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Old 05-26-2021, 12:37 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by socalrider View Post
Thanks - that sounds like an interference fit coupling? I'll let you know if I need the driveshaft work done - still holding out hope I can resolve this in the water with pry bars, blocks, c-clamps, mallets and beer. I can turn the shaft by hand at least, so I think if I remove the coupling and re-seat it fully onto the shaft I should be able to lever off the back side of the coupling face to draw the shaft up. I could also get some oversized bolts and use them to draw the shaft up to the transmission.

It sounds pretty easy when I write it out like that...
How will you grip and then draw the shaft forward into the flange.
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Old 05-26-2021, 01:16 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by socalrider View Post
Thanks - that sounds like an interference fit coupling? I'll let you know if I need the driveshaft work done - still holding out hope I can resolve this in the water with pry bars, blocks, c-clamps, mallets and beer. I can turn the shaft by hand at least, so I think if I remove the coupling and re-seat it fully onto the shaft I should be able to lever off the back side of the coupling face to draw the shaft up. I could also get some oversized bolts and use them to draw the shaft up to the transmission.

It sounds pretty easy when I write it out like that...
If your shaft is 1 3/4" then I might have some tools that could help. I've struggled with mine quite a bit and have a variety of things I've gathered and used, but it's all pretty specific to 1 3/4".

Not an interference fit, a tight sliding fit. The pin that is driven through on mine is a light press fit similar to what you'd use to put bearing in a hub, can be done with tapping. The tolerances with couplers and shafts are very close, I don't think any of the initial fitting work can be done in situ, but it can be later disassembled and reassembled with the same parts that are fit to work together. This may not hold true so much on lower power applications and smaller sizes where the forces aren't as great.
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Old 05-26-2021, 01:18 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Soo-Valley View Post
How will you grip and then draw the shaft forward into the flange.
Yes this is going to be the hard part. I've used a shaft collar to grip, but that's going a different direction. Be very careful with the face of the drive flange, you DO NOT want to ding/nick/deface it on the surface that mounts to the transmission, can cause all sorts of issues.
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Old 05-26-2021, 01:28 AM   #24
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How will you grip and then draw the shaft forward into the flange.
Plan:
1. Head dunk to check for shaft clearance from prop to strut
2. Remove a single coupling pinch bolt to check for dimple.
3. If sufficient clearance and no dimple, remove PSS set screws & ensure I can move the ring on the prop shaft
5. Remove second pinch bolt and unbolt coupling from transmission. Push the shaft aft a few inches carefully w/ pry bar if necessary (minding the PSS coupling & not marring the mating surfaces). Remove coupling from shaft, clean & light oil on everything, re-assemble. The coupling *should* slide right on and bottom out if everything's clean and de-burred.
6. Carefully torque (new, grade 8) pinch bolts, alternating.
7. Draw the coupling flange to the transmission flange with oversize bolts and/or pry bars operating on the back face of the shaft coupling.

I did many of these steps when replacing the drivesaver (at anchor off Catalina) last year by myself with minimal tools so I'm pretty confident I can move the shaft fore and aft. I'm more worried about the coupling being seized to the shaft - there's some rust visible in the keyway in the photo.
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Old 05-26-2021, 02:52 AM   #25
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Spacers were needed because the shafts are not long enough to slide back with enough shaft left to mount the props.
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Originally Posted by Soo-Valley View Post
Jack, please expand on why you did not just remove the broken drivesaver and couple together the shaft as it was before DS was installed. You are talking about these that fit in between tranny and shaft.
https://www.globecomposite.com/drivesaver
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Old 05-26-2021, 02:54 AM   #26
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Did your DriveSaver actually fracture? If not, it did not save anything..
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Iím hesitant to eliminate the DriveSavers as one saved my bacon last year when I wrapped a mooring line on my prop! But I have heard of these issues.
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Old 05-26-2021, 07:04 AM   #27
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Spacers were needed because the shafts are not long enough to slide back with enough shaft left to mount the props.
This is the spacer.Click image for larger version

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Old 05-26-2021, 07:08 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by socalrider View Post
Iím hesitant to eliminate the DriveSavers as one saved my bacon last year when I wrapped a mooring line on my prop! But I have heard of these issues.
This is my fractured Globe DriveSaver. No fracture, no saved bacon.Click image for larger version

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Old 05-26-2021, 07:13 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catalinajack View Post
This is the spacer.Attachment 118026
Thanks for explaining your case. Seems your shaft length needs a spacer as not enough shaft to eliminate it.
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Old 05-26-2021, 11:00 AM   #30
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Did your DriveSaver actually fracture? If not, it did not save anything..
Yes - as the line wrapped around the shaft between the prop and strut, it pulled the driveshaft aft. The drivesaver's bolts pulled out of the rubber disc, allowing the transmission shaft to rotate independently from the coupling. I'm not sure what the failure mode would have been without the drivesaver, but I bet it would not have been pretty - probably something inside the transmission, maybe a bent strut. This was day 2 of a 14 day cruise, so I was pretty grateful.

Note - this incident was on the starboard engine; the shaft separation issue discussed in the original post is on the port side.

Edit: found a pic
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Failed drivesaver.jpg  
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Old 05-26-2021, 11:18 AM   #31
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Again, make sure that you have enough shaft to pull it forward. You donít want the prop pulled against the back of the strut and be rubbing on the strut. You need some shaft sticking out behind the strut so cooling water can exit the cutlass bearing.
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Old 05-26-2021, 11:21 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by socalrider View Post
Plan:
1. Head dunk to check for shaft clearance from prop to strut
2. Remove a single coupling pinch bolt to check for dimple.
3. If sufficient clearance and no dimple, remove PSS set screws & ensure I can move the ring on the prop shaft
5. Remove second pinch bolt and unbolt coupling from transmission. Push the shaft aft a few inches carefully w/ pry bar if necessary (minding the PSS coupling & not marring the mating surfaces). Remove coupling from shaft, clean & light oil on everything, re-assemble. The coupling *should* slide right on and bottom out if everything's clean and de-burred.
6. Carefully torque (new, grade 8) pinch bolts, alternating.
7. Draw the coupling flange to the transmission flange with oversize bolts and/or pry bars operating on the back face of the shaft coupling.

I did many of these steps when replacing the drivesaver (at anchor off Catalina) last year by myself with minimal tools so I'm pretty confident I can move the shaft fore and aft. I'm more worried about the coupling being seized to the shaft - there's some rust visible in the keyway in the photo.
Sounds like a good plan. I've spent far too many hours struggling with shafts, couplers and stuffing boxes to envy any of that work. I'm afraid I've got a bit more to go prior to launch as well. If the coupling doesn't slide right on in step 5, I've got a shaft collar in 1 3/4" that can be used to help draw it into the coupler with some all-thread, nuts, washers and various other bits, depending on your space constraints. If you have a different size shaft, the collars are easily available on McMaster's web site.

I'm going to take a guess and assume there was a reason someone got lazy and didn't assemble it correctly and you'll find the reason somewhere along the way in this job.
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Old 05-26-2021, 11:31 AM   #33
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Here is a picture of the shaft collar in action. I was trying to remove a stuffing box that was extremely stuck. I used the shaft collar as a hardpoint to pull from, it clamps on the shaft and does not mar it. It could be used to pull on the drive coupler to pull it onto the shaft with appropriate hardware employed.



I made these horseshoe shaped pieces out of mild steel to straddle the shaft, butt up against the collar and provide places to use bolts/threaded rod to pull with.



I also have these commercially produced horseshoes that could be used for the same thing but have a larger overall size which might be more appropriate for pulling with in your case. These are part of my StrutPro kit which I bought to change cutlass bearings.

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Old 05-26-2021, 11:32 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
Again, make sure that you have enough shaft to pull it forward. You donít want the prop pulled against the back of the strut and be rubbing on the strut. You need some shaft sticking out behind the strut so cooling water can exit the cutlass bearing.
Thanks

Quote:
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I'm going to take a guess and assume there was a reason someone got lazy and didn't assemble it correctly and you'll find the reason somewhere along the way in this job.
Yeah, that's probably right unfortunately. If the shaft's just too short I can get a spacer made up.
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Old 05-26-2021, 11:54 AM   #35
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Yeah, that's probably right unfortunately. If the shaft's just too short I can get a spacer made up.[/QUOTE]

I got mine at Spurs. They did great work but not cheap. No affiliation. Sounds like you are going swimming...
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Old 05-28-2021, 05:11 AM   #36
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Some wee wedges made from ground screwdriver bits can be used, CAREFULLY, to open the splits in the coupling just enough to slide the coupling onto the shaft.

If the dimples in the shaft sides are in the wrong place the shaft may have to be pulled to correct it. Maybe the shaft is to short and they did not consider a machined spacer. The shaft end should be at the end of the bore hole in the coupling or close.

As the shaft end enters the solid part of the coupling is where you may need some pulling or pushing ability using a split collar , or two, and threaded rod.

I just went through this a month ago. My shaft needed straightening a bit and I ended up with a new coupling faced to the shaft and a new cutless bearing.

My boat was out of the water for this work. Made things much easier although still a lot of work.


I've mentioned this before but even with a dripless shaft seal water in the form of a VERY fine spray will enter the E.R. It is fine enough to travel causing rusting of nearby components.
I don't have a dripless so I cover my stuffing box with an old fender hacked into a cover which catches the mist so it drops into the bilge.

But I have seen the results of that mist at work even though the seals used were the same general type as the so called dripless. Consider a hacked fender cover and maybe stop/reduce the rusting of parts like the coupling.
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Old 05-28-2021, 02:25 PM   #37
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Update:

Back on the boat today; I went ahead and pulled a pinch bolt and indeed the shaft is dimpled. I took a closer look at the gap identified in the split with a bright light and feeler gage & found that it's not actually a gap - there's a ~1/4" deep hole drilled in the shaft right under the split, making it look like the shaft isn't fully engaged! So I'm not sure why that hole is there but it does look like the shaft's in its correct place.

I'm going to replace the pinch bolts on both couplings with fresh Zn-Al coated 7/16" grade 8 bolts, nuts & split washers & torque to proper spec, but otherwise I'm gonna leave this one alone. Sorry for the false alarm!
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Old 05-31-2021, 02:43 PM   #38
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Looking closely, I can see the line on the shaft where it was previously secured so it does look like it just slipped back.

I would follow your own thoughts on fixing it. Loosen, pull till it bottoms out, take a look at the space between the prop and the bearing - should match the other prop. Tighten to torque specs.

You might need to devise some way to get a little leverage to pull it through the bearing (loosen packing for example).

We had shaft savers on our DeFever 49 CPMY. They saved us more than a few times around the loop. We started from Houston and on our way, we wrapped a 2 inch hauser around the prop in Louisiana. Our Prop-Protector line cutters took a while of reverse and forward shifting before it cut the line.
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Old 05-31-2021, 02:48 PM   #39
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Better option than Drivesavers?

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Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
Our boat had Drivesavers on it. Too much vibration since we couldnít do a proper alignment. Replaced the Drivesavers with spacers from Spurs, no more vibration.

I installed a Drivesaver on my boat after seeing how a pair of transmissions can be blown apart by not having a break-apart joint between shafts and the power. $60,000 worth of replacement and parts throughout the engine room. If there is a better option than "nothing" I'm interested to hear more.
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Old 05-31-2021, 03:15 PM   #40
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Looking closely, I can see the line on the shaft where it was previously secured so it does look like it just slipped back.

............................
I saw that too and thought it was pulled forward after a drivesaver was removed but since no mention of one on other shaft dismissed the thought.
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