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Old 08-15-2017, 02:05 PM   #21
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I figure that I spend about 200 hours each spring getting the boat ready for the season.
See my earlier comment about artwork or work boat.

Timber work boats often get slipped, spot caulked, antifouled and a coat of paint and are back working inside a week.
In my opinion there is no place for varnish or bristol finish anything on boats that get used full time.

All our varnish work had been seriously deteriorated which was a big part of why we got her so cheap.
Sanded that $hit off and re painted in self priming solid colours and see you in several years time, just like a timber house.

That lack of ooh ahh shiney does not affect liveability or seaworthiness one iota.
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:31 PM   #22
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Simi,
The reason I don't do that is I feel resale will tank.
Hope you did yours so it's strip-able for the next owner.
Some places on my boat are coated w house paint .. latex.
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Old 08-15-2017, 04:33 PM   #23
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I recently considered buying a wood boat that was drop dead gorgeous with lots of brite work. Came to my senses, realized how many hours annually it would take to maintain, and am still looking. It was 12' long.

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Old 08-15-2017, 11:21 PM   #24
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Simi,
The reason I don't do that is I feel resale will tank.
Hope you did yours so it's strip-able for the next owner.
Some places on my boat are coated w house paint .. latex.
I doubt resale could tank any lower than what we paid.

Varnish was shot, timber veneers are stained/bleached , some were delaminating so needed removing/replacing, or removing and painting as we have done. Simple, long lasting and cost effective.

Solid merbau rails would have needed extensive sanding losing thickness or simply sanding and painting in a similar solid colour to what they would have been originally.

We are using exterior hi UV and mould inhibited acrylic/latex from deck up (15 year guarantee on houses, been 10 on my own place and still looks fine) and on the hull use industrial gloss enamel, no pictures of shiny yachts on any of them.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:00 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Simi 60 View Post
I doubt resale could tank any lower than what we paid.

Varnish was shot, timber veneers are stained/bleached , some were delaminating so needed removing/replacing, or removing and painting as we have done. Simple, long lasting and cost effective.

Solid merbau rails would have needed extensive sanding losing thickness or simply sanding and painting in a similar solid colour to what they would have been originally.

We are using exterior hi UV and mould inhibited acrylic/latex from deck up (15 year guarantee on houses, been 10 on my own place and still looks fine) and on the hull use industrial gloss enamel, no pictures of shiny yachts on any of them.
I agree!

1965 dad purchased a 1950 38' raised deck sport fisher with fly bridge. She was a one-off woody of incredible construction. Interior varnished mahogany was to die for and still in pretty good condition. Problem was... she had been owned by a guy for the last 12 years that let her exterior fall to ruin, cosmetically. Her salon and all deck areas [huge frond deck] were varnish that had simply received coat after coat after coat with no prep nor clear knowledge of application.

As you - Dad got her at a great price. He and I spent the first year stripping off all the poorly maintained exterior varnish [man, Jabsco paint remover can sting if not careful - lol].


We painted her nice color with the best paints in areas stripped and she became a great family boat for over a decade; occasional paint maintenance required.

Exterior bright work, done correctly and maintained to a "T" looks great. If it requires you/me to do it all ourselves - then, IMO It Is Big PIA... when we could be using the boat out and about for enjoyment!

Different strokes for different folks!
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:21 AM   #26
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It's "wood boats" not wooden boats.

Wooden shoes .. wooden toys. Wooden thus is used disrespectfully as in substandard. In the day wooden toys meant cheap toys. Good toys were made out of metal not wood.

A wood boat being superior to a plastic boat should be given the obvious respect due. Think of a dozen or so plastic toys scattered about in front yards across the country. No respect. Of course this applies mostly to wood boats of superior design, materials and construction.
Yo, Eric - Prove my point!

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Old 08-16-2017, 07:22 AM   #27
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1. Does your boat's bottom planks shrink so much in one cold winter that when launched she would not swell soon enough for bilge pumps to keep her afloat without doing as you say - I can motor directly to the marina, but the pumps will take 6-8 hours to slow down. My pumps are adequate to keep up, but it is much nicer if they don't have to run so much. And yes in the cold dry winters here in Maine the hull planks do shrink quite a lot.

2. Why does your engine need annual realignment? "...
- My boat is 81 years old and a bit more flexible than when it was new. Realigning the engine only takes an hour and is worth the trouble.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:05 AM   #28
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my 38' 1981 CheerMan Sedan trawler is no less work than the 1963 34' Chris Craft Constellation I sold. Case in point. Chris had her hull and superstructure painted every five to six years. And the bright- work varnished every other year. Chris always looked perfect. CheerMan has faded gelcoat that is waxed annually [more work that painting!!!] and the teak needs attention each year. Engines each require routine maintenance annually. The bottom gets painted either way.
I still believe if you buy a wood boat in better than average condition from a good builder it is no more work than a glass boat.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:12 AM   #29
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Yo, Eric - Prove my point!

Email today from Waggoner Cruising Guide, which I subscribe to:

Wooden Boat Festival

"Wooden Boat Festival, Namgis Culture, Potable Water...is it safe?"
Art,
Not out to prove anything. Just expressing my preference for "wood boats" over "wooden boats". But if you want to take it to court most people call wood boats wooden boats. If you think that proves something then sit down and feel warm and fuzzy with it.

As far as getting into the noun thing either gets the job done and names or identifies the kind of boat. But IMO how are you naming the boats better by extending the word wood to wooden .. gets you nowhere. The extra syllable in wooden dosn't make the meaning of the word more clear or better in any way.

I like wood boat because it seems more respectful. I'm quite sure I picked that up on the floats in Alaska. "Wood" boat seems more common there. The Alaska thing could easily be a misconception though.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:32 AM   #30
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TDunn wrote;
"2. Why does your engine need annual realignment? "... - My boat is 81 years old and a bit more flexible than when it was new. Realigning the engine only takes an hour and is worth the trouble."

I think that all wood boats regardless of age need realignment after being hauled out for a time. But much more so if alignment was done or changed while hauled. And I think it's a result of the midsection of boats having greater volume below the WL and thus greater lift than the ends. The boat becomes "hogged" in this way also.

So if you block up a boat on the hard "straight" and align the engine to the shaft and then put her in the water the ends (especially the bow) will droop or settle deeper in the water compared to when on the hard. Alignment gone. But for a short time if you leave the alignment the way it was when in the water one can haul and relaunch w/o much if any realignment needed. Unless your boat is very old as in TDunn's case.
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Old 08-16-2017, 01:59 PM   #31
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A boater hasn't lived until they have taken a chainsaw to a 1' by 1' by 20' hunk of deadwood complete with bronze lags.
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Old 08-16-2017, 03:10 PM   #32
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A boater hasn't lived until they have taken a chainsaw to a 1' by 1' by 20' hunk of deadwood complete with bronze lags.
Ouch! Nasty!!!
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Old 08-16-2017, 03:38 PM   #33
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It's "wood boats" not wooden boats.
In Australia and New Zealand they are "timber" boats. After living here for 35 years, its one of the few Aussie terms I haven't picked up. It is still wood to me, although I occasionally use wooden as well.
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Old 08-16-2017, 05:39 PM   #34
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In Australia and New Zealand they are "timber" boats. After living here for 35 years, its one of the few Aussie terms I haven't picked up. It is still wood to me, although I occasionally use wooden as well.
Put a copy in the "what's a trawler" and "salon vs saloon", etc...etc file....
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Old 08-16-2017, 06:34 PM   #35
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AusCan,
Yup "timber" boats works for me same as wood.
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Old 08-16-2017, 06:45 PM   #36
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AusCan,
Yup "timber" boats works for me same as wood.
But... ya just don't like the term wooden. go figure!!
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Old 08-17-2017, 11:39 AM   #37
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I want to thank everyone for their input. The information really helped me in my decision making. I think for my needs, fiberglass is a better choice.
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:23 PM   #38
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A boater hasn't lived until they have taken a chainsaw to a 1' by 1' by 20' hunk of deadwood complete with bronze lags.


Yeah, and that 1' X 1' hunk of deadwood with bronze anything most likely became available after hundreds of 2" fasteners rotted away to make piece parts. And rotted fasteners are wooden boat killers. Worse, they hide in dangerous places
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:35 PM   #39
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Putty bugs. Fasteners fine.
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Old 08-18-2017, 07:37 PM   #40
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Being totally (almost) ignorant on the subject, I'd say keep the boat in the water, and try not to have the hull dry out.
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