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Old 01-12-2022, 08:10 AM   #21
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Nomad Willy, a Luhrs 400 Tournament is a 40ft solid fiberglass sportfish. Its the same hull as a Silverton 40.
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Old 01-12-2022, 03:27 PM   #22
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So, here's a question....
Suppose we get the OP the "perfect" primary anchor for his boat. Sarca, Vulcan, etc.
Now, for a secondary anchor, primarily for pending storms.
Would you mount it on another roller/chute next to the primary?
Assuming you had plenty of swing room, would you set it out several feet in advance of the primary, and tie it to the main anchor rode? Or use a Bahamian tie?
And when would you launch it? What kind of weather forecast would prompt you?
I added a second roller for my secondary anchor. Pics below. The one in my garage is when I was setting it up and shows it clearer. than the picture of it on the boat. The primary (35 Danforth high tensile) was all chain, secondary (44 Delta) was 20 feet of chain and 5/8ths 3 strand.
I set out both anchors on many occasions.
If the storm was predicted to stay in the same direction, I'd set them maybe 30 degrees apart and at different lengths. Each on their respective roller.

If I was anchored somewhere with "iffy" holding or a very crowded anchorage (think Block Island), I might just drop the second 20 feet off the bow and set it, then let out some rode. This would protect me if someone tripped the main, which happens a lot at Block (very shallow water). I would do this if we were going to be away from the boat for any length of time.

So, it's not always weather that determines when I set out a second anchor. Sometimes it's situation. But the preference is always one (my ancient and reliable Danforth), so I swing with the crowd.
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Old 01-12-2022, 11:58 PM   #23
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My mistake on the 44KG it is a 45 LB anchor. I struggle with metrics.
Yes, east to mix them up. You know it really is time you Americans got up to speed re the S I units. S I stands for Systeme Internationale, I believe..?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intern...ystem_of_Units
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Old 01-13-2022, 10:34 AM   #24
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My mistake on the 44KG it is a 45 LB anchor. I struggle with metrics.
I was always confused too until I had to lift weights for my sport. Living in Europe at the time, everything was in KG but they were exact same plate sizes as the US. So 20kg plate was 45lbs. Just multiple (or divide) by 2.2. Double it and add 10% to go from kg to pounds.
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Old 01-13-2022, 06:58 PM   #25
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Also, in anywhere other than the UK and North America, you can't drive at 50 or 60mph in town, or 100mph on the open road..! Sirens will quickly follow you.

Sorry, thread hijack in the interests of safety now over...
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Old 01-17-2022, 03:15 PM   #26
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SV Panope has just posted his 131st anchor test video.These are by far the best anchor tests I've ever seen. The top scoring anchor is a new comer - the Viking. Theres a chart at the end of the video showing all the test results in different bottoms. The Viking does very well in soft mud bottoms like yours as well as more typical bottoms. He doesn't include the Danforth since it's not a great all around anchor - although very good in one pull direction - especially mud. I would consider making your Danforth your secondary anchor and use a different one as primary that is more likely to reset after a wind or current change.


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Old 01-17-2022, 04:33 PM   #27
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Interesting that the Rocna performed so poorly in this test. I have a 55 lb Rocna and itís never failed to stick and hold, except for one 40 knot blow in the Bahamas where I had trouble getting it to stick in some sand. Maybe it doesnít like sand.
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Old 01-17-2022, 05:09 PM   #28
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We use a 50Kg CLAW anchor on 400 ft. of 1/2" chain when things get BAD regardless of the bottoms.
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Old 01-17-2022, 06:54 PM   #29
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LOOK up S/V Panope on Youtube. He does extensive anchor testing and underwater videos of anchor behavior and performance. highly instructional and recommended viewing for all boaters. I wound up with a Mantus for my 42 foot trawler, but all the new designs perform pretty darned well. Good Luck!
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Old 01-17-2022, 09:24 PM   #30
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Match it. Donít get wishy washy. You know what youíre getting and what itíll do. If youíre throwing out a second anchor itís likely because you are anticipating weather or already in it. Make it easy.
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Old 01-18-2022, 12:15 AM   #31
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mantus m 2 bolts together hence stores easy for that day you need it

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Old 01-18-2022, 03:05 AM   #32
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In the Bahamas I found that many sand areas are pan hard. I would jump in, break the sand to set the anchor then back down on it. I’d only do that if I was in tight with shore or other boats. If there was plenty of room I’d just drop 200’ of chain and let the total weight keep me in a general area.
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Old 01-18-2022, 05:20 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by cardude01 View Post
Interesting that the Rocna performed so poorly in this test. I have a 55 lb Rocna and itís never failed to stick and hold, except for one 40 knot blow in the Bahamas where I had trouble getting it to stick in some sand. Maybe it doesnít like sand.
I watched that new video of Steve's right through. I was intrigued as to how it all panned out, but when you really analyse it all, thinking of the real time use we put anchors to, the stand out feature that most folk want and like is that the newer anchors set so much more quickly, reliably, and effectively than some of the older ones like the CQR.

The series of sets then shows that once set, the CQR performed quite well. It was getting the CQR, or even worse, the knock-offs of it, to set that drove us mad, and set us off on the search for a better anchor, right..?

Then there was the somewhat surprising finding that several of the most popular anchors appeared to not do that well, yet as Cardude says, his Rocna appears to perform extremely well, but did not in Steve's drag test.
Yet Steve Dashew swore by his large Rocna for the much renowned Windhorse.

The stand-out for me was the concave anchors, set well, and hold quite well, unless they are subjected to foces that cause a slow drag. That is when the concave fluke tends to fill with mud, and this tends to prevent re-setting, so eventually they pop out. I suggest most folk do their best to avoid anchoring when and where they might be faced with such conditions, so their anchor is not faced with this situation. If it has never failed, it never fails, right..? Being the flip-side to the saying that an anchor never fails...until it does..!

Conversely, the ones that tend to perform the best in the more extreme conditions are those with convex flukes, eg the Sarca Excel, Delta, and some others, or those with very a shallow concavity in the fluke, like the Viking, Mantus 2, and Rocna Vulcan, that then are able to keep moving slowly through the substrate, but their fluke does not fill up with gunk, so they don't tend to pop out, or if they do, they shed the gunk, and re-set. Again, as most avoid the extremes likely to expose these differences, it explains why most are satisfied with their anchor.

All in all though, an excellent test series, and allowing for the bottom conditions, gives a quite good comparison among the range, with some rather unexpected outcomes.
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Old 01-18-2022, 07:24 AM   #34
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IF one is going to use a single anchor as the "all purpose" anchor its fine if its oversized.

I try to size to the windlass lifting ability , if it can easily handle the weight , anchoring big IS better.
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Old 01-18-2022, 07:37 AM   #35
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Primary Anchor/Fuel Tank lining

Hi Blarg21, many great responses for which would be a great primary anchor. I won't belabor this topic except to say We have a Rocna for our 36' and has held steady through thick and thin. Funny I recently saw a different video test of anchors that showed the Rocnar perform well....burying itself well below the mud surface.

I don't want to hijack this thread, but noticed in your first couple of sentences that you mentioned you had your fuel tank lined....I have steel tanks that are in good shape but who knows....is lining a good alternative to tank replacement? I'm all ears! Who does fuel tank lining? What is it?

Thanks very much.
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Old 01-18-2022, 10:33 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
I watched that new video of Steve's right through. I was intrigued as to how it all panned out, but when you really analyse it all, thinking of the real time use we put anchors to, the stand out feature that most folk want and like is that the newer anchors set so much more quickly, reliably, and effectively than some of the older ones like the CQR.



The series of sets then shows that once set, the CQR performed quite well. It was getting the CQR, or even worse, the knock-offs of it, to set that drove us mad, and set us off on the search for a better anchor, right..?



Then there was the somewhat surprising finding that several of the most popular anchors appeared to not do that well, yet as Cardude says, his Rocna appears to perform extremely well, but did not in Steve's drag test.

Yet Steve Dashew swore by his large Rocna for the much renowned Windhorse.



The stand-out for me was the concave anchors, set well, and hold quite well, unless they are subjected to foces that cause a slow drag. That is when the concave fluke tends to fill with mud, and this tends to prevent re-setting, so eventually they pop out. I suggest most folk do their best to avoid anchoring when and where they might be faced with such conditions, so their anchor is not faced with this situation. If it has never failed, it never fails, right..? Being the flip-side to the saying that an anchor never fails...until it does..!



Conversely, the ones that tend to perform the best in the more extreme conditions are those with convex flukes, eg the Sarca Excel, Delta, and some others, or those with very a shallow concavity in the fluke, like the Viking, Mantus 2, and Rocna Vulcan, that then are able to keep moving slowly through the substrate, but their fluke does not fill up with gunk, so they don't tend to pop out, or if they do, they shed the gunk, and re-set. Again, as most avoid the extremes likely to expose these differences, it explains why most are satisfied with their anchor.



All in all though, an excellent test series, and allowing for the bottom conditions, gives a quite good comparison among the range, with some rather unexpected outcomes.

The reason I ditched my old CQR for my 55 Lb Rocna is I had trouble getting the CQR to set quickly (or at all). It sets so hard and fast I rarely back down on it in fact.

I also have a Fortress FX-37 I can deploy if Iím really worried, but I rarely use it.
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Old 01-18-2022, 09:50 PM   #37
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Exactly, Cardude, and that was my experience as well with a Knock-off CQR type. I sometimes tried so many times to get a secure set I gave up and moved on. The Super-Sarca I then bought, on the strength of a revealing video at a boat show a short time later, was a Godsend, as it always set quickly, and never let me down. However, it was not right up there in Steve's vids. Yet the Sarca Excel was one of the best. They had not been developed when I bought the S-Sarca

I suspect the downfall of the CQR type because of its poor setting, is due to the hinged shank, which must have seemed a good idea at some time - presumably to cater for tidal swings better. However, so often that is its Achilles heel..! Because if the tip does not engage quickly to engage the fluke properly, it then just bounces along on its side, with the hinge then preventing any chance of the tip re-engaging. What I would love to see is how a typical CQR performs with the hinge welded solid..? It might then be a great anchor. Calling Nomad Willy, Eric..?
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Old 01-19-2022, 08:00 AM   #38
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The Super-Sarca I then bought, on the strength of a revealing video at a boat show a short time later, was a Godsend, as it always set quickly, and never let me down. However, it was not right up there in Steve's vids. Yet the Sarca Excel was one of the best. They had not been developed when I bought the S-Sarca

Didn't realize the Excel came along after the Super SARCA...

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