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Old 01-12-2021, 02:11 AM   #21
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Port Orford is really not a viable stop. Yes, there is a dock but it is really for prepping boats to be lifted out of the water.

Weather windows can be unpredictable. Usually if you have a 7 day window you donít want to waste it going in and out of port. Usually you just run around the clock. However, if you donít mind spending the money on fuel you can cover a lot of ground with our 18 hour long days and get a good night sleep.
That's why I didn't expand on it or stop there but as an emergency stop if needed, it's an option.
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Old 01-12-2021, 02:40 AM   #22
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As a commercial fisherman, I've been up and down the coast many times. Fort Bragg is easy to get in and out of except in bad weather. I never found it bad enough to worry about the state of the tide. Many years ago there was a big underwater rock at the mouth, but that was blasted in the 1960s. The rock is where the bad stories come from.

You get a better ride in 1000 fathoms or better. In shallow water and close to shore, there's a ground swell where the waves get steeper and closer together as the bottom comes up. I usually run about 25 miles off the coast. Most of the major points like Cape Mendocino and Point Arena have bigger waves close in. Cape Mendocino has some big marine canyons whose currents can react with the tide and quickly make big waves. It's a good point to be 15+ miles out unless it's a flat day.
There's several places you can anchor, but it's mostly fishermen that use them and it takes the right weather.
The spring and summer weather is usually 5+ days of strong NW winds followed by about 5 days of good sea conditions.

www.windy.com is handy in predicting wind and wave conditions.
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Old 01-12-2021, 04:33 AM   #23
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As long as your trip is dawdling vs a delivery, if your library does not already have Don and Reanne Douglass' cruising guide to the Pacific Coast, get it. Good price at Landfall too -

https://www.landfallnavigation.com/e...SABEgIY1PD_BwE

Peter
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Old 01-12-2021, 05:16 PM   #24
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Being a new trawler owner based in Portland too, I've plotted that trip using my iPad navigation apps. My excursion is coming but a few years out though.

Given decent weather, favorable tides, and summer sunlight it looks to me like there's enough places to tuck in so that you could be in a harbor every night.
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Old 01-12-2021, 05:45 PM   #25
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Being a new trawler owner based in Portland too, I've plotted that trip using my iPad navigation apps. My excursion is coming but a few years out though.

Given decent weather, favorable tides, and summer sunlight it looks to me like there's enough places to tuck in so that you could be in a harbor every night.
You certainly can. But timing tides, currents, and fuel docks plus the added distance in/out becomes a challenge and really rule the trip. The winds build until late afternoon so you're invariably arriving in windy conditions. And frankly, nighttime is generally more settled weather.

So while it can be done, it looks better on paper than reality. But certainly people do it all the time. But in my opinion, you give up a lot of benefit to have the comfort of being tied to a dock at night. Most of the marinas are commercial and don't have a nearby restaurant or really much at all (Eureka is a notable exception).

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Old 01-12-2021, 09:28 PM   #26
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You certainly can. But timing tides, currents, and fuel docks plus the added distance in/out becomes a challenge and really rule the trip. The winds build until late afternoon so you're invariably arriving in windy conditions. And frankly, nighttime is generally more settled weather.

So while it can be done, it looks better on paper than reality. But certainly people do it all the time. But in my opinion, you give up a lot of benefit to have the comfort of being tied to a dock at night. Most of the marinas are commercial and don't have a nearby restaurant or really much at all (Eureka is a notable exception).

Peter
Great thoughts.
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Old 01-12-2021, 10:04 PM   #27
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So while it can be done, it looks better on paper than reality. But certainly people do it all the time. But in my opinion, you give up a lot of benefit to have the comfort of being tied to a dock at night. Most of the marinas are commercial and don't have a nearby restaurant or really much at all (Eureka is a notable exception).

Peter
This is a comment on what is there not a disagreement with what was posted above.

Garibaldi- a snack/coffee shop at marina. Anything more takes an Uber.
Newport- I donít recall anything with in walking distance but very good food by Uber
Winchester- crab sandwich shop close by. Everything else a long Uber
Bandon- several sandwich shops close by. Better food a long walk.
Brookings- donít remember anything within walking. I like the town.
Crescent City- hotels have restaurants just a short walk.
Eureka- easy walk to good food
Fort Bragg- ?
Bodega Bay- crab sandwich by marina. Long walk to anything else.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:13 AM   #28
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Being new to the trawler world, the Washington and Oregon coasts on a costal capable boat is all new territory to me, it's unexplored and fresh, there are lots of whales to see and fish to catch and ... well dinner out isn't necessarily why I'd want to stay over night or even for a few days at one of these ports.

Ducking in to these costal ports from the ocean is a fresh experience to some of us, just as would be anchoring in Desolation sound.

The other newbie thing here is that any given crew may not be fully comfortable with long overnight passages.

My boat is in Port Townsend getting made shipshape. My first big hop will be from there to Portland. While lots of people have made this trip, I haven't and there's lots to see along the way. We'll be shaking down in the Straight of Juan de Fuca before going outside but the fact still remains that my hop from Neah Bay to Astoria will be this boats first open ocean test in a very long time.

I will research every viable refuge is for this trip, simply because it's new to me.

I know in time that newness will pass, but right now I fully understand the OP's interest.
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Old 01-13-2021, 06:21 AM   #29
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Being new to the trawler world, the Washington and Oregon coasts on a costal capable boat is all new territory to me, it's unexplored and fresh, there are lots of whales to see and fish to catch and ... well dinner out isn't necessarily why I'd want to stay over night or even for a few days at one of these ports.

Ducking in to these costal ports from the ocean is a fresh experience to some of us, just as would be anchoring in Desolation sound.

The other newbie thing here is that any given crew may not be fully comfortable with long overnight passages.

My boat is in Port Townsend getting made shipshape. My first big hop will be from there to Portland. While lots of people have made this trip, I haven't and there's lots to see along the way. We'll be shaking down in the Straight of Juan de Fuca before going outside but the fact still remains that my hop from Neah Bay to Astoria will be this boats first open ocean test in a very long time.

I will research every viable refuge is for this trip, simply because it's new to me.

I know in time that newness will pass, but right now I fully understand the OP's interest.
Mark - you are absolutely correct and my apologies to the OP. I reread his OP and clearly intent is to harbor hop. My advice was more "delivery" oriented. Harbor hopping does have a lot more logistics involved.

The Don and Reanne Douglass book I referenced is really the best cruising companion and will give details for each port and where the USCG stations are - the coasties are super helpful in giving bar conditions and will often offer an escort if you ask (often followed by a polite safety inspection).

Book URL is reattached for convenience ($35 is a pretty good deal)

https://www.waggonerguidebooks.com/s...ppaccoast.html

It doesn't take long to get the hang of the Pacific Coast. Weather north of Cape Mendocino is quite a bit different than South. The sea state forecasts can sound dreadful but are usually not as difficult as they sound, especially headed south.

Again, apologies for taking the OP in a different direction. Nothing wrong with harbor hopping of course.

Peter
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Old 01-13-2021, 08:50 AM   #30
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Thanks for the heads up on that guide, done bought one.

I see you are in Ensenada, I'm a bit jealous.

I do see your point very well on the logistics issues and don't disagree.
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Old 01-13-2021, 09:07 AM   #31
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Thanks for the heads up on that guide, done bought one.

I see you are in Ensenada, I'm a bit jealous.

I do see your point very well on the logistics issues and don't disagree.
Boat is in Ensenada having work done, I now live in Florida. Hopefully, boat will make it's way to Florida soon.

I met Don & Reanne Douglass, writer of the cruising guide I suggested, several times. Very interesting couple who had extensive sail cruising experience prior to purchasing their Nordhavn 40.

Reanne wrote an interesting book on their sail around Cape Horn that included a knock-down. She is candid about the pressure it put on their relationship - a good read for men with recalcitrant spouse. $5 for kindle version.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...api_tkin_p1_i4

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Old 01-13-2021, 09:47 AM   #32
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Mark,

I can offer some info on the Wa coast for your first hop. North to south. I've run that coast and crosses those bars more times than I can remember.

1st harbor of refuge is La Push. If you are planning on that one make sure you have a berth. It's a small harbor and if the fishing fleet is active, commercial or recreational, you may not have a berth. There is no place to anchor.

2nd is Grays Harbor / Westport. It's as far as river bars go an easy one. Not to say it is never hazardous, just easy to figure out. Westport is a big place, you'll almost never get skunked there. They started a year or two ago using the online reservation service. Being assured of getting a spot if you feel the need to duck in is not gong to happen. That said, I have ducked in, taken an open spot on the long dock with no fingers. Apologized the next morning, paid the fee and moved on.

Willapa. Don't go there. The entrance is dangerous, the channels constantly shift, the buoys when they are there may not mean anything. And once you're in there is almost no place to tie up.

Columbia River. Further up this thread is a good reference on the Columbia. Respect the Columbia. But if done in under the right conditions it's not bad at all.

For those and many coastal harbor entrances get some experience with your boat in following seas before heading down the coast. Central Juan de Fuca straits will often provide an opportunity to test you and your boat in following seas.
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Old 01-13-2021, 11:12 AM   #33
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Mark,

I can offer some info on the Wa coast for your first hop. North to south. I've run that coast and crosses those bars more times than I can remember.

1st harbor of refuge is La Push. If you are planning on that one make sure you have a berth. It's a small harbor and if the fishing fleet is active, commercial or recreational, you may not have a berth. There is no place to anchor.

2nd is Grays Harbor / Westport. It's as far as river bars go an easy one. Not to say it is never hazardous, just easy to figure out. Westport is a big place, you'll almost never get skunked there. They started a year or two ago using the online reservation service. Being assured of getting a spot if you feel the need to duck in is not gong to happen. That said, I have ducked in, taken an open spot on the long dock with no fingers. Apologized the next morning, paid the fee and moved on.

Willapa. Don't go there. The entrance is dangerous, the channels constantly shift, the buoys when they are there may not mean anything. And once you're in there is almost no place to tie up.

Columbia River. Further up this thread is a good reference on the Columbia. Respect the Columbia. But if done in under the right conditions it's not bad at all.

For those and many coastal harbor entrances get some experience with your boat in following seas before heading down the coast. Central Juan de Fuca straits will often provide an opportunity to test you and your boat in following seas.
Thanks. I do plan to practice during the shake down. I'm shaking myself down too.

The whole plan is in flux but our hope for this first trip is to bring along my wife's brother who has spent 37 years captaining ocean going tugs.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:49 PM   #34
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Mark,


1st harbor of refuge is La Push. If you are planning on that one make sure you have a berth. It's a small harbor and if the fishing fleet is active, commercial or recreational, you may not have a berth. There is no place to anchor.
I believe La Push is a native community and is therefore closed to non-natives as is Neah Bay, COVID thing. So La Push may not be an option.
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Old 01-13-2021, 01:59 PM   #35
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Yes, you are correct, La Push may still be closed to non natives due to covid. I was speaking to planning on La Push in a general sense. The point I was making is that unlike Neah Bay, Westport and the lower Columbia there is limited dock space and no good anchorages. Ducking into La Push for shelter you may find yourself headed right back out.
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Old 01-13-2021, 02:07 PM   #36
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Yes, you are correct, La Push may still be closed to non natives due to covid. I was speaking to planning on La Push in a general sense. The point I was making is that unlike Neah Bay, Westport and the lower Columbia there is limited dock space and no good anchorages. Ducking into La Push for shelter you may find yourself headed right back out.
I agree. Under "normal" circumstances La Push would be a weather hole.
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Old 01-13-2021, 03:41 PM   #37
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Yeah Covid is really messing with everyone's plans.

Port Angeles to Gray's or Astoria depending on the tides and such seems like the most likely hop in my case.
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Old 01-13-2021, 06:04 PM   #38
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Here is one more cruising guide possibility for you
http://georgebenson.us/sailing/
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Old 01-13-2021, 09:24 PM   #39
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As before, I thank you all for your replies. As was mentioned by Mark, we are planning to take our time and are curious about the journey as well as the destination. I have ordered the book referenced and thank you for that.
Colin
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Old 01-13-2021, 09:43 PM   #40
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As before, I thank you all for your replies. As was mentioned by Mark, we are planning to take our time and are curious about the journey as well as the destination. I have ordered the book referenced and thank you for that.
Colin
Wifey B: I found the stops mostly to be interesting. Small communities, history, nice harbors and places to explore in RIB. Most worth at least a day. Although we cruised about 20 knots and didn't really need fuel stops or pump outs, we turned the trip into a two week trip and it was very enjoyable. If it's somewhere we cruise regularly, we'll skip the towns and scenery, but when it's somewhere we may not get back to for years, we make a point to have the experience and connect with the locations.
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