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Old 04-27-2017, 12:37 PM   #1
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Taiwanese Trawler nonskid

I'm rebedding our forehatch. I've got it nearly clean enough to think about refinishing the Teak, paint outside and varnish inside.

The Teak coaming is apparently in fine shape. I've removed 34 years of exterior paints (no varnish remaining) and many applications of various sealants between the coaming and the house top.

The interior of the coaming is about 3/4" thick, glued to an exterior piece of trim, forming, I presume, an 'L'-shaped piece of wood on the four sides. The four sides are glued together and the interior corner has a nice solid Teak cove. I presume 'L'-shaped because there are bungs concealing fasteners which affix the coaming to the fiberglass below. I presume the housetop is a 1" oa thick balsa cored structure like the decks and saloon top.

There are 6 'patches' of raised nonskid on the house top and similar raised patches on the flybridge. Those on the house top are caulked around their perimeters and have been painted several times. The whole surface has been painted as well.

The paint on the nonskid is in poor condition and the sealants have shrunk under the paint making an unsightly mess. The flybridge patches of nonskid look fine, have not been sealed, but have also been painted.

So the question of the day is: what is this nonskid? It appears as though it was glued down to the fiberglass. It appears as though it has lifted at the edges so that a PO attacked it with his caulk gun. I dug a bit along one edge and it appears to be a thin patterned layer of fiberglass glued down to a layer of something else and then glued down to the fiberglass deck/housetop. Alternative is that it is actually moulded in with the 'glass but the sharp change in shape and the 3/16" +/- thickness would suggest otherwise. More often, it seem to me, that the nonskid is sprayed on, glued on in a thinnish layer, or moulded in almost flush.

All this would be of no real interest now except that I will want to replace the run of caulk where the nonskid seems to have been fitted around the coaming. There is no damage to the overhead below, nor to the Teak surround below.

(I'd post a pic but I forgot the camera-computer cord.)
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Old 04-27-2017, 12:52 PM   #2
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Old 04-28-2017, 05:02 AM   #3
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Treadmaster might be a good replacement.

Treadmaster: The Original Anti-Slip Deck Covering

https://www.treadmaster.co.uk/


May 5, 2016 - Manufactured in the UK, the Treadmaster range has been the benchmark for anti-slip deck coverings for over forty years.‎Treadmaster M-TecSelf Adhesive Grip PadsDeck Templating GuideAbout us
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Old 04-28-2017, 06:35 AM   #4
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I believe the non skid "panels" are fiberglassed onto the cabin top.
Mine are done that way.
I did some repairs on mine using mold pieces that will duplicate the non skid pattern.
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Old 04-28-2017, 08:42 AM   #5
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Thanks, Jay. That so, then my intent is to rout a neat edge to the piece of nonskid that now is fitted around the forehatch. I can then clean up the house top fiberglass and run a neat bead of sealant (that I don't think I really need) around the Teak coaming. (Note to self: bring router and bits next week)
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Old 04-28-2017, 11:43 AM   #6
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Non-Skid Mold Patterns | Gibco Flex-Mold
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Old 04-28-2017, 12:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Simmons View Post
Yes thank you. That is where I got mine.
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Old 04-29-2017, 10:04 AM   #8
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Here are some pics of the past week's fun-in-progress.

An overview. The plywood panel, strongback, and Spanish windlass keeps the mess off of the Admiral's berth below. A couple close ups of the nonskid and the coaming before I removed the paint. I plan to cut the nonskid neatly away from the coaming and clean up the mess before sealing and painting.
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Old 05-04-2017, 04:12 PM   #9
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I successfully chipped the nonskid panels off. I cut a neat line with a router. Ground the weak filler/polyester/adhesive off. Almost crumbly, brittle, low strength. When I got down to the fiberglass, there was no gel coat and it was a bubbly mess. Ground it clean enough and will fill with epoxy faring compound before painting.

The nonskid was, as reported by others, a very thin layer of gelcoat in a nonskid mold and a very thin layer of chop. About 1/16" thick total. Just strong enough to walk over to a boat.


The pic is today, with the epoxy filler done. You can see how I cut the nonskid back so that it matches the remaining areas. (Sure would be nice to be able to turn these pics right side up!)
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Old 05-04-2017, 08:02 PM   #10
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some use this: Plaskolite 4 ft. x 2 ft. Suspended Light Ceiling Panel-1199233A - The Home Depot to mold their non-skid.
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Old 05-04-2017, 08:13 PM   #11
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Our decks including the non skid was in pretty poor condition. Our non skid was a small diamond pattern molded into the glass. I sanded the nonskid off and painted with Kiwigrip. It is certainly nonskid. We are launching our boat next Wednesday so I will find out shortly how hard it will be to keep clean. I have some Woody Wax that I will apply before we launch to help in the cleaning.
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