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Old 10-22-2017, 01:04 PM   #21
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Carbide-tipped blades. 8^)
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:08 PM   #22
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I have issued hundreds of hot work permits (any work producing sparks or flame) in industrial facilities. For grinding, requirements include removal of combustible materials, fire blankets, running water hose, fire extinguisher, continuous monitoring for flammable vapors (LEL meter), a separate person as fire watch, face shield, leather gloves and notification to the fire brigade.

Grinding in a confined space (another high hazard permit required) increases risk an additional level - add inhalation hazards, asphyxiation, entrapment. Would need forced ventilation and fresh air supplied respirator.

Our maintenance department would not even suggest grinding if the work could be done with a saw, which is not considered hot work.

Sure, industrial requirements can be considered extreme when working on your own equipment but the risks are extreme - fire, explosion, injury, fatality.
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:21 PM   #23
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I have issued hundreds of hot work permits (any work producing sparks or flame) in industrial facilities. For grinding, requirements include removal of combustible materials, fire blankets, running water hose, fire extinguisher, continuous monitoring for flammable vapors (LEL meter), a separate person as fire watch, face shield, leather gloves and notification to the fire brigade.

Grinding in a confined space (another high hazard permit required) increases risk an additional level - add inhalation hazards, asphyxiation, entrapment. Would need forced ventilation and fresh air supplied respirator.

Our maintenance department would not even suggest grinding if the work could be done with a saw, which is not considered hot work.

Sure, industrial requirements can be considered extreme when working on your own equipment but the risks are extreme - fire, explosion, injury, fatality.
In our Industrial law, it was often said the only safe machine was one so well equipped with safety guards it could not be used at all. We are getting close to it.
It won`t hurt to get a sawzall clone, and see if it does the job. There is a Stanley one on special on Ebay. If I still need to use the angle grinder I`ve still got the sawzall for other stuff.
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:53 PM   #24
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The Home Depot Rigid one handed sawzall is one of my favorite tools.

It finished a heavy steel fuel tank and a half when I burned up 2 heavy duty ones on the first half of the first tank.

I agree about safety, but regulations are for the bottom of the food chain and with proper care, many procedures are acceptable. All work environments are harzardous if not careful.
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:57 PM   #25
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It won`t hurt to get a sawzall clone, and see if it does the job. There is a Stanley one on special on Ebay. If I still need to use the angle grinder I`ve still got the sawzall for other stuff.
Beat me to it.
If you don't already have a Sawzall, this is a good time to buy one. I think it will do the job, although mine is a 110v one. Have been really tempted to buy a battery powered one. I'd sure like to hear how it goes, and what saw(volts) and blades you bought.
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Old 10-22-2017, 07:45 PM   #26
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Ordered a corded model online. I may not get to the job for 2 weeks due to other commitments, but will report how it goes, and have my trusty angle grinder with me. I recently replaced all the fire extinguishers on the boat, what could possibly go wrong.
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:54 PM   #27
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I had a similar project and used a Sawzall with Lenox blades as Maerin suggests. My cut was about 8" x 8" and took a half hour. Covered the exposed steel with Awlgrip anti-corrosion primer, then 545 primer, then topcoat. As noted, get a magnet and spend as much time cleaning up as you did cutting. The Sawzall certainly throws a lot of material around, but nothing like an angle grinder but since I haven't used a grinder for a job like the one you described, it may well be a good option.
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Old 10-22-2017, 11:56 PM   #28
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I have used metal cut off wheels that attach to a drill. I buy very thin ones at Harbor Freight about 3" in diameter and around 1/8" thick or less.
Use a variable speed drill at slow speed to minimize the sparks and dust.
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Old 10-28-2017, 03:09 PM   #29
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I am into my second Milwaukee sawzall...wore the first one out. For the job you describe, my choice is angle grinder with plenty of wet rags to catch flying sparks. IF you do go with the saw, you should use oil on the blade and that by itself is going to make a mess.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:10 PM   #30
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Once you get a cordless sawzall, you will be amazed at how often you use it. I'd also second the "thumbs up" for Ridgid. Lifetime guarantee on it including the batteries. That's huge.

(My saw is a Dewalt, but I have a Ridgid drill that I'm very happy with)
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Old 10-28-2017, 10:38 PM   #31
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The sawzall is the tool I use the less. The cut is so imprecise that it is rarely of any use for me.

L
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Old 10-28-2017, 11:56 PM   #32
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The sawzall is the tool I use the less. The cut is so imprecise that it is rarely of any use for me.

L
Agreed. Pretty much a demolition tool.

I'm on my third one...
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Old 10-29-2017, 09:39 AM   #33
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Trick to using a sawzall is to go slow, use a fine tooth blade and use a cutting fluid. Even wd40 will work. When it starts smoking, stop and give it another squirt. Blades wear when they overheat. Keep them cool, they last a long time.

I cut through a 3" ss rudder shaft with a sawzall. Took a long time and only a couple blades. Never again!!
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Old 10-29-2017, 10:25 AM   #34
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I have the same one-handed saw that PS has, use a carbide tipped blade and a lubricant. You could cut up your entire boat with it.
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Old 10-29-2017, 01:22 PM   #35
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If you go with a harbor freight tool, get their warranty, so when it smokes, you get a replacement tool...

If you use a grinder, make sure to use a carbide cut-off wheel and don't try to grind through it. It has a narrow kerf and will cut more in less time.

If you're using a sawzall, you can coat the surface with heavy grease and have it capture some of the chips for you.

If chips flying were not a major problem, I'd cut it with a skilsaw. It's amazing what they can cut! Make sure to use a face shield though
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Old 11-26-2017, 02:01 AM   #36
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Job done using the Stanley corded reciprocating saw(as it is called here, rather than sawzall),with Lennox metal cutting blades, and a cutting lubricant. Awkward tight working position in the lazarette and the need to not cut adjacent structures, like the rudder stocks, did not help but we got there. At one stage I tried using a 100mm/4" angle grinder for a short extra cut, too many hot glowing fragments for my liking to continue.
We protected the area with old damp towels, and kept a fire extinguisher handy. The area was vacuumed up immediately after.
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Old 11-26-2017, 05:00 AM   #37
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Thanks for the update. Good to hear of success.

I'll have to locate some Lennox blades for my cordless Milwaukee. No project at present, but I like to be well prepared!
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