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Old 07-17-2019, 07:34 AM   #41
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Here is a new one which is wider and actually fit the teak deck tightly.
Nice!
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Old 07-17-2019, 10:12 AM   #42
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that looks nice . i hope i can make mine look decent . i don't know how much i can up size i was planing to go up just enough to clean up the hole through the deck . i also have to replace the anchor locker floor and the lower portion of the forward bulkhead (small and hidden by the berth) . i'm not at the boat but i found this pic on my phone .the damage is below the deck and it very bad below the anchor locker floor. the cross brace is gone .
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:25 AM   #43
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I don't know why I was picturing something smaller when you gave me the specs - but I'd not be overly concerned about using Douglas fir if there was no better choice (i.e. white oak or locust).

Not sure how you are securing it where is passes through the deck. On wooden boats we use cedar wedges driven in and cut flush with the deck to prevent movement under load. It's a pretty slick system.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:23 PM   #44
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I don't know why I was picturing something smaller when you gave me the specs - but I'd not be overly concerned about using Douglas fir if there was no better choice (i.e. white oak or locust).

Not sure how you are securing it where is passes through the deck. On wooden boats we use cedar wedges driven in and cut flush with the deck to prevent movement under load. It's a pretty slick system.
The way I secured mine, I used a piece of galvanized angle iron. Ran a SS lag into the post thru the iron.
Other side of angle iron has a SS lag into the framing.
The bottom of the post sits in a teak notched out pocket, with a PT 2x4 on the bottom holds up all the teak floor planking.

Here is a picture showing the old post and you can see the angle too.
Its very solid. The angle iron does nothing except keep post from pulling up.
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:50 PM   #45
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Here is a picture showing the old post and you can see the angle too. Its very solid.
sdowney - what wood is yours made out of?

BTW - my wife is from Poquoson.
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Old 07-17-2019, 02:59 PM   #46
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For the Samson post, Stainless Steel would look awesome and can be made much stronger than wood.
Find a SS fabricator and get it made to your exact specifications.

If choosing between Cedar and Fir, Fir is never used for strength in home construction, just for decks, wall coverings or decorative exposed beams. Fir is specified for its strength in supporting beams, etc. Using the same logic, use Fir for your Samson Post.
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Old 07-17-2019, 04:05 PM   #47
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sdowney - what wood is yours made out of?

BTW - my wife is from Poquoson.
The rears, one is made of Ash, other is oak.
Forward one is a superb piece of tight grain old growth pine.

They are not too hard to replace on my boat. I can cut them out of larger wood on my table saw. The rear ones actually were skids, part of a pallet holding machinery or something heavy for transport, and were free.
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Old 07-18-2019, 07:26 AM   #48
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Ash? I've never used ash on a boat - but it's certainly a strong wood for it's weight. Does it hold up to weather? If so, that might be a good choice for the OP if it's available.

I've used it in projects where strength was critical and it's a decent wood to work with.
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Old 07-18-2019, 07:58 AM   #49
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Ash? I've never used ash on a boat - but it's certainly a strong wood for it's weight. Does it hold up to weather? If so, that might be a good choice for the OP if it's available.

I've used it in projects where strength was critical and it's a decent wood to work with.
As long as it is well sealed, ASH is a good very strong boat wood to use, and as long as you can replace the wood in the future without extreme trouble. It is not as rot resistant as a white oak. But its better than pine.

I would not use ash for buried structural components deep in the bilge, where it will get wet with the rain and not be dry. Much of how durable wood is on a wood boat is the wood type, but also how it is made and where it is in the boat. Just pieces of wood screwed together invites rot.

The Emerald Ash Borer is a severe threat to the very existence of ash trees. I have heard in a few decades, Ash trees may be extinct. That bug is not native here. Sad if the Ash tree is gone.

https://www.americanforests.org/maga...r-ash-goodbye/
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Old 07-18-2019, 09:14 AM   #50
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Ash? I've never used ash on a boat - but it's certainly a strong wood for it's weight. Does it hold up to weather? If so, that might be a good choice for the OP if it's available.

I've used it in projects where strength was critical and it's a decent wood to work with.
I walked through a catamaran that was paneled with ash and liked it. It was a very light and airy color and opened up the space. Of course, this was on the inside, not the exterior of the boat.
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