and serviceability of the plane and the fuel load. I only had to listen and make final decisions. From chocks away to chocks in, air traffic controllers would guide me and look out for my safety.

With a boat, I create the nav plan, I keep her serviceable, I decide on the fuel and I check the boat before casting off. On passage, I have to keep the boat safe with my own look-out. Not only that, but I have to watch the sea state at all times and act accordingly.

Who says driving a boat is easier than flying a plane? I love it!
I was teasing OP really. I flew smaller craft and had to do most of my own preflight checks, fueling, and weather flight scheduling. I never wanted to be an airline pilot. I was gearing up for chartered bush flights. Then health happened.
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Old 11-23-2019, 12:17 PM   #32
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Hello Greatpapabear!! (Speedbird!)

Excellent recap of the responsibility of the Captain both on the sea as well as the air!

There are many many cruisers who have transitioned from the cockpit to the helm and they love it!

All the best,

Rusty
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Good to meet you Rusty! Speedbird is correct, but some 'friends' used to say Birdseed....
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Old 11-23-2019, 01:41 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatpapabear View Post
Hey! Why not? I flew for BOAC/British Airways for many years before leaving to run my business. Not having a 150 ton, 4 engine Boeing 707 in my garage, I bought a Fleming 55.

I'd say there's a greater challenge to driving a boat than flying a plane. Why? Before 'casting off' for a flight, ground staff would brief on the weather, the trip, the conditions, and serviceability of the plane and the fuel load. I only had to listen and make final decisions. From chocks away to chocks in, air traffic controllers would guide me and look out for my safety.

With a boat, I create the nav plan, I keep her serviceable, I decide on the fuel and I check the boat before casting off. On passage, I have to keep the boat safe with my own look-out. Not only that, but I have to watch the sea state at all times and act accordingly.

Who says driving a boat is easier than flying a plane? I love it!
Boy, can I empathize! Going from commanding officer of a naval vessel to owner of a trawler was interesting. No boatswains mates to clean and paint the exterior, no engineering officer and his tribe of "snipes" to keep all gleaning and ready below decks, no XO to whip the crew into shape and handle all the paperwork, and no 10-man bridge watch team to take care of all that stuff.
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Old 11-24-2019, 01:06 PM   #34
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I am a charter pilot in CJs and Citation X.
My wife (also pilot) and I have been livaboards in SF Bay Area for +7yrs. We love it, no point in paying high rent/mortgage for a place your rarely in most of the time.

We leave the boat for weeks at a time with no worries.
Most rec. boaters leave boats for months unattended so no problems really. This has always been at marinas, I don’t think I would ever leave it anchored for extended periods. Maybe moored but I always worry about piracy, marinas are nice.

Anyway, easy transition if your gone for days/weeks at a time.
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Old 11-24-2019, 07:07 PM   #35
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Hey all,

Glad to see theres a few more pilots in the life of liveaboards here then i would have thought! Definutley going to feel it out as i go, and maybe with a bit of luck drop in a marina for a beer or two with y'all.

Boats been pulled for the winter so i can fix her up to my liking having just bought her. She's sitting in conneticut for now, ill deploy her in the spring, putt around new england then mid summer work my way down the ICW.

I enjoy learning new skills so it will be nice to learn how to become a better boater. I did get some crash course on nauticle life at mass maritime academy for the 1.5 yrs i went before full time flyong instead. But i know i have tons to learn.

I hear UAL is hiring and i would be interested, though I love the 747 lifestyle. I might just go for the ride with atlas for a while and hope they get their butts in gear.

Florida seems like a legit place to post up for a bit. Between key west and uo to key largo. Anyone know of any fun marinas worth looking at for a liveaboard? Also thinking of making the run to bahamas after im comfortable in a year or two with more experience.
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Old 11-25-2019, 02:02 AM   #36
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When I retired my wife and I moved from the UK to Guernsey in the Channel Islands. We sold everything and lived on our Fleming for almost 7 years before buying a house.

Loved every moment apart from the NE storms which create a surge in the marina.

It's strange being back on dry land, and I keep wondering if we should lift the house onto hydraulic jacks to simulate movement. The thought isn't appreciated - can't think why...
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Old 11-25-2019, 09:17 AM   #37
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I wholeheartily agree flying a plane is easier than a boat...


Now helos are a different story....


Seriously...boating can be light years as different as flying..... light weekenders versus fulltime cruisers ..... Sunday afternoon next airfield for brunch types versus working aircraft.... too many variables.....
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:22 AM   #38
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Stiggy, just pulled it out for the season to spruce her up. Im with atlas, living the dream of endless contract negotiations. Ill post some goodies when i can. Thats why i made the cargo switch from republic though, to spend two weeks home.

Jsplichal2, those are great points. Im on the cargo side with 2 weeks off usually, made the switch for that reason. Seems like hurricanes will definitley be the real hurdle in my case. I do have family i can bank on down south, but i wouldnt feel right about leaving a boat anchored that long. How does security of an anchorage work in such a case? I figure ill spend most times at the marina. I am lucky enough the company will positive space me from any airport with commercial service though!

Thanks for all the input!
I've been living aboard with your similar schedule for 3 years now, and have been on the move and cruising/at anchor since September (left right after Dorian, made it to KW for fantasy fest and haven't left).
I have a GPS tracker, wifi, and multiple webcams on my boat including one looking at the bilge water. I also invested about 2k in ground tackle and based on the marina prices in south Florida I'd say is worth it. Plus if you always use a storm anchor you'll always sleep well.
University cove near the haulover inlet, islamorada, and the garrison bight in KW have all been good to me! Met a lot of cool people on the way.
I leave my dinghy on my boat and pay a neighbor or local charter boat CA for rides to and from shore when I go to work. Also ubering to the airport is better than paying parking anyway.
I left my car at my original marina with the intention of flying back to get it after a trip and driving it down, but I haven't had a need for it yet!
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:25 AM   #39
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I didn't even think about cargo - that may just work. As far as security goes while at anchor, think about leaving your car parked in the woods unattended for two weeks. Probably about the same.
Depending on how determined you are to stay down south, you could just do what many retirees do every year, move with the seasons. That is stay up in your neck of the woods over the summer, i.e. hurricane season and the weather is great, and move south as the temperatures cool. Winter down in FL etc... taking advantage of year round boating and virtually eliminating the hurricane risk.
Between making friends with as many locals/fellow livaboards as possible, and a half a dozen wificans, and a big anchor I don't think it's that bad unless a hurricane comes.
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:29 AM   #40
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How far is the Clearwater Beacj Muni Marina from KTPA???

And good luck to the OP!!! Yes, that schedule is much more conducive to pulling that lifestyle off. I have always thought about that but just don't have the time off necessary to really pull it off. Hell I just bought a boat and trying to get it from the West Coast of Florida to Texas and am struggling with the logisitics as far as schedule goes.
Also, my airline, UAL, is hiring like crazy. Not sure if you're interested but get your stuff in if you are not. We just announced a completely new recruiting department...
That's encouraging... I'm gunna stick with my current gig for this cruising season, the schedule is too awesome and I'm about to upgrade... but come may I'll be back in clear lake looking to move on again!
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