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Old 10-06-2021, 03:39 PM   #41
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As final observation, consider replacing the breaker. Blue Sea (or Buss) both make reliable breakers. Amazon is flooded with cheap knockoff breakers that are tempting due price but apparently vary widely in their reliability. Good news is they tend to trip prematurely, but not always.

Peter.
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Old 10-06-2021, 03:58 PM   #42
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Bad motor brushes will cause high amps. Did anyone check them while the windlass was apart?
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Old 10-06-2021, 05:42 PM   #43
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Tripping anchor windlass breaker.

My bow thruster and windless are using the same battery upfront that is charged by the engine without any issue.
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Old 10-06-2021, 06:31 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jclays View Post
Everything all clean and tight.
Voltage was taken at the windlass while idle 13.44
Switched on the amperage quickly climbed to 119-123
Voltage dropped at the same time from 13.44 to 10.4 then 9.80 in relation to the spike in amperage.
Check the actual crimps. THat is too much Vdrop, IMO, for a no load situation.
If you physically cleaned the terminals and lugs then that brings into question the actual crimps. They can be tested for Vdrop with some ingenuity. Even a resistance test can be questionable in cases like this.

Clip the DMM to the lug itself and then use a probe to pierce the insulation next to the crimp and operate the motor. You may have to do this at each terminal. THere should be virtually NO V drop at that point. If there is much at all then the crimp itself may be questionable. A few millivolts would be expected at each crimp.

I have written this many times. A digital multimeter, DMM, takes virtually no current to give a "good reading". They need only a few microamps to give that reading. The trouble is where the DMM's needs can be met easily when there is no load that same connection can show a LARGE Vdrop when the load is actually working due to resistance.
THat is why I suggested test while loaded. An unloaded good V reading means very little other than the battery "appears" to be in good shape.

How did the brushes look when you had it apart?
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Old 10-06-2021, 09:43 PM   #45
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Bad motor brushes will cause high amps. Did anyone check them while the windlass was apart?
I did the refurbish. Just a visual and bench run on the motor. Bearings and seals were obvious issues and replaced those.
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Old 10-07-2021, 06:51 AM   #46
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Ok, this is going to sound like the easy way out, but a 24 yo windlass that never worked when boat was purchased ? Iíd buy a new one right off. I had a similar thing happen to my bow thruster. After making all the electrical measurements to assure myself there was no issue there, I had it completely rebuilt. Problem solved. Things wear out in motors, whether a bow thruster or windlass. Brushes, bearings, etc. Time to break out another thousand ! Lol
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Old 10-11-2021, 01:07 PM   #47
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Add a battery at point of use. Big drop in power with 30 ft run. I had a similar arrangement problem. Try running winch with engine running. Battery at winldess can be charged with a dc to dc switch in between to avoid back flow. You can test this method with a battery and regular cables connected direct to windless. Mine was wired with 00 cable and 100 amp 12v breaker.
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Old 10-11-2021, 02:53 PM   #48
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With #0 cable, at 100A and 30' separation, you have 6000 ampere feet. That will give a loss of a little less than 6% at 12V. Not great, but certainly not bad. Call it 3/4 of a volt loss in the cables.



You say that at 100A draw the voltage at the windlass drops off to 9.8V. That's far more than the cable loss and suggests that either the cables or the batteries aren't as good as you think.


I like the idea of putting a car battery beside the windlass and seeing what that does. You won't be able to load it with 100' of chain in your slip, but it should give you a clue.


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Old 10-11-2021, 05:30 PM   #49
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As others have noted, the voltage drop is almost certainly the issue. However, the recent rebuild adds a wrinkle.

In order to narrow down the source of the problem, I would measure the voltage at the battery and then at the windlass posts, under load, to determine the actual drop, but based on this reading alone, at the switch, it's significant. For motor loads I shoot for 3% and I can easily argue that a windlass is a critical component, so it falls under the ABYC 3% guideline.

I would not install a bow, windlass battery bank to "fix" this problem. Doing so requires meeting a host of ABYC standards, including security (much more movement and G force in the bow) ventilation and over-current protection, not to mention charging. I don't like the idea of sleeping on batteries too. I'd also want to be certain the problem is voltage related before adding batteries.

In my experience it's almost always simpler and cheaper to supply power to the windlass with the right cabling.

Why was the windlass rebuilt, was it malfunctioning?
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Old 10-11-2021, 09:01 PM   #50
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Breakers ... over time of being tripped a lot will gradually start tripping at lower amperages. So in addition to all the other really good advice, consider the possibility that your breaker needs to be replaced.

(Same is true of auto-resetting breakers on windshield wiper motors on cars.)
Been there.
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Old 10-12-2021, 06:59 AM   #51
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Could a defective motor cause the high amperage? The windlass is 24 years old. The bearings were completely deteriorated from water leaks and moisture
That would be my suspicion. Bad bearings in the motor or gears. If this windlass was installed by the builder or worked fine in the past, it is not a problem with undersized cables.

I had a windlass completely lock up and not turn at all because of rusty gears and bearings. I got it apart and "fixed" but it failed a year later.
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Old 10-13-2021, 11:31 AM   #52
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Good suggestions everyone.
After checking Lewmar chart in my manual the cabling is correct for the application. 1/0 cable is what is called for. A voltage drop of 2 volts is acceptable to Lewmar.

I cut back 4 inches of cable to expose new cable ends. All bright and clean cable.
Crimped new 1/0 lugs on the cable with the power crimpers I borrowed from work.
Voltage at the windlass improved.

I let out 50ft of chain and the anchor.
Ran the windlass voltage held at 11.2v on the retrieve.
When the anchor came off the bottom the bog in the windlass was noticeable.
Voltage dropped to 11v. Motor was noticeably slower. .
Just too much weight for the old windlass.
Today I will be removing the old windlass and start filling in the 2 holes in the fore deck from the old windlass.
I will replace the windlass with a horizontal windlass.
I am ordering the Class 46 from Powerwinch. I had their Class 30 on my recently sold fishing boat for 16 years and it was flawless.
I liked some maxwells and Lofrans but most didn’t have he Free fall feature that I want.
I fish in 100’ plus deep water and like to drop anchor fast as opposed to powering down.
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Old 10-14-2021, 08:21 AM   #53
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Glad you were able to identify the issue.

You are getting that voltage reading at the windlass?

All Maxwells that I know of have clutches which allow free falling, and most have a manual retrieval feature.
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Old 10-14-2021, 02:27 PM   #54
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Glad you were able to identify the issue.

You are getting that voltage reading at the windlass?

All Maxwells that I know of have clutches which allow free falling, and most have a manual retrieval feature.
Yes the new reads where at the windlass.
Any experience with the Powerwinch 46 class windlass? I've used the 30 class for the last 16 years on a boat I just sold. Worked every time.
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Old 10-23-2021, 12:16 PM   #55
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Received my new Powerwinch class 46 windlass the other day. Removed the old Lewmar windlass and filled the holes in the foredeck behind the pulpit.
I will need to make the foredeck longer. When Mainship built the first 350 trawlers in 1997 they made the foredeck between the raised pulpit and the opening to the anchor locker only 8" wide. The Lewmar windlass was rotated 90 degrees to make it fit. All the 1997's I've seen are this way. The following years Mainship shortened the anchor locker lid 3" to make for a larger foredeck.
I have cut off 4" from the lid on my anchor locker. I have made a new piece that will fit from the back of the raised pulpit and over the first 4" of the anchor locker opening out of 1" starboard. This will put the foredeck at the same level as the pulpit and give me 13" of deck space for the new windlass. It's been raining so I cant do any permanent attachments until things dry out. I will head to the marina and check the fit of my newly cut pieces.
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Old 10-23-2021, 02:29 PM   #56
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Remember that Starboard isnít structural. Just make sure the load isnít pulling on the Starboard as it will deform.
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Old 10-23-2021, 02:56 PM   #57
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I think it is about time for a photo of this work, please. :>
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Old 10-23-2021, 03:13 PM   #58
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Breaker should be as close to the battery as practical. The breaker protects the wires, not the device. If you put the breaker near the windlass and had a dead short upstream of that, you'd burn the boat down. Breakers and fuses can only protect what's downstream from them. My setup has about 60' round trip of 2/0 cable with a 100 amp fuse about a foot from the battery. It's never tripped, even with the windlass stalled out. (Don't stall the motor... If it slows down while retrieving, stop and let the boats forward momentum break the anchor free. Use light forward engine if necessary. The windlass is just for raising the chain and anchor, not for breaking it free or towing the boat to the anchor. Had to have a talk with my deck hand about that one.)
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Old 10-23-2021, 06:45 PM   #59
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Remember that Starboard isnít structural. Just make sure the load isnít pulling on the Starboard as it will deform.
The 1Ē thick starboard will be thru bolted thru the foredeck.
The windlass studs extend thru the starboard ,deck and 1/4Ē metal backing plate.
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Old 10-23-2021, 06:50 PM   #60
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That should work fine.
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