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Old 09-09-2020, 06:00 PM   #1
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Set up a bridle or lay out more scope?

After purchasing a new to me Mainship 34T I replaced the windlass, added a 55lb Rocna Vulcan, 200 feet of 5/16" HT chain and 200 feet of 5/8" 8-plait. Last weekend I finally made it out to Santa Cruz Island. I anchored in 30 feet of water and laid out all of the chain plus 30 feet of rode and did not set up a bridle.

On my previous boat (sailboat) with all chain I always used a double anchor bridle.

Is there an advantage to using a double bridle over just laying out enough scope to ride on the rode?

Thanks,
Steve
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:05 PM   #2
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After purchasing a new to me Mainship 34T I replaced the windlass, added a 55lb Rocna Vulcan, 200 feet of 5/16" HT chain and 200 feet of 5/8" 8-plait. Last weekend I finally made it out to Santa Cruz Island. I anchored in 30 feet of water and laid out all of the chain plus 30 feet of rode and did not set up a bridle.

On my previous boat (sailboat) with all chain I always used a double anchor bridle.

Is there an advantage to using a double bridle over just laying out enough scope to ride on the rode?

Thanks,
Steve
Do you mean bridle or snubber? In my mind at least, a bridle would be a set of lines led from your chain or rode to cleats on either side of the boat to keep the anchor line centered or maybe to orient your vessel more favorably. A snubber is just a length of line led from your chain to allow some flex and take the load off your windlass. It could be a single line to a single cleat.

So a bridle could act as a snubber.
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:18 PM   #3
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I typically use a Mantus anchor bridle, two lines that attach to the bow cleats.

Last weekend I just secured the rode to the sampson post to take the load off the windlass.
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:25 PM   #4
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I typically use a Mantus anchor bridle, two lines that attach to the bow cleats.

Last weekend I just secured the rode to the sampson post to take the load off the windlass.
That should be fine so long as you're okay with so much scope. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but the only reason for a bridle in that case would be if you needed to try and modify the orientation of the boat relative to the anchor line.
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:34 PM   #5
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Thanks socalrider. I wasn't sure if having two points of contact is better than one.
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:45 PM   #6
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The windlass is designed to raise and lower the anchor. The bridle is designed to take the strain off the windlass. Yes, it can be a one arm or a two arm bridle.
Also, the windlass is not designed to pull the boat forward when retrieving the anchor.
Move the boat forward putting slack in the chain then pick up the slack with the windlass. Do again and again until the anchor is well off the bottom then, raise the anchor until it is secure in bow pulpit. Secure the anchor, with a piece of line, to the windlass or something solid and then, take the strain off the windlass.
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Old 09-09-2020, 06:53 PM   #7
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Got it, thanks OldDan1943. I secure the anchor on the pulpit with a hold down strap. Appreciate the reminder to back off the windlass after attaching.
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Old 09-09-2020, 07:18 PM   #8
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You are taking the stain off the windlass ok by securing the fiber part of your rode to the Sampson post, but a snubber, either out to the chain with whatever kind of hook you want or a braided-end snubber which will hold to either your chain or your fiber rode and secured to the post as the primary strain relief would be better in my mind. You would be sacrificing the snubber to potential chafe/breakage rather than the more valuable fiber rode which you could attach to one of the cleats.
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Old 09-09-2020, 07:46 PM   #9
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Your nylon rode belayed to the Sampson post is fine. Bridle only needed if “sailing” excessively around anchor & even then Bridle may not stop it. In shallower water if nylon rode not let out, u might want to employ bridle or a single snubber to release stress on your windlass. Otherwise KISS principle reigns.
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Old 09-09-2020, 10:38 PM   #10
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we have a large boat that has always had a big wind age problems and it pulls it back and forth at anchor.
some times with a snap on the chain
i used a 3/8 blue steel single line to make a single harness with a 1/2 shackle in the middle with a simple loop for shackle at the half way point
Then back to bow to be secured to kleets on ether side.
Works great but our boat is a little heavy and one night it pulled the shackle apart
It worked great
If i was to do it right i would buy the slip on shackle .
can't remember that makes makes a great set up for all sizes of boats.
and far as snubbers i only use a couple on the boat at the dock .
specially on the aft tie where my ropes are short and tight to pull the boat in to dock

they help a lot
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Old 09-10-2020, 03:56 AM   #11
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I don't know what your foredeck setup looks like exactly, but one other consideration is where -- and through what -- is your rode coming aboard (vs. a bridle or snubber). If your rode is coming in over the anchor roller, is that adequate to take the stress of a less-than-perfect anchorage? Are there any chafe points?

Sometimes an advantage of a bridle is that it brings the stress aboard through stronger points than the anchor roller (and with less leverage). Hawse holes and cleats vs. a long skinny platform or small roller.

Just something to think about -- every setup is a bit different.
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Old 09-10-2020, 05:11 AM   #12
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55 lb Rocna and 7:1 scope on a Mainship 34! I'm anchoring downwind of you!

Cats usually use bridles as the cleats are outboard. There are not typically decent center posts or strong cleats.

When anchoring in shallower water where you only have chain out, you will want to rig a snubber of some sort to transfer the load. Many folks construct special purpose snubber/bridles which spins up a debate on the best chain hook. I use a spring line with a rolling hitch to the chain. There are better hitches than a rolling hitch to use, but I can never remember them. If I'm worried about chafe for some reason, I'd rig a second one to form a bridle.

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Old 09-10-2020, 07:00 AM   #13
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IF the boat sails about the anchor a bridal is helpfull.

A single thin snubber line works fine but it should be short enough to not reach the prop if it goes overboard.

I prefer no hook on the end of the snubber so it wont beat up the bottom if it goes overboard. A bowline can tie it to chain a hitch to heavy nylon that wont stretch till it blows hard.

The snubber is the anchors shock absorber so a thin and slightly heavier gives a choice for lighter and heavier winds. 3/8 or 1/2 inch for smaller boats?
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Old 09-10-2020, 08:13 AM   #14
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Question: Putting out both and bow anchor should eliminate sailing?
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Old 09-10-2020, 08:17 AM   #15
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I prefer no hook on the end of the snubber so it wont beat up the bottom if it goes overboard. A bowline can tie it to chain a hitch to heavy nylon that wont stretch till it blows hard.

The snubber is the anchors shock absorber so a thin and slightly heavier gives a choice for lighter and heavier winds. 3/8 or 1/2 inch for smaller boats?

Agreed. Snubber can be attached with a rolling hitch, prusik hitch, etc. just fine, no need for a hook. On a 34, a 1/2" snubber is probably about right, just make sure the line used is plenty long (at least 30 feet, 50 would be better).



For a given size line, you can get more stretch by adding more length. I'd rather have a medium size, long snubber vs a shorter, skinny one, as the longer / thicker one will last longer and be usable over a wider wind range before needing to swap it out or risk failure (assuming lengths are adjusted so both give equal stretch).
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Old 09-10-2020, 08:22 AM   #16
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This season we started using a chain clamp from Mantus, and have been quite pleased with it. It's a beast but it's proven reliable in being easy to attach/detach and stays put while being deployed/retrieved. This being an important factor, as knotting a rope or having a regular style chain hook failing out is an added hassle.

https://www.mantusmarine.com/product...el-chain-hook/

This with a single line bridle to a forward cleat. This takes pressure off the windlass, eliminates chain noise at the roller, lowers the scope angle to the water (a small bit, anyway) and helps reduce some of the tendency to 'sail' in the wind.

As to your setup, with the line/chain combination you could take the rope section of the rode and secure it on a forward cleat or a sampson post. The nylon stretching aspect of the rode would help provide the 'bounce' you'd get from a snubber. It wouldn't change your scope angle, but would potentially affect how the boat 'sails' when anchored. Going a step further with a bridle would involve knotting it to the rode.
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Old 09-10-2020, 09:33 AM   #17
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IF the boat sails about the anchor a bridal is helpfull.
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Old 09-10-2020, 07:44 PM   #18
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Chain hooks are either expensive (Mantus) Or tend to fall off during launch. I agree with previous post -hard to beat a simple rolling hitch, though personally I bought 20 feet of Dyneema and make my own soft shackles. Simple, cheap and strong plus easy to attach to chain. I change ‘em out every 2 years ‘cause I worry about chafe and they r so cheap to make.
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Old 09-10-2020, 08:16 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sseltzer View Post
After purchasing a new to me Mainship 34T I replaced the windlass, added a 55lb Rocna Vulcan, 200 feet of 5/16" HT chain and 30 feet of 5/8" 8-plait. Last weekend I finally made it out to Santa Cruz Island. I anchored in 30 feet of water and laid out all of the chain plus 30 feet of rode and did not set up a bridle.

On my previous boat (sailboat) with all chain I always used a double anchor bridle.

Is there an advantage to using a double bridle over just laying out enough scope to ride on the rode?

Thanks,
Steve
Amount of rode (which includes both chain and rope), 230 feet in only 30 feet of water seems excessive even under storm conditions. Your swing would cover much of any anchorage. Pity other boats under anchor there. Bridles are helpful to reduce load on the windlass, and can help reduce side-to-side motion.
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Old 09-10-2020, 09:44 PM   #20
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markpierce I was in 30 feet of water plus 5 feet to the roller equals less than 7:1. How much scope would you recommend with 25-30 knot wind?

There were over 50 boats in the anchorage and I wasn't swinging more than anyone near me. I use a stern anchor if space is limited.
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