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Old 02-10-2021, 07:36 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by diver dave View Post
I have a pee valve

and no pictures avail of the complete assembly
I just pee in my wet suit..... warms me up.
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Old 02-10-2021, 07:47 PM   #42
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Greetings,
Mr. dd. Pee valves????? Whoa! Dude!


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Old 02-10-2021, 08:55 PM   #43
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Anyone that thinks cutting a tangled line free is the same from one situation or boat type to the next needs to do it a couple more dozen times.

Some can be done free diving by the average old guy, some probably not.
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Old 02-10-2021, 09:13 PM   #44
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There is a whole other approach to dealing with lines in your props. Put cutters on the shafts. Don’t get wet.

I carried a mask and fins if I needed to take a look and had Spurs on my prop shaft. I know of at least one occasion when I hit a line and the Spurs cut it up.
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:03 PM   #45
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There is a whole other approach to dealing with lines in your props. Put cutters on the shafts. Donít get wet.

I carried a mask and fins if I needed to take a look and had Spurs on my prop shaft. I know of at least one occasion when I hit a line and the Spurs cut it up.
All good if you actually have any exposed shaft
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Old 02-10-2021, 11:33 PM   #46
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There are small scuba tanks good for 5 to 10 minutes, I know a number sailing in southern locations with warm water will use them for a basic short dive to check out an anchor problem or prop.

https://www.amazon.ca/SMACO-Equipmen...87869242&psc=1

video of small tank:

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Old 02-11-2021, 02:18 AM   #47
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Mantus anchors sells a small scuba tank just for such situations as you mention.
https://www.mantusmarine.com/mantus-scuba/
(Appropriate Scuba certification/training required for safe use)
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Old 02-11-2021, 06:44 AM   #48
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yeah, I was thinking pony bottle but those little rescue things could work for that purpose well.... I have no experience with them.

The OP mentioned that he had been trained...so i'm assuming certified...just very rusty. Only needs a refresher, maybe...

Seems like for the stated purpose that few minutes would be enough. Personally though I think something a little bit bigger or even that surface supply would be better for general boat life...because that "never to be used emergency check" turns into an occasional bottom check...turns into let me clean a little bit....check the anchor..... I dropped something overboard lets try to find it.....etc....
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Old 02-11-2021, 07:13 AM   #49
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What happens when your 5 to 10 minutes runs out and you're still not done?
With hookah I have another 5 to 10 minutes
And another 5 to 10 minutes
And another 5 to 10 minutes
And another 5 to 10 minutes
And and and

For the cost of that 5 to 10 minute device I have hours of bottom time.
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Old 02-11-2021, 08:58 AM   #50
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those surface supply things sure do look interesting
about 40 ft depth....is that right?

Perhaps a more economical, probably more mechanically reliable, and certainly more neighbor friendly solution perhaps a dive tank stowed on board and a long hose
https://www.diversdirect.com/p/air-l...r-hose-package

either way, I can imagine the long hose being a burden sometimes...getting tangled, etc...
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Old 02-11-2021, 09:26 AM   #51
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those surface supply things sure do look interesting
about 40 ft depth....is that right?
That is a typical limit for the recreational versions that are available for sale. You can, however, go much, much deeper with surface supplied air, depending on the equipment you have. After all, Navy divers routinely use surface supplied air to go hundreds of feet down.
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Old 02-11-2021, 09:43 AM   #52
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...either way, I can imagine the long hose being a burden sometimes...getting tangled, etc...
That would be my concern, too. I'm much more comfortable with a BC and a bottle, but to each his own.
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Old 02-11-2021, 09:48 AM   #53
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The OP was for an "emergency" ..............long hose under a boat or freeing an anchor is a bit different than deep wreck or cave diving.
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Old 02-11-2021, 09:50 AM   #54
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well I suppose if you cannot reach your ankles on dry land it may not be a good idea even if they are quick release
Lol! Sorry way to many visions popped into my head of all our body shapes on here. Or ever one standing up after reading this and trying to touch there toes. Lol everyone did it I bet?
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Old 02-11-2021, 10:06 AM   #55
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those surface supply things sure do look interesting
about 40 ft depth....is that right?
Most limit it to 30'. At 33 feet in salt water you are at two atmospheres of pressure due to the "weight" of the water. There are dive tables and more modern dive computers, that have been produced for decades. Based on max depths and bottom time at depths etc, they calculate gas absorption in tissue and tell divers how long they can stay down base on depths/times achieved during the dive. At shallow depths the bottom time is nearly unlimited (very little gas absorption due to low pressure) but bottom time decreases the deeper one goes, as your body absorbs more gasses (as pressure increases gasses are compressed, making them more easily absorbed by tissues).

Surfacing too quickly or what's called an "un-controlled ascent" allows those gasses to expand too quickly in your tissue (before it can be "off-gassed") which is no bueno. It can cause pain, paralysis or even death. This is decompression sickness or aerobullosis.

Should that happen you are put into a pressurized hyperbaric chamber (air pressure) so your body can off-gas the gasses that have been compressed/absorbed in your tissues. Depth and time is why these amateur rigs limit the depth; so people don't kill/injure themselves by having fun.

The only issue I see in these would be people that don't exhale properly upon heading to the surface or surface too quickly, which can cause a lung embolism, which is also no bueno. Caveat: I'm not a doctor but have been certified and diving for decades.

Getting lessons is an excellent idea, even if one is only diving down 5' under one's keel. Best to know and understand all the possibilities and how to mitigate them prior to playing Jacques Cousteau.
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Old 02-11-2021, 10:10 AM   #56
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As you move from the more routine dockside dives under the boat, to the in-situ situations, the risks do change a bit. Wave action. Close proximity to moving sharp things (prop edges and barnacles), or even blunt moving objects (hull). The proposed emergency could be as well in the ocean as in the AICW. They do make inexpensive bump caps that might be considered. This is why I rather do this work with my legs up high, and my head down low. You will hear boat traffic nearby and perhaps surface for the roll duration, but offshore has clearly got its own challenges. Getting knocked out u/w on solo dives is usually not survivable. But at least you can remove the stray electrical current risk. Last month I saw a scooter diver that ran into a chuck of the earth; he was fine, wore a helmet, but the rock caught him just below the helmet and just above the eye.
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Old 02-11-2021, 10:10 AM   #57
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Greetings,
Mr. O. " Lol everyone did it I bet?" Nope. Not me. I know I have toes down there...somewhere...


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Old 02-11-2021, 03:04 PM   #58
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]

either way, I can imagine the long hose being a burden sometimes...getting tangled, etc...
Rig the hose through the back of your weight belt
Hose has air in it so floats on the surface
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Old 02-12-2021, 07:08 PM   #59
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My entire air system is oiless on our vessel. we have air fittings all over. I have a 100ft hose mated to another hose that supplies me with hot water for my wetsuit to keep me warm. I also have quick connects on the regulator so i can either use a regular regulator or my full face mask. I also agree you should have some scuba training before attempting any of this.
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Old 02-13-2021, 08:36 AM   #60
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My entire air system is oiless on our vessel. we have air fittings all over. I have a 100ft hose mated to another hose that supplies me with hot water for my wetsuit to keep me warm. I also have quick connects on the regulator so i can either use a regular regulator or my full face mask. I also agree you should have some scuba training before attempting any of this.


That sounds super handy for drilling, sanding, air hammer etc. even u/w.
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