Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-06-2017, 02:19 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
ak-guy's Avatar
 
City: Gustavus, AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Troll Hunter
Vessel Model: Allweather
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 137
Sound Absorption in Pilothouse

I have reduced considerably the noise from my engine in various ways. My pilothouse ceiling is bare fiberglass (plywood core) and I would like to cover it with some kind of sound absorption material. There are no beams or stringers. What materials have you used and how effective was it? There is regular foam backed vinyl but it seems too thin to be effective. It would be good to have a surface that is somewhat resistant to damage and washable.
__________________
Advertisement

ak-guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 03:16 PM   #2
Guru
 
cardude01's Avatar
 
City: Victoria TX
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bijou
Vessel Model: 2008 Island Packet PY/SP
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,606
I would talk to this guy

Steve Moyer
Soundown
954 761-9188
www.soundown.com

I installed some of their lead sandwiched panels around my generator and it really helped.
__________________

cardude01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 03:31 PM   #3
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 8,754
We played around trying to reduce noise in our pilot house. What worked surprisingly well for us was just hanging a heavy fabric curtain at the top of the stairs going up into the pilot house from the saloon/galley area. I think it directly absorbed the sound before it got there. Our engine is pretty much centered under the saloon floor.
Larry M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 05:26 PM   #4
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,444
I lined Delfin with 1/4" additional cork before installing 2" coast guard Batts. It is a very good sound deadener in and of itself. www.jelinek.com
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 06:10 PM   #5
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,810
Some people use egg cartons... Seriously, stopping the sound before it leaves the engineroom works best. Lead sheeting on the inside of the engine room and foam on the outside.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 06:36 PM   #6
Guru
 
Keysdisease's Avatar
 
City: South Florida
Country: USA
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 740
What AK wants to do is reduce reverberation in the Pilot House, not reduce the transmission of engine noise from the engine room.

Covering it with just about anything soft will do the job, 1/2" of just about any soft foam covered in a thin vinyl (to allow noise transmission) will work, even 1/4" is good. The perforated vinyl headliners look very traditional and the perforations actually improve the absorption performance, but if anything wet ever gets though those holes and into the foam it will "bleed" if you touch it. That's why I prefer to give up some performance for a cleanable surface that's also a vapor barrier for the foam and will make it last longer.

It's actually more important to cover the hard surface than what you cover it with.




Quote:
Originally Posted by ak-guy View Post
I have reduced considerably the noise from my engine in various ways. My pilothouse ceiling is bare fiberglass (plywood core) and I would like to cover it with some kind of sound absorption material. There are no beams or stringers. What materials have you used and how effective was it? There is regular foam backed vinyl but it seems too thin to be effective. It would be good to have a surface that is somewhat resistant to damage and washable.
Keysdisease is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2017, 08:24 PM   #7
Guru
 
Irish Rambler's Avatar
 
City: NARBONNE
Country: FRANCE
Vessel Name: 'Snow Mouse.'
Vessel Model: BROOM FLYBRIDGE 42.
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,599
What I did was to ensure all mechanical pieces, engine mountings/engine/gearbox/shaft etc.are perfectly installed/aligned. If the air intake is attached directly to the engine then using a paper filter type air cleaner route it away from the engine and near to fresh air vent, don't forget to use reinforced hose that won't collapse from the suction, that will reduce engine intake roar by 30%.
I used a foam lead foam sandwich soundproofing with a wipe free surface called Quietlife to line the engine room and then I seated the floor bearers on a light foam.
That system worked perfectly well for me and hopefully it will for you.
Irish Rambler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2017, 05:57 AM   #8
Veteran Member
 
Tootles's Avatar
 
City: Leamington ON
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Tootles
Vessel Model: Nordic 26
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 59
I too can recommend that Steve Moyer at Soundown.com has a wealth of ideas and solutions

Jim
Tootles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2017, 06:07 AM   #9
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 20,503
Std in dirt housing is 3/4 inch thick fiberglass with a sound damping facing.

It will require battens or T strips to hold it in place.

Some will create a "dentist office" look, but the same material is available in planks pattern that is more shippy.

Sound is energy , so it takes some material thickness to absorb it.

My dream is a noise cancelling gadget that could simply be powered to absorb the noise.

A portable one for resturants would be great too!
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2017, 10:23 AM   #10
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,444
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
Std in dirt housing is 3/4 inch thick fiberglass with a sound damping facing.

It will require battens or T strips to hold it in place.

Some will create a "dentist office" look, but the same material is available in planks pattern that is more shippy.

Sound is energy , so it takes some material thickness to absorb it.

My dream is a noise cancelling gadget that could simply be powered to absorb the noise.

A portable one for resturants would be great too!
For Delfin's refit, sound deadening involved spraying the entire inside of the hull with sound deadening compound, then lining it with acoustical cork, then coast guard batts except in the ER where high density foam vinyl sandwich from Sounddown was used. In any case, she is very quiet.

Like you FF, I have wondered whether it would be possible to use similar technology to that in sound deadening head phones to generate specific wavelengths of sound to counter individual noises on a particular boat.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 06:58 AM   #11
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 20,503
"Like you FF, I have wondered whether it would be possible to use similar technology to that in sound deadening head phones to generate specific wavelengths of sound to counter individual noises on a particular boat."

The tech is cheap and robust enough that it is built into mufflers on high tech cars .

To get rid of the din in an eatery , I would even carry a Boom Box sized unit if it would work!
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 12:36 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
City: Texas
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 37' C&L Double Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 187
Some turboprop airplanes also have a system like that
Nopistn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2017, 02:46 AM   #13
Guru
 
Pgitug's Avatar
 
City: Punta Gorda, fl
Country: Usa
Vessel Name: Escapade
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37 2002
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,164
Sound Absorption in Pilothouse

Take a look at the ceilings installed in Nordic Tugs.
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1730.jpg
Views:	49
Size:	136.2 KB
ID:	69311
Pgitug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2017, 03:32 AM   #14
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 11,741
My builder did a decent job in reducing engine noise in living spaces. Ceilings are soft, and the floor above the engine compartment is several inches thick.
__________________

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×