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Old 12-06-2019, 10:25 PM   #21
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Simon,
At what frequency have you renewed bottom paint? And with what type, hard or ablative?
This will be a big switch for us moving from the river to POYC. I have a wet suit and hookah setup, thinking about diving at some interval. It's a bit cheaper.
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My last haulout was in 2010.

At that time, Sandpiper had 34 years of hard bottom paint on it's bottom. The bottom paint was falling off in sheets from the weight. The paint looked like it was 3/8" to 1/2" thick!

I scraped off the bottom paint to gel coat. When done, I had 4 garbage cans of scraped bottom paint that was so heavy, a fork lift was required to pick it up. Since I was down to the gel coat, decided to epoxy the bottom, even though Sandpiper did not have any blisters. The epoxy provides some benefits beside blister protection. It seals the gel coat from water intrusion and provides a primer/tie coat for the bottom paint. The first coat of bottom paint is applied to a still soft epoxy which binds the two together. I used Interlux Interprotect 2000 epoxy system.

I applied one coat of red Interlux Micron Extra ablative bottom paint and 4 coats of blue Micron Extra over the epoxy. After 9 years, the first red coat of bottom paint has not become visible yet.

I don't get barnacles on the hull at all. I get some barnacles on the bow thruster and a few spots on the keel shoe which is encapsulated in Interprotect 2000 and epoxy.

The biggest issue I experience is green slime and grass. I get the hull cleaned in June before we leave. By the end of the two month cruise, the bottom is covered in green slime. I get the bottom cleaned again in October. The slime also grows while the boat is in the boathouse, but not to the same extent as outside.

I was going on the dry grid at the YC every year to clean and paint the prop. Now that the grid is deemed unusable, I'm looking at different prop protecting schemes.

Not being able to use the grid really made the decision to try the Sonihull easier. If it keeps the prop clean, it would be worth the price.

On the next haul out, I plan on switching to Pettits Ultima SR40 or 60 Dual Biocide. Even though the Extra has prevented barnacles for 9 years, I will try the Petitt. Most ablative paint would last 9 years with 5 coats.

My goal is to go as long as possible between haulouts. Haulouts are expensive, time consuming and a lot of labor required in a short time period. I do my own bottom work. Every haulout require pressure washing, which washes away bottom paint that costs a couple hundred dollars per gallon. Wash away one coat - apply two.
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Old 12-12-2019, 06:39 AM   #22
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Great positive report. Any reason you chose your product over other manufacturers?

Reason I'm curious is that I sell that brand too and had difficulty choosing between it and the Sonihull. The desicion maker was price and and my past experiences with PYI, who happens to be located in the PNW.
I'm finishing a large refit in Ensenada south of San Diego and will splash this spring, then probably head to PNW, then south through Panama Canal and ultimately to Florida. Color me skeptical impact on galvanic corrosion is one question), but if you'd like to discuss a running test boat in a multitude of North American waters, might be interesting. Via PM
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Old 12-12-2019, 08:21 AM   #23
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I've been a dealer for Sonihull by NRG Marine - PYI is the US distributor and Ultra-SonicTec. I was unable to sell a single unit of either system because of buyer skepticism and no testimonials from PNW boaters./
Personally, testimonials are interesting but wouldn't get me over the line. If they did, I'd own an Algae-X. Everything I can find about ultrasonic anti-fouling is anecdotal. What would be interesting is to install the an ultrasonic system in one of two hulls of a catamaran and compare over time, preferably a few Cats in different parts of the country. Would definitely get my attention --- and a good shot at a $2200 order. If only Practical Sailor were still at their peak.....
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Old 12-12-2019, 10:28 AM   #24
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I will be documenting results with pictures during my Sonihull testing.

I put Sandpiper on a tidal grid twice a year. Once in June before the summer cruise and again in October.

The grid trip in June 2020 will reveal how Sonihull did or not do.

I'm still skeptical about ultrasonic antifouling. If it works, why aren't boat manufacturers installing them? And ferries, work boats etc.

Stay tuned.
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Old 05-01-2020, 10:41 PM   #25
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Sonihull

I’ve heard good things. Anyone have experience to Share
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Old 05-02-2020, 01:12 PM   #26
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I installed the Australian brand, Clean-A-Hull on my Nordic Tug 32 several years ago with great results. I was so impressed that when I moved up to a NT 37, I did the same. In each case, I installed more transducers (4) than the manufacturer recommended for that size. The results on my boats, in my waters, have been excellent. Remember that you must start with a clean hull and you must run them 24/7, even while cruising. I am still using an ablative bottom paint. I have a friend who installed Sonihull on his NT 42 with very good results, also in Puget Sound.
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Old 05-02-2020, 01:39 PM   #27
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Thank you. I went with 4 transponders too. Boat bottom is being painted this week and these will go in within a day or two of splash.
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Old 05-02-2020, 04:31 PM   #28
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I'm a dealer for both Sonihull and Ultra-SonicTec. The Ultra Sonic Tec is the US distributor for Clean-A-Hull.

I installed the Sonihull on my boat last December. I sold two more Sonihulls to clients.

I am doing a long term test and will be posting results for the three boats

Look at "Sonihull Ultrasonic Antifouling Install"

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...all-47771.html
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Old 05-02-2020, 09:33 PM   #29
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Subscribing

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Old 06-03-2020, 06:37 PM   #30
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Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system used by Dutch MoD

From Marine industry news:

https://marineindustrynews.co.uk/son...-by-dutch-mod/

BY GINA GROOM JUNE 3, 2020, 10:48AM

“ Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system used by Dutch MoD
Lamers System Care recently installed the Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system on 11 landing-craft vessels for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, to keep them free from algae, weeds and other biofouling.
The Royal Dutch Navy, along with its worldwide fleet and personnel, is committed to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment. With sustainability in mind, the Ministry of Defence chose Sonihull’s ultrasonic system to provide an environmentally safe solution for the anti-fouling of its landing craft.
A Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) is a small vessel designed for the transportation of vehicles or personnel. The type MkV (c) can transport up to 35 fully equipped personnel. The LCVPs are stationed in a protected nature reserve. As a result, anti-fouling coatings that contain toxic chemicals cannot be applied to the ship’s hull in case harmful substances end up in the nature reserve’s water.
Because traditional biocide-based anti-fouling can’t be used, the ships’ hulls are colonised by algae, weeds, barnacles and other biofouling very rapidly. This growth on the LCVPs results in increased fuel-consumption, reduced speed, damage to the hull, and reduced lifespan of the vessel, which is not desirable.
The Sonihull ultrasonic anti-fouling system creates microscopic ultrasound-induced cavitation on the surface of the vessels. This disrupts the first stages of the food chain, without damaging the surface being protected. The action prevents the build-up of algae, slime and bigger, more complex organisms on surfaces where biofouling is not wanted. The system is silent and the movement of water on the protected surface also prevents the adhesion of juvenile barnacles and mussels.
Each of the LCVP units has one Sonihull DUO system, which consists of a control box and two transducers. The transducers are installed on the inside of the vessels to protect the hull from fouling. Instead of the standard composite transducer rings that are glued in place, aluminium mounting rings are used. The rings are bonded to the aluminium hull using a 2-part epoxy resin. The Dutch Ministry of Defence opted for aluminium rings so that it is possible to weld them to the hull if they ever need to be re-located.
The control boxes are connected to both the 220 VAC (shore power) and the 24 VDC, so that the systems remain active 24/7. Due to the extremely low energy consumption (7.2 Watt per transducer), this has no significant impact on the vessels’ energy management.”
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Old 06-03-2020, 09:39 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stout View Post
From Marine industry news:

https://marineindustrynews.co.uk/son...-by-dutch-mod/

BY GINA GROOM JUNE 3, 2020, 10:48AM

“ Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system used by Dutch MoD
Lamers System Care recently installed the Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system on 11 landing-craft vessels for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, to keep them free from algae, weeds and other biofouling.
The Royal Dutch Navy, along with its worldwide fleet and personnel, is committed to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment. With sustainability in mind, the Ministry of Defence chose Sonihull’s ultrasonic system to provide an environmentally safe solution for the anti-fouling of its landing craft.
A Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) is a small vessel designed for the transportation of vehicles or personnel. The type MkV (c) can transport up to 35 fully equipped personnel. The LCVPs are stationed in a protected nature reserve. As a result, anti-fouling coatings that contain toxic chemicals cannot be applied to the ship’s hull in case harmful substances end up in the nature reserve’s water.
Because traditional biocide-based anti-fouling can’t be used, the ships’ hulls are colonised by algae, weeds, barnacles and other biofouling very rapidly. This growth on the LCVPs results in increased fuel-consumption, reduced speed, damage to the hull, and reduced lifespan of the vessel, which is not desirable.
The Sonihull ultrasonic anti-fouling system creates microscopic ultrasound-induced cavitation on the surface of the vessels. This disrupts the first stages of the food chain, without damaging the surface being protected. The action prevents the build-up of algae, slime and bigger, more complex organisms on surfaces where biofouling is not wanted. The system is silent and the movement of water on the protected surface also prevents the adhesion of juvenile barnacles and mussels.
Each of the LCVP units has one Sonihull DUO system, which consists of a control box and two transducers. The transducers are installed on the inside of the vessels to protect the hull from fouling. Instead of the standard composite transducer rings that are glued in place, aluminium mounting rings are used. The rings are bonded to the aluminium hull using a 2-part epoxy resin. The Dutch Ministry of Defence opted for aluminium rings so that it is possible to weld them to the hull if they ever need to be re-located.
The control boxes are connected to both the 220 VAC (shore power) and the 24 VDC, so that the systems remain active 24/7. Due to the extremely low energy consumption (7.2 Watt per transducer), this has no significant impact on the vessels’ energy management.”
Thanks for the article. I hope they post results. I'm going to copy your post onto the thread I started on the Sonihull long term test:

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...all-47771.html
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Old 06-03-2020, 09:43 PM   #32
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Thanks to Stout for posting this on another thread about ultrasonic antifouling:

From Marine industry news:

https://marineindustrynews.co.uk/son...-by-dutch-mod/

BY GINA GROOM JUNE 3, 2020, 10:48AM

“ Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system used by Dutch MoD
Lamers System Care recently installed the Sonihull Ultrasonic Anti-Fouling system on 11 landing-craft vessels for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, to keep them free from algae, weeds and other biofouling.
The Royal Dutch Navy, along with its worldwide fleet and personnel, is committed to maritime safety and the protection of the marine environment. With sustainability in mind, the Ministry of Defence chose Sonihull’s ultrasonic system to provide an environmentally safe solution for the anti-fouling of its landing craft.
A Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP) is a small vessel designed for the transportation of vehicles or personnel. The type MkV (c) can transport up to 35 fully equipped personnel. The LCVPs are stationed in a protected nature reserve. As a result, anti-fouling coatings that contain toxic chemicals cannot be applied to the ship’s hull in case harmful substances end up in the nature reserve’s water.
Because traditional biocide-based anti-fouling can’t be used, the ships’ hulls are colonised by algae, weeds, barnacles and other biofouling very rapidly. This growth on the LCVPs results in increased fuel-consumption, reduced speed, damage to the hull, and reduced lifespan of the vessel, which is not desirable.
The Sonihull ultrasonic anti-fouling system creates microscopic ultrasound-induced cavitation on the surface of the vessels. This disrupts the first stages of the food chain, without damaging the surface being protected. The action prevents the build-up of algae, slime and bigger, more complex organisms on surfaces where biofouling is not wanted. The system is silent and the movement of water on the protected surface also prevents the adhesion of juvenile barnacles and mussels.
Each of the LCVP units has one Sonihull DUO system, which consists of a control box and two transducers. The transducers are installed on the inside of the vessels to protect the hull from fouling. Instead of the standard composite transducer rings that are glued in place, aluminium mounting rings are used. The rings are bonded to the aluminium hull using a 2-part epoxy resin. The Dutch Ministry of Defence opted for aluminium rings so that it is possible to weld them to the hull if they ever need to be re-located.
The control boxes are connected to both the 220 VAC (shore power) and the 24 VDC, so that the systems remain active 24/7. Due to the extremely low energy consumption (7.2 Watt per transducer), this has no significant impact on the vessels’ energy management.”
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Old 06-05-2020, 12:11 PM   #33
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I posted earlier about my experience with Clean-A-Hull. I hauled the boat this week and want to update my comments. Some history: Boat hauled and paint touched up sept 2018. Zincs changed by diver in July 2019. Diver was going to clean hull but said there was nothing there to clean. Boat hauled this week, June 2020. There was a little slime but no grasses. A few barnacles on the prop but none elsewhere. Other boats in my marina grow lots of grass.
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Old 06-05-2020, 01:43 PM   #34
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I posted earlier about my experience with Clean-A-Hull. I hauled the boat this week and want to update my comments. Some history: Boat hauled and paint touched up sept 2018. Zincs changed by diver in July 2019. Diver was going to clean hull but said there was nothing there to clean. Boat hauled this week, June 2020. There was a little slime but no grasses. A few barnacles on the prop but none elsewhere. Other boats in my marina grow lots of grass.
Which bottom paint do you use?

Are you in open or covered moorage?
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Old 06-05-2020, 04:08 PM   #35
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I don't know what brand it is, but it is a hard paint. It was on the boat when I got it and it was only touched up last year. The boat is moored in the open in southern Puget Sound.
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Old 06-06-2020, 08:23 AM   #36
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If the boats hull underwater is solid glass , these can work.


If however it is a cored bottom do not expect good results.
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Old 06-06-2020, 09:38 AM   #37
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Doug,
Is that photo before pressure washing and as it came out of the water?
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Old 06-06-2020, 10:38 AM   #38
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That was taken as it came out. Nothing but a little slime.
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Old 06-06-2020, 10:55 AM   #39
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If the boats hull underwater is solid glass , these can work.


If however it is a cored bottom do not expect good results.
There is a procedure to install the acoustic transducer on cored hulls. The inner skin and coring is removed and the transducer mounted to the outer skin.

I agree that the results would be diminished even with the transducer glued to the outer skin. I think the foam attached to the outer skin would attenuate the vibrations.

Stringers, bulkheads and other hull reinforcements on glass hulls can also reduce the effectiveness of the transducer. Manufacturers recommend installing the transducers away from supporting structure.

The analogy is a musical drum. Stike the drum head in the center and it will be the loudest. Strike towards the rim and the volume will be reduced.

Metal hulls will transmit vibrations more effectively than fiberglass which is why ultrasonic antifouling works so well on large commercial metal hulls.
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Old 06-06-2020, 10:56 AM   #40
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That was taken as it came out. Nothing but a little slime.
That is impressive.
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