Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-15-2021, 01:38 PM   #61
Veteran Member
 
City: Auckland
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 50
I got a 7 mtr hose made up and I just put the tank on the back platform or hang it off the side of the boat in the middle about 1mtr down and I can reach nearly all of the hull for a clean or inspection.
Less cumbersome than putting all the kit on.
KiwiClive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 01:38 PM   #62
Member
 
City: HARWICH PORT
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltrider1 View Post
I will grant that if you are working on your boat in 15' of water there is very little risk with a hookah set up...
The pressure gradient from 15 ft to the surface is the largest there is and has the highest risk from over-pressurization injuries. Holding your breath and going from 65' to 50' probably won't hurt you. 15 to the surface absolutely will. Sorry, didn't mean to get on my soap box. I've seen too many accidents happen near the surface. But I'll cast another vote for training prior to equipment.
battles2a5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 01:44 PM   #63
Veteran Member
 
City: New Bern
Vessel Name: Southern Lady
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 1971 Woodie
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 71
Simple Scuba Setup+

I used to carry Scuba with a short tank. But I recently noticed that a commercial diver cleaning boat bottoms was using an oil-less compressor. When he surfaced he showed me how he had modified the regulator by removing the second stage. I made the mods to my regulator, installed an air filter in the line and changed the fitting on the hose to connect to the compressor. I now have a hassle free-rig that lets me clean the bottom and remove pot lines when needed. BTW, the diver was a retired navy salvage diver so he knew what he was doing.
__________________
Oliver Moore
Southern Lady
GB 42 Woodie
omoore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 01:52 PM   #64
Newbie
 
City: San Clemente
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by magna 6882 View Post
So i discovered i grabbed a crab pot line on my shaft when looking with my go pro. I had a diver come and remove it but it was like if the water wasn't so cold i would have just jumped in and removed the line. It got me thinking about simple diving setups mainly some suit to keep me from freezing. I could just hold my breath but a small tank would be nice. Has anyone played with this type of thing.
I am not looking at diving any lower then the keel or out in the open.
Thoughts??
Check on a Brownie. Its good to 25-30' for quick repairs, cleaning the hull and a little fun. gas powered air supply in a tube, tethers to the boat. The dive suits is a bigger issue. 7Mil for Los Angeles south. Dry suits in SF bay or north, 3Mil baja south
Gattaca515 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 01:56 PM   #65
Veteran Member
 
City: New Bern
Vessel Name: Southern Lady
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 1971 Woodie
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 71
My hack was appealing because I already owned a portable compressor and the Scuba regulator. Very low buck solution.
__________________
Oliver Moore
Southern Lady
GB 42 Woodie
omoore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 01:57 PM   #66
Newbie
 
City: Springdale
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 3
Get in your wet suit and take a hot
shower. You will never feel the cold water. The diving course is a great idea. Lots of ways to get hurt using compressed air for diving
cardinaltlee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 02:17 PM   #67
Member
 
City: Punta Gorda, FL
Vessel Name: School’s Out
Vessel Model: 1983 Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 7
We have used a “Spare Air” on several occasions. It is a small tank about 11 inches long with a mouthpiece. With controlled breathing it will give you about four minutes of air. It is intended as an emergency tank for divers. I have not had trouble getting it filed from a dive shop. It can be filled from a regular dive tank. For cutting a fouled line free it is perfect. Yes, use safety precautions and no weights, but for abut $200, it has helped us several times.
Honch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 02:29 PM   #68
Veteran Member
 
City: East Coast & Caribbean
Vessel Name: Untethered
Vessel Model: Selene 57
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 72
If I were you, I would not get scuba gear. Get an appropriate wet suit and weight belt. Make sure you know how to use the weight belt. You will not need a BC if you're only going keel depth. I would recommend wearing an old bicycle helmet so you don't get a concussion if the hull (or the running gear) drops on your head due to a passing wake, waves or swell.

Full scuba is good for checking the anchor or freeing the rode if needed. However, I would suggest you get certified if you go that route.
La Sirena is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 02:53 PM   #69
Guru
 
RickyD's Avatar
 
City: Long Beach, CA
Vessel Name: Aquarius
Vessel Model: Californian 55 CPMY
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltrider1 View Post
If the goal is to get to the bottom of the boat. The diver is going to need weights. I find weights with out training to be a dangerous combination. I will grant that if you are working on your boat in 15' of water there is very little risk with a hookah set up. What if an inexperienced diver jumps in with 50' water? Does he have the training to get air into his suit before the hookah is yanked out of his mouth from being dragged down by to much weight. Does he know the correct procedure for dumping weight?

I'm not asking for much here. Just a few hours of safety training before messing about in a potentially dangerous setting.
My thought process is #1 you know the amount of weight you will need to become neutral with just a wet suit and gear. #2 you prefill a BC and adjust in the water while still connected to the boat. You don't plan to go to the bottom generally, you just need to get under the boat. I have done it with just a wet suit free diving. A line tightly wrapped around prop and shaft and up into the cutlass bearings. Took me 2.5 hours including three long rest periods to keep from throwing up all the salt water I was drinking by having to come up and breathe. And yes it was rough so I was getting pounded by the shafts, struts, props, and swim platform. Plus, I'm 70 years old. I did not even use weights as I needed to be up against the boat anyway. Man, if I had a hookah or small tank system, it would have made a big difference. I'm going to buy something. I was certified in about 1964. That was before NAUI and PADI. And for those doing math in your heads, yes I lied about my age. So now I would have to get recertified to refill tanks? Damn.
__________________
Aquarius 1991 Californian 55 CPMY Long Beach CA
RickyD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 02:54 PM   #70
Veteran Member
 
billdomb's Avatar
 
City: N palm Beach
Vessel Name: Activated Eau
Vessel Model: Vantare
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 54
If using a hookah, especially, take a knife with you.\

Hoses have bad habits of getting stuck on things like running gear...
billdomb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 03:09 PM   #71
Senior Member
 
City: Courtenay, BC
Vessel Name: Steadfast
Vessel Model: 3870 Bayliner
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 128
I have dove for over 50 years. I even spent some time commercial diving. For 28 years I carried all my gear on my commercial fishing vessels. I only used the gear once in those years to remove a lead line from my shaft after limping into a harbour. I broke three large knives cutting the line out, finally going to a hacksaw to finish the job and pretty much burned up a full tank of air.

I now pleasure boat and do not carry any diving gear aboard other than mask and flippers. I would not consider going under my vessel to remove a line unless I had no other choice. Rather just hire the job done, if possible.

But, please, do not even consider diving with compressed air without taking a basic course. Even, diving in shallow water can be extremely dangerous without the basic knowledge!
Slider70 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 03:19 PM   #72
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber prawn trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 4,684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slider70 View Post
I have dove for over 50 years. I even spent some time commercial diving. For 28 years I carried all my gear on my commercial fishing vessels. I only used the gear once in those years to remove a lead line from my shaft after limping into a harbour. I broke three large knives cutting the line out, finally going to a hacksaw to finish the job and pretty much burned up a full tank of air.
The perfect case for a hookah

Quote:
I now pleasure boat and do not carry any diving gear aboard other than mask and flippers. I would not consider going under my vessel to remove a line unless I had no other choice. Rather just hire the job done, if possible.

But, please, do not even consider diving with compressed air without taking a basic course. Even, diving in shallow water can be extremely dangerous without the basic knowledge!
All good I guess as long as you never venture far. and have a tonne of money.
Simi 60 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 03:28 PM   #73
Newbie
 
City: Boston
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 2
An alternative way to get to the fouled prop

I have done the diving twice both in Maine and is not fun, can be dangerous and we are not getting any younger.
I have an alternative way. It requires a dinghy. Basically, consist of using a water drone to understand the fouling situation and help you to direct (from your dinghy) a long pole with a serrated knife at the end (like the one used for trimming trees). That way you see what you are cutting and you don’t need to get into the water. The water drones are anywhere from 600-2000 bucks but the simplest will do the job. Nice new technology.
sasemr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 03:46 PM   #74
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116 2008
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,898
When I was buying a longer hose for my hookah, I asked if one needs to be certified to buy a hookah. I was told, 'not necessary but encouraged to take classes.'
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 03:50 PM   #75
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116 2008
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,898
Last time I took my tanks in and hydro, I was never asked if I was certified.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 04:05 PM   #76
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 2,450
Quote:
Originally Posted by battles2a5 View Post
The pressure gradient from 15 ft to the surface is the largest there is and has the highest risk from over-pressurization injuries. Holding your breath and going from 65' to 50' probably won't hurt you. 15 to the surface absolutely will. Sorry, didn't mean to get on my soap box. I've seen too many accidents happen near the surface. But I'll cast another vote for training prior to equipment.
I'm not an expert by any means, but I'd have thought your lungs were sensitive (for rupture) only to absolute pressure difference. I can blow about 3 psi on a gage. Any more than that I assume might do damage.

The absolute pressure difference in an ascent through 15' of water is the same no matter the depth - about 7 psi. The pressure change is due to the weight of the column of water, and 15' of water is the same anywhere. The percentage change in pressure will be greater near the surface, but you lungs deal in absolute differences, not percentages.

So don't hold your breath going up 15', from 15' deep or 65' deep. You should expect the results to be similar.
DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 04:25 PM   #77
Senior Member
 
IntoTheBlue's Avatar
 
City: Oakdale NY
Vessel Name: Into The Blue
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 43
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 145
I have always had both a 2 mil and 4 mil wetsuit primarily for the reason of having to snorkel in to cut line off my running gear or for some other related function such as a routine inspection of the hull. Even to brush off light growth. I have cleaned fouled props and rudders using a snorkel, but honestly it is a terrible job to do.

Last year I went to a dive shop, who set up a hookah with 25 feet of hose to a large scuba tank. This worked really well to clean some really bad props, struts and rudders. The tank gave me plenty of air to finish the job and it was so much easier than going up for air with a snorkel. The only problem I see with my set up is getting the tank refilled. I thought that were dive shop's all over within the various ports we travel to. Not the case. So I would probably would go with the compressor style (although very pricey).

The experience did turn me into considering actually scuba diving. I discussed that with dive shop and will probably go for lessons and certification this upcoming season.
IntoTheBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 04:33 PM   #78
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,215
So far I've only once wrapped rope around the prop, and was able to cut it free with just a mask. Don't try it in rough water.

I used a hookah for bottom and prop cleaning and find they work well. I just don't have the space on the boat for more accessories.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 05:10 PM   #79
Senior Member
 
City: Bristol, RI
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 128
I've had this Hookah for years (I am certified but haven't dived with tanks for 20 years). I use it probably 3 times a year for getting lines off the props, checking the running gear, and freeing a stuck anchor. I also sometimes use it in the Bahamas for pleasure diving by putting the pump in the dinghy and pulling the dinghy anchor with me. I've never gone deeper than 20ft with it - usually more like 10ft. In almost 10 years it's needed no maintenance and takes up very little storage space.

https://www.seabreathe.com/products/...iver-deck-unit

As I cruise in cold water Maine (with many lobster pots) I also carry a wetsuit (3MM for summer). As well as a hood. As I have a line cutter on the prop I always wear kevlar kitchen gloves in case I brush against it.

I also carry a Hook Knife. If you put it on a boathook, you can often clear a line on the prop from the dinghy or reaching under while swimming beside the boat. You don't have to be able to see the line, just feel around and give the hook knife a good jerk.

https://www.sailorssolutions.com/?pa...ails&Item=CH03
CarlF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2021, 05:20 PM   #80
Member
 
hughespat57's Avatar
 
City: Rock Hill
Vessel Name: BABOAT
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 300 Sundancer DA
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slider70 View Post
I have dove for over 50 years. I even spent some time commercial diving. For 28 years I carried all my gear on my commercial fishing vessels. I only used the gear once in those years to remove a lead line from my shaft after limping into a harbour. I broke three large knives cutting the line out, finally going to a hacksaw to finish the job and pretty much burned up a full tank of air.

I now pleasure boat and do not carry any diving gear aboard other than mask and flippers. I would not consider going under my vessel to remove a line unless I had no other choice. Rather just hire the job done, if possible.

But, please, do not even consider diving with compressed air without taking a basic course. Even, diving in shallow water can be extremely dangerous without the basic knowledge!

DITTO
I did light commercial diving
I am certified
I have used dry suits extensively

Please do not use any compressed air source without proper training

This is no where near the same as recreational snorkeling on some beautiful reef.

Work diving gets physically stressful under the best of conditions.
hughespat57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012