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Old 12-30-2022, 06:43 PM   #21
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I don't usually use or really have needed more than one anchor ..... unless I thought I would really need it.

Then neighbors be damned.

I last proved that off St Michaels, Md one summer day when much of the rest of the fleet never foresaw the thunderstom wind shift coming and wound up dragging toward the rocky shoreline.

Of course I was there early and well away from others till more piled in later in the afternoon. If I came later and knew how I was going to anchor, I would have avoided the crowd.

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Old 12-30-2022, 07:13 PM   #22
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Just get an excellent oversized storm anchor and use it as your primary.
And remember that chain doesn't work while sitting in your locker - use it.
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Old 12-30-2022, 08:12 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Simi 60 View Post
Just get an excellent oversized storm anchor and use it as your primary.
And remember that chain doesn't work while sitting in your locker - use it.
Not possible in all anchorages.

I usually agree with one great anchor and chain....

But no tool in the world is the best for every job.

Flexibility is key.
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Old 12-30-2022, 08:26 PM   #24
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Not possible in all anchorages.

I usually agree with one great anchor and chain....

But no tool in the world is the best for every job.

Flexibility is key.
6+ years of full time cruising on this vessel and I am yet to find an anchorage where it doesn't work or ever have the want or need for a 2nd anchor out.

Not saying it could never happen but I would be interested in hearing a scenario where it would.

I do have a selection of metal lumps passing themselves off as anchors (ploughs) and a decent sized super Sarca as spares
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Old 12-30-2022, 11:13 PM   #25
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Routinely will put two anchors out off the bow, 180 degrees apart to limit swing in tight anchorages (yes if other vessels are involved, watch the swing with respect to those vessels). As far as the Armageddon anchoring, off Tehuanipec, Mx, with winds gusting over 100mph, steady 60-70mph (luckily coming off the beach) we used 3 anchors, 2 danforth and a CQR in a fan. Held for 2 days until winds abated to move on. Wind never shifted nor would it. So, there is a different answer for every situation. Have to survey the situation.
I use two anchors quite frequently as SoCal island anchorages are often tight, but always one off the bow & one off the stern. I've never heard of two off the bow 180deg apart - why would you do that rather than a bow/stern setup?
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Old 12-31-2022, 05:35 AM   #26
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Lots of different boating techniques based on region and personal needs/experience.

Bahamian moor - usually used in narrow, tide reversing channels where touching the sides of rock would be bad. Sometime they are lined with mangrove trees.

https://www.anchoring.com/blogs/anch...rs-off-the-bow
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Old 12-31-2022, 06:49 AM   #27
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Lots of different boating techniques based on region and personal needs/experience.

Bahamian moor - usually used in narrow, tide reversing channels where touching the sides of rock would be bad. Sometime they are lined with mangrove trees.

https://www.anchoring.com/blogs/anch...rs-off-the-bow
Thanks and yes I have heard and used the Bahamian moor, but what I am not sure is why put two anchors off the bow? This just allows for the two rhodes to tangle or wind up with each other? Why not put the second anchor off the stern. This is why in a previous post I asked about putting real anchoring setups (i.e. winch, anchor roller and rhode storage) on the stern and why so few if any boats do so? Is there something inherently dangerous or problematic of using a stern anchor?
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Old 12-31-2022, 07:43 AM   #28
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Thanks and yes I have heard and used the Bahamian moor, but what I am not sure is why put two anchors off the bow? This just allows for the two rhodes to tangle or wind up with each other? Why not put the second anchor off the stern. This is why in a previous post I asked about putting real anchoring setups (i.e. winch, anchor roller and rhode storage) on the stern and why so few if any boats do so? Is there something inherently dangerous or problematic of using a stern anchor?
The forced exerted by a lot of current or wave surge can be very much more than on the bow. It can make retrieving the anchor nearly impossible as I have experienced once in a relatively calm, low current and small second anchor situation. So unless I am sure of future conditions and bottom or for short term, I would rarely anchor from the stern.

But that is a personal decision for each and every time you contemplate anchoring from the stern....not saying don't do it...just understand the ramifications.

The first 2 responses in your last post on the subject pretty well summed it up.

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...ors-65758.html
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Old 12-31-2022, 07:30 PM   #29
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Stern Anchoring

Of course anchoring is very specific to the types of conditions that the boater might expect to see. Here in the pacific north west we often encounter crowded anchorages that require "stern tying". I.e some type of line run from the stern of the boat to a firm attachment ashore (a tree, rock or installed hook. I've come across a fellow who boats extensively along the swedish south west coast in the archipelago. He has perfected the use of the stern anchor for use in his locale. Here's a link to his YouTube channel. I'm always impressed at how he maneuvers his boat in Tight quarters and skinny water.

https://m.youtube.com/@MyBoatandMylife

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Old 12-31-2022, 07:54 PM   #30
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I don't think any of us have not had that episode with the novice anchor. I plead guilty not being born an anchor expert, didn't even know the concept of scope when I started anchoring at age 10. But after 2 years swinging only on the hook cruising from Ca. to Panama and back, you learn to become an expert or you lose your boat. There are as many "special" circumstances to anchoring where the rules don't apply as there are members to TF. There are times when the ol' CQR that you use day in and day out won't hold and you have to pull out the dusty danforth. There are times 2 and even 3 anchors are totally appropriate. Off Costa Rica, I wouldn't leave the boat unless two anchors where out. Same with the channel in La Paz Baja before there were any marinas. Normally, that ol' trusty one anchor fits the bill.
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Old 12-31-2022, 08:22 PM   #31
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The thread immediately strayed to STORM while the original poster never mentioned the conditions. I have deployed two anchors off the bow in "normal conditions" in a tidal river with reversing currents. So there's a situation. Another is when I needed the boat kept clear of the narrow river channel because to swig was to get in the way of a towboat, and I used a stern anchor. Situation 2. I am not opposed to the use of two anchors, both of suitable size for whatever conditions because do you really want to put all your eggs into one shackle, I mean basket.

While generally opposed to generalizations, I firmly believe that most here could not successfully use the engine(s) to lessen the strain on the ground tackle in a REAL storm because the boats tend to wander all over meaning you will end up with zero viz trying to make sense of a spinning compass and the boat's centerline relationship with the anchor(s). You can do more harm with engine power pulling in the wrong direction and side load a working set of ground tackle and/or spin the tackle into the prop(s).

I for one do not ever intend to have my boat and me in such a situation. I hide whatever boat I own in hurricane holes with five or six anchors and me ELSEWHERE.
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Old 12-31-2022, 09:21 PM   #32
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Growing up my dad always ran 2 anchors. One was called the "lunch hook" and the other the "overnighter". It was a beast and he also had a weight he could attach ( kellet ? ) Since we didn't have a windlass I was always glad when we depolyed the lunch hook because it was significantly lighter and easier to raise. I think it makes sense to have a lighter duty set of ground tackle when it's short term on a calm day, as long as you keep an eye to the weather.
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