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Old 11-19-2020, 05:18 PM   #1
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too big an anchor?

Are there any disadvantages to a seriously oversized anchor (sizing chart wise) given that she fits perfectly on the bow, windlass is rated to handle it with appropriately sized chain etc? Bought a biggin as a storm anchor for full time cruising and now can't see a reason to just keep it as a primary. I've never cruised the Western Caribbean but some of those squalls look spooky...
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Old 11-19-2020, 05:21 PM   #2
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I donít see any issues if you can store it and the windlass can haul it. Nothing wrong with big anchors. It will hold better in wnidy conditions.
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Old 11-19-2020, 05:35 PM   #3
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If it fits, can be handled easily/safely for normal use, and the weight doesn't cause a trim issue, then it's not too big.
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Old 11-19-2020, 05:43 PM   #4
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You can never be too rich or too thin. Or have too big an anchor.
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Old 11-19-2020, 05:46 PM   #5
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I don't see a problem, but you probably will need to set it. Often times modest winds and current can pull an anchor into the bottom (I'm sure we are going to hear from someone on this). A big anchor may just lay on the surface and have enough mass to keep the boat in place without digging in. I would want to experiment with it and see if moderate wind or current will set it. I'm in the camp of bigger is better, but think a substantially larger Rocna might not dig in with lite winds the way my 73 pound one does.

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Old 11-19-2020, 05:48 PM   #6
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You will be happy when a cold front squall line comes through at 2am gusting to 70 mph.
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Old 11-19-2020, 05:51 PM   #7
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Too big? [Adopting a Foghorn Leghorn accent] Son, I say son, now there is no such thing as an anchor that's too big -- although it could be your boat is too small. Seriously though, as a third generation boater on Long Island Sound (although not lately), I've always been mystified when I see the "official" lb or kg ratings for various boat sizes. I don't mean to touch off yet another anchor debate, but my boat for example -- 37 nominal, 41 LOA. If I choose a fortress, it says 16 or 23. The 16 looks plain silly hanging from my boy pulpit and the 23 doesn't look much better. I know, I know, it's holding strength, not dead weight, I understand, I'm not anchoring a mooring ball on a chain with an engine block dropped to the bottom of the bay. But just as the poster mentioned above, if your windlass and pulpit and hardware can handle it, as long as you don't create retrieval problems for yourself, I don't know why you couldn't or wouldn't oversize at least a little.

(Of course when you snag that undersea cable and have to cut it loose, bigger usually does mean more expensive...)
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Old 11-19-2020, 06:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
I don't see a problem, but you probably will need to set it. Often times modest winds and current can pull an anchor into the bottom (I'm sure we are going to hear from someone on this).
In 4 years of nightly anchoring I have never actually set our 150lb manson supreme.
Never moved an inch either and have seen our fair share of weather, enough that we have deformed 13mm chain - 2 lots in those 4 years.

Quote:
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You will be happy when a cold front squall line comes through at 2am gusting to 70 mph.
I can attest to that
Best coin I have spent to date on the boat was a big new gen anchor.

To the OP, I did not choose the size.
I sent to the anchor manufacturer a pic of our vessel, weight and draft, intended usage and cruising area and let them size it.
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Old 11-19-2020, 06:14 PM   #9
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Or you could just buy a boat that fits the anchor size. Good argument to present to your significant other...
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Old 11-19-2020, 06:40 PM   #10
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weight of boat and weight of anchor?
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Old 11-19-2020, 07:05 PM   #11
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Overkill is underrated. Particularly true of anchors.
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Old 11-19-2020, 08:42 PM   #12
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I've got a 65 pound Mantus, which was on the high side of what was recommended for my size of boat. I thought about going up to the next size just for overkill's sake, but then I decided that if my windlass ever took a dump and I had to reel the thing in by hand, I'd probably have enough of a hard time with the 65 pounder. Hopefully I never find out.
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Old 11-19-2020, 09:19 PM   #13
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Bigger is better and too much anchor is just right.
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Old 11-19-2020, 10:12 PM   #14
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First of all it isn’t the size of an anchor that matters ... or it’s weight.
It’s the abilities of the anchor that matters.

And the abilities are far more difficult to ascertain and/or establish numerical performance standards. That’s why there is almost no conversation about real performance. There’s too many variables also.

You can do research and do experiments to get somewhat relative numbers that will help you choose anchors. But still the bottom will vary and to what degree I don’t know. Since we rarely use or test an anchor to breakout we don’t know how the bottom varies for holding power. It’s common knowledge that anchor tests aren’t very accurate. But they are accurate enough to use the information acquired. I do read them and use some of the information to influence my anchor purchases.

IMO The greatest problem w anchor tests is that most tests that feature most all anchors that you may buy new it tells you nothing about how good or bad your old anchor is. And it sure appears to me that most tests that include some older anchors the older anchors seem to do poorly just because they are old. Re holding power many older types have only 1/10th the holding power as the new anchors. I question if they can actually be that bad. But if you’re reading a road test of a new Honda Accord you won’t find them comparing it to a 1980 Honda Accord. So you won’t know what you have to gain ... or loose. The new car may not ride as smoothly and the new car may not have visibility that matches the old car.

Getting back to anchors most all anchor tests tell you how much holding power each anchor has at long scope. That’s it. And few boaters anchor at long scope as in over 6-1. And more importantly most seldom if ever anchor at long scope. But there’s lots of crowded anchorages and deep anchorages and small anchorages. All needing a short scope. But even more important that short scope is setting ability. Perhaps the most important element of anchor performance is setting ability.

Weight in an anchor is good. Holding power in any anchor is good. But size and weight get you nothing ..... directly. But all of it is of value.

What is profoundly best in an anchor is an anchor that does well at everything. Everything well. Short scope/long scope, high holding power/ medium holding power, sets always to sets almost always ..................
Opps ... I may have proved my own point. If it dosn’t set it will hold nothing.
So perhaps the best setting anchor you can find and one that does well at setting and well at everything else but never poorly or badly. Everything in moderation, w no failures and no spectacular abilities.
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Old 11-19-2020, 10:39 PM   #15
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Maybe the weight of your heavy anchor hanging off the bow will unbalance your boat? Too much weight forward can be a bad thing.
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Old 11-19-2020, 11:57 PM   #16
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Even on a fairly small boat the extra weight of a larger anchor, within reason, won’t do much to trim. Usually it is the weight of the chain that makes a difference. My anchor weighs about 50 pounds so even a bigger anchor may weigh another 50 pounds. That doesn’t come close to the 300+ pounds that the chain weighs.
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Old 11-20-2020, 12:50 AM   #17
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Realize that the anchors are not only rated for your size of boat and profile (to the wind), but also has a wind rating. Rocna's are rated to 50 knot winds, Fortress to 30 knot wind.

Some one here once said, "if they don't burst out laughing at how big your anchor appears, its too small," more and more I think this is right.
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Old 11-20-2020, 12:55 AM   #18
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What ever you do, don’t tell us the size of the anchor. Someone will say it’s too small.
Oh, by the way, you don’t have enough chain.
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Old 11-20-2020, 01:46 AM   #19
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You’re anchor is usually forward and above your anchor chain rode. Tell a sailboat racer it doesn’t make any difference. Racing sailboats are pretty sensitive on bow weight and trim. A narrow bow section can take even less weight.
All said on my two sailboats I like heavier than normal weight anchors and I sleep better. Although I can notice it affects my steering.
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Old 11-20-2020, 02:34 AM   #20
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Generally we are not talking sailboats here.
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